Arts & Sciences course descriptions

  • Aboriginal Studies

    ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    This course is the foundation course in Aboriginal Studies.  It aims at promoting, from an historical perspective, an understanding of the Aboriginal people of modern Australia.  It focuses on a broad range of ideas including Aboriginal and European contact and the ensuing disruption of traditional culture, interracial conflict and government legislation.  The course provides an introduction to a number of current issues affecting Aboriginal people including health, education, law, business, cross-cultural relationships, land rights and Aboriginal self-determination.

    ABOR2000 The Cultural and Spiritual Life of Aboriginal People 
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    The first part of the course looks at Aboriginal society and culture in its more traditional forms and what social organisation is understood to be like prior to the European invasion of Australia. The following topics will be studied: the social organisation and structure of traditional Aboriginal society (e.g. basic social groups, kinship and marriage customs); the relationship with the land; the lifestyle and various initiations associated with it; religious belief and practices, for example, The Dreaming, how Aboriginal people are connected to country, rituals and healing. In the second part of the course, students will develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of culture and appreciate that Aboriginal culture is not static. Contemporary issues studied such as the recognition of customary law, land rights and Aboriginal heritage protection show students the cultural continuities that sustain Aboriginal world views.

    ABOR2720 History of Aboriginal Education
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal  People
    This course offers education students an opportunity to develop an appreciation of historical events, which is an essential element in their understanding of contemporary issues relating to the education of Indigenous Australians and, as educators, their active involvement in the reconciliation process. The course is also designed to extend and round out other Aboriginal Studies courses offered by the School of Arts and Sciences as part of the Aboriginal Studies program, providing students with a more in-depth understanding of social, cultural and political historical and contemporary relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

    ABOR3030 Aboriginal People in Contemporary Australian Society 
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal People
    This course has been developed for students whose future careers require an in-depth understanding of the complex, multi-layered field of contemporary inter-cultural relationships. In particular it aims to develop in students an appreciation of this relationship within the socio-political context of conflicting values and beliefs, government policies and service delivery. To achieve this objective the course commences with an examination of the nature and diversity of Aboriginal knowledge and experience as an introduction to the fundamental issues underlying contemporary debate over land, native title and regional agreements. The basic interconnections between federalism, bureaucracy and service delivery are then analysed at the macro level, through an examination of our current political/funding structures, before utilising case studies as a means of developing an understanding of what is happening “on the ground”. The issues of relationships of power, community governance and the employment of non-Aboriginal expertise within the Aboriginal domain are dealt with in the context of local studies situated within WA. The final module then focuses on welfare dependency, symptom or cause, as the major issue currently under the socio-political spotlight.

    ABOR3040 Aboriginal People and the Media
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    This course has been developed within the context of Notre Dame's commitment to the process of reconciliation and the provision of opportunities to enhance personal growth through engagement in challenging intellectual undertaking. In attempting to meet these commitments Aboriginal People and the Media offers students an opportunity to study the problematic relationship that exists between the media and the Indigenous peoples of Australia using media analysis techniques of semiology and discourse analysis to ‘read’ media texts. The course explores the media as the public sphere, where information about social, cultural and political issues of national importance are presented and debated, and how Aboriginality is represented within the public sphere of Australian mainstream media. In the final module, the course examines the growing Aboriginal response to the power and influence of the media through active involvement in establishing Indigenous alternatives within and outside the mainstream public sphere – the Indigenous public sphere.

    ABOR3310 Aboriginal People and the Legal System
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    This course will focus on certain aspects of Aboriginal law in communities, leading into an understanding of the legal implications of European settlement on the Aboriginal population. The content will then move into an exploration of the contemporary issues faced by Aboriginal people under current domestic and international law.

    ABOR5010 The Cultural and Spiritual Life of Aboriginal People 
    The first part of the course looks at Aboriginal society and culture in its more traditional forms and what social organisation is understood to be like prior to the European invasion of Australia. The following topics will be studied: the social organisation and structure of traditional Aboriginal society (e.g. basic social groups, kinship and marriage customs); the relationship with the land; the lifestyle and various initiations associated with it; religious belief and practices, for example, The Dreaming, how Aboriginal people are connected to country, rituals and healing. In the second part of the course, students will develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of culture and appreciate that Aboriginal culture is not static. Contemporary issues studied such as the recognition of customary law, land rights and Aboriginal heritage protection show students the cultural continuities that sustain Aboriginal world views.

    ABOR5030 Aboriginal People in Contemporary Australian Society
    This course has been developed for students whose future careers require an in-depth understanding of the complex, multi-layered field of contemporary inter-cultural relationships.  In particular it aims to develop in students an appreciation of this relationship within the socio-political context of conflicting values and beliefs, government policies and service delivery.  To achieve this objective the course commences with an examination of the nature and diversity of Aboriginal knowledge and experience as an introduction to the fundamental issues underlying contemporary debate over land, native title and regional agreements.  The basic interconnections between federalism, bureaucracy and service delivery are then analysed at the macro level, through an examination of our current political/funding structures, before utilising case studies as a means of developing an understanding of what is happening “on the ground”.  The issues of relationships of power, community governance and the employment of non-Aboriginal expertise within the Aboriginal domain are dealt with in the context of local studies situated within WA. The final module then focuses on welfare dependency, symptom or cause, as the major issue currently under the socio-political spotlight.

    ABOR5310 Aboriginal People and the Legal System
    This course will focus on certain aspects of Aboriginal law in communities, leading into an understanding of the legal implications of European settlement on the Aboriginal population. The content will then move into an exploration of the contemporary issues faced by Aboriginal people under current domestic and international law.

    ABOR5040 Aboriginal People and the Media
    This course explores the relationships between Aboriginal interests and the media. Commencing with a study of the historical role played by the media in shaping colonial attitudes towards Indigenous Australians it then moves on to examine the nature and depth of current television and newspaper coverage of Aboriginal affairs. The course also explores theories and practices relating to the nature of the media before concluding with an examination of recent Aboriginal media initiatives in both print and electronic mediums.

  • Archaeology

    ARCL1020 Introduction to Archaeology
    Archaeology is a dynamic worldwide discipline that draws on both the sciences and humanities to interpret material remains of the human past. This course introduces the basic definitions and concepts for archaeological research and includes a practical component. It provides an introduction to archaeology for those who are interested in the discipline, as well as a foundation course with generic skills like critical and reflective learning for those wishing to proceed to any senior course of study in archaeology. This two-part subject provides, first, an introduction to the history and development of archaeological research from antiquarianism to the present science. It also examines at a general level relative and absolute dating methods and chronological sequences. The course also comprises an excavation component.

    ARCL1030 Reading the Past: Interpretation from Archaeology
    This course analyses archaeological research from around the world and through time. It looks at famous, and not so famous, archaeological discoveries and studies them in regard to hypothesis development, methodology, theory, fieldwork and interpretation enhancement. Using this research shows the actual issues and joys of archaeology. The course also examines the challenges, discoveries and mistakes made by the researchers in their pursuit of discovering past cultures.

    ARCL3008 Archaeology Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Archaeology internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice..  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    ARCL3010 Maritime Archaeology: Ships and Harbours
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The location of Notre Dame's Fremantle campus in Western Australia's famous port city abides well for this subject that explores the archaeology of maritime societies and industries. It examines the range of underwater and terrestrial archaeology resources available, including shipwrecks and their contents, submerged settlements, Indigenous maritime sites, evidence for past trade, defence and navigation networks, as well as canals and sites on inland waters. Various techniques for archaeological, documentary and ethnographic research on maritime themes are reviewed. In particular, the notion 'maritime landscapes' - using Western Australian maritime sites - is considered as a means of investigation and interpretation.

    ARCL3020 The Archaeology of Indigenous Australia
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course addresses some of the major questions about the Aboriginal occupation of Australia in pre-European times by considering archaeological evidence and examining what it consists of, how it is obtained, and how it is used in the construction of arguments.  Students will be engaged in such topics as the role, place and relevance of Australia to our comprehension of international prehistory; interdisciplinary research regarding Quaternary Australia; the relationship between the pre-European archaeology of Australia and that of Southeast Asia; and the degree to which modern Aboriginal culture is informed by our understanding of its archaeology.  Our studies of Indigenous Archaeology will make use of excellent case studies and findings from around Australia, ideally equipping graduates with industry-ready skills and knowledge, positioning them for national employment opportunities.  In addition to such specific learning opportunities, students will be encouraged to develop excellent analytical, research and communication skills considered necessary for further archaeological and other research.

    ARCL3030 Unearthing the Past The History of Archaeology of Western Australia
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course uses a suite of written and oral (history) and material (archaeology) evidence in its examination of past human use of Australia's western third. It is an ancient story, influenced by isolation and enormous size, beginning at least 40,000 years ago. This course examines the area’s occupation by Indigenous Australians before the arrival of the Dutch, French and British from the 17th century. With the formation of Western Australia in 1829, the course examines the history and archaeology of settlement by the British and the following exploration of vast areas that discovered mineral wealth that drives the State’s economy to this day. The discovery of gold, iron ore and other minerals has its own history and material signature, while the necessity of providing enough food for its small population has seen the location of farming change over time as technology permitted the development of semi-arid land into today’s wheat belt and semi-tropical north. The small population of this part of the continent of Australia has influenced world and national events during times of conflict, on the sporting field, in the arts, and in politics. For decades, Australian history comes from the perspective of the writers and social observers of the eastern States; this course turns that interpretation on its head by examining Western Australia as a separate geopolitical and historical entity.

    ARCL3040 Archaeological Field Methods
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Fieldwork is a key research tool in archaeology and develops many skills that have extensive professional applications. This course provides, by use of bona-fide archaeological sites, knowledge of methods and the techniques that may be applied in archaeological contexts and situations. The emphasis of this course is on gaining competence, or developing an existing competence, in the broad range of techniques involved in fieldwork practice. During fieldwork, students undertake surface exploration and excavation, environmental sampling techniques and recording. After fieldwork, students will be involved in post excavation processing and archival work. The course is tailored to archaeology students, but students from other areas such as education and outdoor recreation may also benefit from the skills developed in this course.

  • Architecture

    ARCH5001  Architectural Technologies 2: Skills Intensive
    This intensive course provides an opportunity for students to hone their practical skills in architectural technology. The topics offered vary by semester from either Design/Make workshops to advanced computational skills.

    ARCH5002   Architectural Design Studio 1:  Site-specific series
    This foundational design studio focuses on the broad idea of site-specific design responses. Students are given a scaffolded approach to understanding and applying different design processes to a small project series. Topics include an exploration of concepts and idea-driven design; site analysis, interpretation and 'reading' site.

    ARCH5003  Architectural Strategies and Skills A
    In this foundational course students develop fundamental strategies and skills in the communication and visualisation of architectural ideas. Students complete exercises in sketch and hand drawing, basic model-making, and 2D computer drawing.

    ARCH5004  Architectural Strategies and Skills B
    This course provides students with an opportunity to further develop strategies and skills in the communication and visualisation of architectural ideas. Students complete exercises in sectional and perspective drawing, conceptual model-making, 2D and 3D computer drawing, and photographic collage techniques.

    ARCH5005  Architectural Contexts, Theory and Critique
    This introductory course explores key philosophical and theoretical approaches to architecture. Using an analytical, ethnographic and/or anthropological lens, architectural design approaches are critiqued. In this course students examine frameworks of analysis to further understand building typology, function and occupation.

    ARCH5006  Architectural Technologies 1: Building Systems
    This foundational technology course equips students with a broad understanding of building structures, constructional systems, material selection and properties.

    ARCH5007   Architectural Design Studio 2: Residential Projects
    This design studio critically examines contemporary residential design issues. Using a project-based learning approach, students design responses to residential strategies based on project briefs that range from small-scale sub-divisions and infill developments to larger student or affordable housing solutions.

    ARCH5008  Architectural Contexts: Precedent Studies
    In this course students analyse and critique key contemporary and historic precedents to gain an understanding of cultural, historical and social shifts in trends within the built environment. The analysis builds on the framework developed previously in the program.

    ARCH5009  Architectural Technologies 3: Environmentally Sustainable Design
    This course critically examines the theme of Environmentally Sustainable Design. Students gain knowledge in solar design principles, environmental systems and building energy use. The lecture series delivers foundational components of knowledge under the National Standard of Competency for Architects (NCSA). The knowledge and skills of sustainable design, developed in this course, are applied to the project undertaken in the residential design studio.

    ARCH6000 Architectural Design Studio 3: Public Projects
    This design studio critically examines the architecture of public buildings. Using a project-based learning approach, students develop design briefs and design solutions that focus on ethical user engagement within public buildings. The project briefs will vary each year and may include projects such as a small healthcare facility or a courthouse building. In this studio, students apply their design knowledge and skills to meet the often-competing needs of stakeholders and building users within a single design project.

    ARCH6001  Architectural Contexts: Urbanism and the Living City
    In this course students analyse the historical, contemporary, and cultural elements of the urban condition of a living city using qualitative methods. This course builds upon the philosophical and theoretical approaches and frameworks introduced previously in the program.

    ARCH6002  Architectural Design Studio 4 : Contextual Projects (ST/WT)
    This intensive design studio focuses on the relationship between landscape, culture and region. The studio uses a project-based learning approach to understand the importance of site, culture and community needs and will be set within diverse contexts, such as an Indigenous community, a regional area or an international setting. This studio may involve a fieldtrip to the proposed site, landscape or region.

    ARCH6003  Technology in Practice: Practicum A
    Technology in Practice: Practicum A focuses on design development and is comprised of two parts. The lecture series discusses the key elements of detail design development to enable students to complete design development drawings of a small building or element during their placement. Guest speakers deliver content and practical examples of design development in practice. Detail design development topics include: performance standards, regulatory requirements, materials, finishes, properties, components and systems. The practicum component applies this learning in the professional workplace. Students work alongside their mentor and complete an evidence workbook addressing the National Standard of Competency for Architects (NSCA) requirements. This is a Part A of a multi term course that will be completed at the end of the next semester.

    ARCH6004  Technology in Practice: Practicum
    Technology in Practice: Practicum B focuses on design documentation and  comprised of two parts. The lecture series discusses the key elements of design documentation to enable students to complete documentation drawings of a small building component or element during their placement. Guest speakers deliver content and practical examples of documentation in practice. Topics include integration and use of computer technology, documentation standards, services and systems integration. The practicum component applies this learning in the professional workplace. Students work alongside their mentor and complete an evidence workbook addressing all the competencies of the National Standard of Competency for Architects (NSCA).

    ARCH6005  Architectural Design Studio 5: Heritage Contexts
    This design studio focuses on design within and around heritage settings. Using project-based learning, students critically examine a heritage site to develop an approach to the adaptive re-use of the interior and the potential for a contemporary extension to the building. Topics include contemporary design responses to the legislation, codes and standards for heritage projects along with technical and scientific aspects of technology and material use. Students gain a wide understanding of the connections between cultural memory and historical pasts with new spatial interpretations and practical uses.

    ARCH6006  Advanced Research Studio 6: Community Building
    This advanced research studio critically examines the role of community building in architecture. Using project-based learning, students draw together philosophical and ethical approaches to architecture through the design of a community building project. Through the process of collaboratively developing the project brief, students develop high-level diverse and inclusive stakeholder communication and participatory design skills. Students also gain an understanding of the role of active citizenship within architectural practice.

    ARCH6007  Architectural Research Methods
    This course is designed to provide an overview of research methods commonly used in architecture. Topics covered include historical, theoretical, qualitative, creative, case study and mixed-method approaches to research. Students work in small research clusters to develop research methods and proposals relevant to contemporary architectural investigation.

    ARCH6008 Professional Practice Practicum
    This professional practice course comprises of two parts. The lecture series covers topics such as client agreements, fee scales, procurement processes, building contracts, specifications and costings. The practicum component applies this learning in the professional workplace. Students work alongside their mentor and complete an evidence workbook addressing the National Standard of Competency for Architects (NSCA) requirements.

    ARCH6009 Advanced Practice-Led Research Studio 7
    In this advanced research studio the importance of building design is explored in relation to socio-spatial, cultural, political, technical, economic or historical aspects of contemporary practice in architecture. These practice-led studios are delivered in small clusters either within leading design environments, whose focus is selected based on identified future practice, or on campus by academic staff in areas of research priority. Topics will vary from year to year based on the research focus and student demand. This capstone studio reinforces the delivery of all design competencies under the National Standard of Competency for Architects (NSCA).

    ARCH6010  Independent Research Project
    This course enables highly-motivated students to undertake an approved independent self-directed research project.  The importance of building design is explored in relation to socio-spatial, cultural, political, technical, economic and historical aspects of contemporary practice in architecture. Students are allocated a supervising mentor from the University or from practice. Students undertaking this course also enrol in a Research Writing course to assist in the completion of the written exegesis component of the research.

    ARCH6011  Practice Management Practicum
    This professional practice management course is comprised of two parts. The lecture series builds on the earlier course in professional ethics and covers topics such as professional practice models, services and management; and legal, regulatory, ethical and professional obligations. The practicum component applies this learning in the professional workplace. Students work alongside and ‘shadow’ their mentor to complete an evidence workbook addressing the National Standard of Competency for Architects (NSCA) requirements. Students may select alternative or non-traditional practice modes to align with their individual career goals.

  • Arts

    ARTS1000 Academic Writing, Communication and Research
    (No prerequisite. Compulsory course for all Arts & Sciences students) 
    This course introduces students to techniques and approaches to develop learning skills that foster successful study at university. The course covers key aspects of researching, writing and formal speaking in academic contexts, and works to develop communication skills necessary for effective participation in group learning activities and collaborative projects. Students initially learn how to locate relevant information from a broad range of printed and electronic sources and how to document and reference sources in written work. Following the information literacy component, students will produce a researched essay, developing skills in critical evaluation and synthesis of information, the development of argument, and the presentation of academic documents.

    ARTS2000 Professional Communication for Graduate Employability
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 200 units of credit of prior learning.
    This course aims to improve academic performance and prepare students for graduate employment by developing their written and other communication skills. It intends, principally, to teach higher-order writing skills and to enable the confident use of language. It extends students’ research skills to enable objective, well-reasoned and evidence-based writing. In practical sessions, students critique and edit samples of their own work to achieve professional standards. In addition, this course helps students prepare for the graduate workplace by teaching a range of professional etiquette skills. Students consider how to adapt writing and other communications for different purposes, and identify how to develop successful and effective working relationships.

    ARTS3008 Arts Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 200 units of credit of prior learning.
    Arts internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    ARTS3010 Experience the World I
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 200 units of credit of prior learning.
    This course provides students an opportunity for extended learning (to the value of 25 credit points) in overseas or other Australian locations as part of the School of Arts and Sciences' 'Experience the World' program.  It will provide students with an opportunity to gain a deeper and richer understanding of other peoples and cultures.  Locations and projects will vary, but may include such destinations as Europe, North America and remote Australian communities.  This course will enrich a student's academic experience at the University of Notre Dame Australia and will, in particular, provide students with a deeper understanding of culture, language, politics, history and other issues relevant to the subject under investigation.  This course will normally be available only to students who have completed the first year of their degree, and has a fully graded assessment structure.

    ARTS3020 Experience the World II
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 200 units of credit of prior learning.
    This course provides students an opportunity for extended learning (to the value of 25 credit points) in overseas or other Australian locations as part of the School of Arts and Sciences' 'Experience the World' program.  It will provide students with an opportunity to gain a deeper and richer understanding of other peoples and cultures.  Locations and projects will vary, but may include such destinations as Europe, North America and remote Australian communities.  This course will enrich a student's academic experience at the University of Notre Dame Australia and will, in particular, provide students with a deeper understanding of culture, language, politics, history and other issues relevant to the subject under investigation.  This course will normally be available only to students who have completed the first year of their degree, and will be assessed on an ungraded pass/fail basis.

    ARTS3030 Experience the World Study Tour
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 200 units of credit of prior learning.
    This course provides students with an opportunity for extended learning (to the value of 50 credit points) in overseas or other Australian locations as part of the School of Arts and Sciences' 'Experience the World' program.  It will provide students with an opportunity to gain a deeper and richer understanding of other peoples, cultures and environments.  Locations and projects will vary, but may include such destinations as Europe, North America and remote Australian communities.  This course will enrich a student's academic experience at the University of Notre Dame Australia and will, in particular, provide students with a deeper understanding of culture, language, politics, history, environment and other issues relevant to the subject under investigation.  This course will normally be available to students who have completed the first year of their degree.

    ARTS3750 Australian History and Society
    Pre-requisite: Study Abroad students only
    This course introduces Study Abroad students to the key elements of Australian history and the making of Australian society.  Britain’s experiment of empire in Australian from 1788 was a direct outcome of its loss of the American colonies in 1776.   As such, Australia’s history can be compared with that of other settler societies, including the United States.  Students of AL375 will consider the major events, issues and themes which followed Britain’s colonisation of Australia, including frontier warfare, early convict society, the rise of the bush and Anzac legends, war, Australia’s (early) radical, social democracy, migration and the new nationalism of the modern age.   Yet the making of modern Australia came at the cost of the nation’s environment and indigenous peoples.  Through it all, Australia has had a bloody, determined and vibrant history.  Students of this course will consider the myths, legends and milestones of the past which now make Australia’s history and shape its people.

    ARTS4000 Supervised Honours Research A
    An Honours degree in the School of Arts and Sciences is both personally enriching and intellectually stimulating.  It is also vital for the professional development of students seeking a career that requires knowledge of and/or skills in research practice. Taken as an additional year to the Bachelor Degree, the Honours program includes this full-year course in which students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff.  The thesis, at its submission, should be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student’s capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake an Honours thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but may also consider undertaking an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4001 Supervised Honours Research B
    An Honours degree in the School of Arts and Sciences is both personally enriching and intellectually stimulating.  It is also vital for the professional development of students seeking a career that requires knowledge of and/or skills in research practice. Taken as an additional year to the Bachelor Degree, the Honours program includes this full-year course in which students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff.  The thesis, at its submission, should be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student’s capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake an Honours thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but may also consider undertaking an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4010 Honours Research Seminar I
    The research seminars are an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in the Arts and Sciences.  Here they will build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis.  Students will participate in a School Research Conference regarding their proposed research and, towards the end of their enrolment, regarding their research findings.  These seminars are an ideal forum in which students will consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their own work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with other students regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4020 Honours Research Seminar II
    The research seminars are an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in the Arts and Sciences.  Here they will build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis.  Students will participate in a School Research Conference regarding their proposed research and, towards the end of their enrolment, regarding their research findings.  These seminars are an ideal forum in which students will consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their own work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with other students regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4030 Honours Directed Study
    The Honours Directed Study course provides an advanced learning opportunity.  Students will develop research, problem solving and written communication skills through the completion of a major research project.  The Honours Directed Study course will extend knowledge and enable students to develop applied skills and/or to refine critical analysis of an issue relevant to their discipline or to their Honours thesis project.  Opportunities for a directed study project may include the development of a special individual or group project; the completion of a relevant coursework course at Notre Dame or by cross-institutional enrolment; and special project workshops.

    ARTS4040 Honours Coursework Course II
    The Honours program offers the opportunity for extended scholarship and learning in this coursework course.  In addition to regular reading and participation in class discussions, students will choose an issue from the course on which to write a major research paper.  Students may select a research area in this course to add to the diversity of their Honours experience or, in consultation with their supervisor, may develop a paper which complements their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4050 Supervised Honours Research A
    In this course students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff, culminating in an Honours thesis.  The thesis, at its submission, will be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student's capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake a thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but they may undertake an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4051 Supervised Honours Research B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS4050 Supervised Honours Research A
    In this course students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff, culminating in an Honours thesis.  The thesis, at its submission, will be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student's capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake a thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but they may undertake an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4060 Honours Research Seminar A
    The Honours Research Seminar is an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in Arts and Sciences.  Students will build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis.  Students will present their research proposals and, towards the end of their enrolment, their research findings.  This seminar is an ideal forum in which students will consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their own work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with others regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4061 Honours Research Seminar B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS6060 Honours Research Seminar A
    The Honours Research Seminar is an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in Arts and Sciences.  Students will build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis.  Students will present their research proposals and, towards the end of their enrolment, their research findings.  This seminar is an ideal forum in which students will consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their own work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with others regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4100 Supervised Honours Research – Science A
    An Honours degree in the School of Arts and Sciences is both personally enriching and intellectually stimulating.  It is also vital for the professional development of students seeking a career that requires knowledge of and/or skills in research practice. Taken as an additional year to the Bachelor Degree, the Honours program includes this full-year course in which students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff.  The thesis, at its submission, should be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student’s capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake an Honours thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but may also consider undertaking an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4101 Supervised Honours Research – Science B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS4100 Supervised Honours Research Science A
    An Honours degree in the School of Arts and Sciences is both personally enriching and intellectually stimulating.  It is also vital for the professional development of students seeking a career that requires knowledge of and/or skills in research practice. Taken as an additional year to the Bachelor Degree, the Honours program includes this full-year course in which students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff.  The thesis, at its submission, should be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student’s capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake an Honours thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but may also consider undertaking an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4110 Honours Research Seminar I – Science
    Research seminars are an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in the Arts and Sciences. Students build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis. Students present their research proposals and, towards the end of their enrolment, their research findings. These seminars are an ideal forum in which students consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their own work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with other students regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4120 Honours Research Seminar II – Science
    Research seminars are an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in the Arts and Sciences. Students build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis. Students present their research proposals and, towards the end of their enrolment, their research findings. These seminars are an ideal forum in which students consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their own work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with other students regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4130 Honours Coursework Unit I – Science
    The Honours program offers the opportunity for extended scholarship and learning in this coursework unit.  In addition to regular reading and participation in class discussions, students will choose an issue from the unit on which to write a major research paper.  Students may select a research area in this unit to add to the diversity of their Honours experience or, in consultation with their supervisor, may develop a paper which complements their Honours thesis.

    ARTS5010 Research Methods
    This course provides a broad exposure to the principal forms of social science research used in counselling, educational and related social sciences. As such, it provides a basic foundation in research design, methods, data collection and data analysis for higher degree students planning to proceed to a dissertation or thesis. At the same time, it offers a general understanding of research design and methodological issues for professionals who may be required to commission investigations or approve proposals for study by others, and who need to be able to interpret and critically evaluate the findings of published research. Students gain experience in a range of qualitative and quantitative techniques which can be used by practising professionals to carry out individual or team-based action-research into issues arising from their own work settings, organisations, or wider professional activities. Emphasis is on differentiating between, and making appropriate and justified choices among, the principal paradigms or methodological approaches used by contemporary social science researchers.

    ARTS6000 Literature Review
    In this course students will complete a critical review of scholarly and other significant literatures that relate to their thesis topic or area of study. Tuition will be provided in an intensive format or by supervision, though much of the learning approach will be student-driven and performed independently. This course will directly support the completion of a postgraduate research project, such as a thesis.

    ARTS6001 Professional Project
    The Professional Project provides an advanced learning opportunity for postgraduate students in the humanities and social sciences.  Working independently, students investigate a challenging problem using the research skills and knowledge acquired from their discipline.  Students deliver a well-reasoned and articulate report.  The Professional Project is therefore intended to apply students’ research skills, increase their proficiency within their own discipline, and enhance their graduate employability.

    ARTS6002 Experience the World
    This course provides students an opportunity to pursue a unique research or professional project while on an Experience the World placement. The outcome of this course is a written or creative work of around 5000 words (or the equivalent). The Experience the World project will be positioned within the student’s discipline or profession, and may contribute directly to a student’s thesis. Experience the World projects will be informed by relevant theory, literature and research, and will demonstrate the ethical and technical requirements of the discipline. Students might work independently or within a group, employing flexibility and sound judgement.

    ARTS6003 Research Project A
    This course, in combination with ARTS6004 Research Project B, enables students to undertake a research project of up to 10,000 words.  Equivalent project lengths may be considered for creative works.  Students pursue individual professional and/or academic research interests.  Meeting regularly with an academic supervisor, students may work individually or in a group.  Students should complete appropriate research methods training before enrolling in this course.

    ARTS6004 Research Project B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS6003 Research Project A
    This course, in combination with ARTS6003 Research Project A, enables students to undertake a research project of up to 10,000 words.  Equivalent project lengths may be considered for creative works.  Students pursue individual professional and/or academic research interests.  Meeting regularly with an academic supervisor, students may work individually or in a group.

    ARTS6005 Special Project
    This Special Project course provides students an opportunity to pursue a unique research project, the result of which is a written or creative work of around 5000 words (or equivalent). The special project will be positioned within the student’s discipline or profession, and may contribute directly to a thesis or be a published outcome of it. Special projects will be informed by relevant theory, literature and research, and will demonstrate the ethical and technical requirements of the discipline. Students may work independently or within a group, employing flexibility and sound judgement.

    ARTS6030 Professional Group Project
    The Professional Group Project provides an advanced learning opportunity for postgraduate students in the humanities and social sciences.  Working in groups, students investigate a challenging problem using the research skills and knowledge acquired from their discipline.  Students analyse the problem with an interdisciplinary lens, collaborate in a professional manner, and deliver a well-reasoned and articulate report.  The Professional Group Project is therefore intended to apply students’ research skills, increase their proficiency within their own discipline, and enhance their graduate employability.

  • Behavioural Science

    BESC1000 Developmental Psychology
    This course examines human development within a critical wellbeing framework that integrates the person into his or her relationships and communities. Lifespan development assumes the person is in a state of constant development: psychologically, socially and biologically, and therefore understanding these complex interactions contributes to an understanding of behaviour in response to challenges that arise across the lifespan.  The major theories of human development are examined and critiqued in the light of contemporary research evidence and the practical implications of those theories for working with people at different stages of life are discussed. Students are also encouraged to apply these perspectives to their own development and growth. There is a strong emphasis on the critical thinking skills required to evaluate and utilise psychological theories and perspectives.

    BESC1020 Foundations of Human Behaviour
    This course introduces students to the historical and contemporary theories and assumptions that contribute to our understanding of human behaviour. There is a particular emphasis on traditional psychological theories of human functioning due to their influence in creating universal laws that attempt to explain human functioning. Specific areas such as personality, motivation, cognition, and perception are explored as these provide the foundation for our understanding of the person. Students are encouraged to critique these theories and identify challenges to the concept that universal laws of behaviour can be generated that negate factors such as the political, economic, cultural, and social influences

    BESC1050 Social Science Research
    In this course students are introduced to a range of different research methodologies that will enable them to interpret research, in order to more fully appreciate the complexities of social interaction and human behaviour. Scientific knowledge is based on research evidence and therefore the ability to understand, interpret, critique, and apply research, including statistical analysis to professional practice is an essential skill for the social scientist. Students will be encouraged to develop their critical thinking capacity, learn to apply scientific evidence to everyday issues in order to promote social justice and equity, as well as engage with a range of research methods.

    BESC1110 Developmental Psychology - Health Sciences
    This course examines human development within a critical wellbeing framework that integrates the person into his or her relationships and communities. Lifespan development assumes the person is in a state of constant development: psychologically, socially and biologically, and therefore understanding these complex interactions contributes to an understanding of behaviour in response to challenges that arise across the lifespan.  The major theories of human development are examined and critiqued in the light of contemporary research evidence and the practical implications of those theories for working with people at different stages of life are discussed. Students are also encouraged to apply these perspectives to their own development and growth. There is a strong emphasis on the critical thinking skills required to evaluate and utilise psychological theories and perspectives.

    BESC1120 Developmental Psychology – Education
    This course examines human development within a critical wellbeing framework that integrates the person into his or her relationships and communities. Lifespan development assumes the person is in a state of constant development: psychologically, socially and biologically, and therefore understanding these complex interactions contributes to an understanding of behaviour in response to challenges that arise across the lifespan.  The major theories of human development are examined and critiqued in the light of contemporary research evidence and the practical implications of those theories for working with people at different stages of life are discussed. Students are also encouraged to apply these perspectives to their own development and growth. There is a strong emphasis on the critical thinking skills required to evaluate and utilise psychological theories and perspectives.

    BESC1130 Developmental Psychology – Nursing
    This course examines human development within a critical wellbeing framework that integrates the person into his or her relationships and communities. Lifespan development assumes the person is in a state of constant development: psychologically, socially and biologically, and therefore understanding these complex interactions contributes to an understanding of behaviour in response to challenges that arise across the lifespan.  The major theories of human development are examined and critiqued in the light of contemporary research evidence and the practical implications of those theories for working with people at different stages of life are discussed. Students are also encouraged to apply these perspectives to their own development and growth. There is a strong emphasis on the critical thinking skills required to evaluate and utilise psychological theories and perspectives.

    BESC2140 Organisational Behaviour
    This course examines the complex interactions and challenges that can enhance or impede wellbeing in the workplace. Combining the discipline areas of social and cultural psychology with organisational and management theory to examine human behaviour offers a framework for understanding the complexities of the contemporary workplace. Students analyse the various contextual elements of the individual, the group, the organisational system, and society from an interdisciplinary vantage point. Throughout this analytical journey, they learn to unpack how those interacting contexts influence social power relations that define how we operate in the workplace. Contemporary factors including the influence of globalisation are explored in order to analyse the synergies between the local and the global marketplace. Students also reflect on their experiences of work practices and collaboratively develop strategies that address contemporary workplace problems.

    BESC2160 Psychological Perspectives on Health
    Definitions of what is meant by physical and psychological health and wellbeing are explored and critiqued. Drawing on the fields of psychology as well as the political, sociological and cultural sciences, students examine the dominant models of health care and behaviour change theories to explore the meaning, morality, and experiences of health and illness. Issues surrounding the health-illness binary are interrogated in order to identify alternative responses and solutions to promote more inclusive understandings of health and wellbeing. Such an approach challenges the medical model of health care provision and identifies the structural barriers that contribute to ill health and promotes the need for more equitable access to health care.

    BESC2240 Discourse, Power and Politics
    Pre-requisite: BESC1000 Developmental Psychology
    In this course students are introduced to critical theories which examine the sociological, psychological, and cultural aspects of human interaction. Students develop the capacity to critically explore social norms and assumptions and to examine their construction and legitimacy. This process enables them to identify the underlying power dimensions and the implications of these for a just society. Classic and contemporary social psychological theories, concepts, and experiments are examined and provide the stimulus for critical debate and analysis. In particular, the manner in which discourse influences identity construction, subject positioning, and social systems is identified and analysed. Students emerge with a deeper understanding of their own values and beliefs with the potential to become an engaged social critic.

    BESC2250 Culture and Society
    Pre-requisite: BESC2240 Discourse, Power and Politics
    A major focus of this course is to develop what Freire called conscientization, or heightened socio political awareness. Through this lens students will explore the range of definitions associated with the term 'culture' including gender, disability, religion, sexuality and ethnicity. Importantly, they will be encouraged to examine personal, structural and cultural racism as it exists in Australia and more broadly internationally. The political context and purpose of exclusion and marginalisation are examined. In addition, specific cultural competencies are explored and developed.

    BESC2260 Contemporary Family Issues
    This course explores the family as the basic social course within which the individual develops and is socialised. In particular it addresses the Australian family and the socio-demographic changes that have occurred in recent decades. The course will consider the family life cycle and structures and functions that families perform in assisting the development of their members. Topics such as attachment theory, gender identity, communication patterns, parenting and paid work, divorce and stepfamilies, family violence and lifestyle diversity are examined.  The relationship of the family course to the broader social context will be explored. Students are encouraged to consider their own experiences of family life in the ongoing process of socialisation, personal growth and professional development. 
    *Please note: This course is available to students on the Fremantle campus only.

    BESC3020 Community Mental Health
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The constructions of mental health within a critical multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary framework are examined and critiqued. Consideration is given to the challenges associated with mental ill-health such as psychosocial problems; personality disorders; the effects of psychoactive substance use; and addictive behaviours. Questions around diagnosis, treatment, and community responses to mental health are raised to encourage students to move beyond the medicalised definitions that dominate western society. Drawing on Foucauldian theory, students examine the role psychology and the medical professions have played in the construction and maintenance of deviance and abnormality in mental health. In addition, the legal and ethical issues relating to the psychosocial care of people with mental ill-health will be explored.

    BESC3110 Research Methods and Practice
    Pre-requisite: BESC1050 Social Science Research
    This course is designed to provide a scaffolded approach to identifying and understanding the interconnected elements of social science research paradigms. Students will be encouraged to examine the epistemology, theoretical perspective, methodology and methods of qualitative research. Specifically, students will be introduced to the methodologies of Grounded Theory, Discourse Analysis, Auto Ethnography and the theoretical perspectives of Symbolic Interactionism, Feminist Theory, Discourse Theory, and Critical Theory. The applied utility of these approaches will be discussed in relation to transformational social change founded on principles of social justice and human rights. The ability to understand, interpret and undertake multifaceted research is a highly desirable skill in many work environments and the knowledge derived from this course will be highly relevant in graduate employment. It is also a foundation course for those students intending to embark on Honours or higher degree research.

    BESC3120 Beyond Family Violence: Issues & Responses
    This course takes a strengths and capacity based approach to understanding the social issues and context of family violence. It positions family violence within a multileveled framework that explores the complex aetiology and shifts the focus of response from the individual/private realm to the social/public domain. It is designed to provide an overview of 5 forms of family violence including domestic violence, child abuse, parent/adolescent conflict, date rape, and elder abuse. Students will examine the definitions of what constitutes each form of violence as well as the parameters as to what is not considered family violence. The various responses which have been developed will be critically examined at the individual, family, legislative and policy levels.

    BESC3150 Professional Practice in Behavioural Science
    Pre-requisites: BESC2250 Culture and Society
    This is a significant course which focuses on the development of essential skills for independent professional practice.  It incorporates the ethical and legal aspects of professional practice across the individual, relational and community settings. In addition it emphasises concepts of principled reflective practice founded in social justice. This course is a pre requisite for the Behavioural Science internship and must be completed prior to the commencement of the internship

    BESC3930 Community: Policy and Development
    Pre-requisites: BESC2250 Culture and Society
    This course reflects a values based perspective that emphasises human capacity and sustainability. The principles underpinning the course include social justice, respect for diversity and equity. This course demonstrates the benefits of values based praxis and encourages students to challenge the accepted norms within society to identify structural barriers that contribute to disadvantage, and marginalisation. Using a principled practice approach to community development students are encouraged to develop new ways of thinking and working that contribute to community sustainablity and create wellbeing at the individual, relational and community level.

    BESC3940 Behavioural Science Internship
    Pre-requisites:  BESC3150 Professional Practice in Behavioural Science
    The University of Notre Dame, Australia has a strong commitment to community service and the Internship is one important way that this commitment can be honoured.  One of the goals of the Behavioural Science degree is to assist students to develop critical skills for applying theory based learning to a professional environment. By observing skilled professionals, and through their own supervised experience, students apply the principles, theories and values of Behavioural Science in the workplace and begin to develop their understanding of praxis. Reflection on internship experience includes, but is not limited to, the psychological, emotional, sociological, economic, political, legal, cultural and ethical dimensions of working with individuals, groups, organisations and communities.  At the same time, an internship provides opportunities for the development of reasoning and problem solving skills in partnership with experienced practitioners.

  • Counselling

    COUN1001 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 1
    Pre-requisite: COUN1003 Theories & Approaches to Counselling (Part time enrolment)
    Co-requisite: COUN1003 Theories & Approaches to Counselling (Full time enrolment) 
    This course provides students with the skills to develop attributes essential to professional counselling.  Through the exploration of personal values, belief systems and experiences from culture and family, students identify potential factors that may impact their professional practice.  Students are introduced to theories of self-care, and strategies such as meditation, mindfulness and other stress-reducing techniques and practices.  This course is conducted in a group setting, facilitated by a professional counsellor and is supported by scholarly literature on professional development and ethical practice for counsellors.

    COUN1002 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 2
    Pre-requisite: COUN1001 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 1
    This course provides students with the skills to develop attributes essential to professional counselling.  Through the exploration of personal values, belief systems and experiences from culture and family, students analyse potential personal factors that may impact their professional practice.  Students develop and practise self-care strategies.  This course is conducted in a group setting, facilitated by a professional counsellor and is supported by scholarly literature on professional development and ethical practice for counsellors.

    COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    This course introduces students to therapeutic approaches that guide counselling practice such as Psychoanalytic Theory, Existential Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, and Behavioural Approaches. There is a particular emphasis on the role and importance of the ‘therapeutic alliance’. Students are introduced to the codes of practice covering ethical and professional obligations of counsellors.

    COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    In this course students learn and perform key interviewing skills using a micro skills hierarchy: listening, asking questions, reflecting, clarifying, challenging, and structuring an interview session. The micro skills hierarchy is designed to draw out client stories and issues through a basic listening sequence, leading to client change and positive action.

    COUN2000 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 3 
    Pre-requisite: COUN1002 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 2 
    This course provides students with the skills to develop attributes essential to professional counselling.    Students expand their self-awareness and explore the choices available to them in significant relational areas of their lives. Students practice self-care strategies.  This course is conducted in a group setting, facilitated by a professional counsellor and is supported by scholarly literature on professional development and ethical practice for counsellors.

    COUN2001 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 4
    Pre-requisite: COUN2000 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 3
    This course provides students with the skills to develop attributes essential to professional counselling.  Through the exploration of developmental lifespan experiences, students analyse potential personal issues that may impact their professional practice.  Students facilitate self-care strategies.   This course is conducted in a group setting, facilitated by a professional counsellor and is supported by scholarly literature on professional development and ethical practice for counsellors.

    COUN2002 Counselling Skills Training 2
    Pre-requisite: COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course builds on the understanding of the microskills hierarchy. Students evaluate the problem-management opportunity development model of counselling. This is achieved in part by the analysis of scholarly and professional literature. Opportunities for skills evaluation, and feedback on counselling skills are provided by in-class and recorded role-plays and through reflective journaling.

    COUN2003 Counselling Skills Training 3
    Pre-requisite: COUN2002 Counselling Skills Training 2
    This course builds on the skills acquired in earlier Counselling skills training courses. Students focus on interpersonal skills needed to identify and work with client resistance, develop empathic understanding, build a working alliance, and promote the use of the therapeutic relationship as an organising focus for treatment. Through the analysis of scholarly and professional literature, students demonstrate in role play and reflective journaling their ability to develop and use the therapeutic relationship as the foundation of therapeutic change.

    COUN2004 Counselling and Children
    Pre-requisite: COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1 & COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    This course equips students with the therapeutic approaches, skills and attributes needed to be an effective counsellor with children. A developmental perspective is used to illustrate how childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a lifelong impact on health and wellbeing. The potential connection between unaddressed, adverse experiences and social problems is investigated.

    COUN2005 Grief and Loss Counselling
    Pre-requisite: COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1 & COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    In this course students explore the key theoretical concepts used to explain the nature of attachment, loss and grief. It highlights the characteristics of normal or uncomplicated grief and complicated or pathological grief. The course focuses on the grieving process and the mediators of mourning. Consideration is given to special types of losses. Distinction is made between grief counselling, used to facilitate uncomplicated grief, and grief therapy used to facilitate complicated grief.

    COUN2006 Counselling Adolescents
    Pre-requisite: COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1 & COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    This course explores the therapeutic approaches and skills needed to be an effective counsellor with adolescents. A developmental approach is used to understand the process of adolescence from a biological, psychological, societal and cognitive perspective. The course identifies the common challenges faced by adolescents and explores therapeutic approaches to address these. Through the use of role plays, case studies, small group discussions, and lectures, this course provides practical opportunities for students to conduct assessments and design therapeutic responses for adolescents.

    COUN2007 Trauma and Addiction Counselling
    Pre-requisite: COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1 & COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    This course addresses contemporary issues, theories and approaches that support successful counselling outcomes for clients adversely affected by trauma and addictions. Trauma counselling assists people who are affected by traumatic events and/or crises to manage issues that create emotional difficulties or psychological disturbance. Addiction counselling assists people affected by alcohol and other drugs. Theories and approaches for assisting family members of those affected by addictions are also addressed.

    COUN2150 Counselling Children and Adolescents
    Pre-requisite: COUN1030 Theories and Approaches to Counselling OR COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course will help the student develop a framework for understanding the different concepts, theories and issues involved in working with children and adolescents. The student will be encouraged to understand the world of the child from varying theoretical and developmental perspectives as well as becoming familiar with the major theories of adolescent development.  Students will develop an understanding of the different communication and counselling skills required for working with children and adolescents.

    COUN3000 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 5
    Pre-requisite: COUN2001 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 4 
    This course provides students with the skills to develop attributes essential to professional counselling and group facilitation.  Through the exploration of the theory and practice of group therapy, students identify potential personal issues that may impact their professional practice.  Students analyse theoretical approaches to group dynamics, interpersonal learning and interpersonal relationships. This course is conducted in a group setting, facilitated by a professional counsellor and is supported by scholarly literature on group facilitation and ethical practice for counsellors.

    COUN3001 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 6
    Pre-requisite: COUN3000 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 5 
    This course provides students with the skills to develop attributes essential to professional counselling and group facilitation.  Through exploration of the theory and practice of group facilitation, students analyse potential personal issues that may impact their professional practice.  Students design and facilitate a group structure using theoretical approaches to group dynamics, interpersonal learning and interpersonal relationships. This course is conducted in a group setting, facilitated by a professional counsellor and is supported by scholarly literature on group facilitation and ethical practice for counsellors.

    COUN3002 Placement and Supervision A
    Pre-requisite: COUN2001 Formation of the Professional Counsellor 4 (run in Fremantle only), COUN2002 Counselling Skills Training 2 (run in Fremantle only)
    Students undertake a clinical counselling placement with a community agency.  While on placement, students apply counselling skills underpinned by their understanding of professional practice. Students also attend a clinical supervision group on campus where placement case studies are examined and evaluated to ensure counselling best practice. Drawing on their previous learning and current placement experience, students develop a portfolio of competencies that integrates theory and consolidates their professional skills. The placement and supervision courses are the capstone courses for Counselling students.

    COUN3003 Placement and Supervision B
    Pre-requisite: COUN3002 Placement and Supervision A
    Students undertake a clinical counselling placement with a community agency. While on placement, students apply counselling skills underpinned by their understanding of professional practice. Students also attend a clinical supervision group on campus where placement case studies are examined and evaluated to ensure counselling best practice. Drawing on their previous learning and current placement experience, students develop a portfolio of competencies that integrates theory and consolidates their professional skills. The placement and supervision courses are the capstone courses for Counselling students.

    COUN3004 Counselling Couples and Families
    Pre-requisite: COUN2002 Counselling Skills Training 2 (run in Fremantle only)
    This course examines the therapeutic approaches, skills, and attributes needed to counsel couples and families. A systemic perspective is used to understand couples and families as social systems. The course identifies the challenges faced by couples and families and explores therapeutic approaches to address these. Through the use of role plays, case studies, discussions, and lectures this course provides practical opportunities for students to conduct assessments, design therapeutic responses and apply their counselling skills and knowledge for couples and families.

    COUN3005 Counselling Older People 
    Pre-requisite: COUN2002 Counselling Skills Training 2 (run in Fremantle only)
    This course explores the therapeutic approaches, skills and attributes needed to be an effective counsellor with older people. A developmental perspective is used to understand the process of aging from a physical, psychological, cognitive and spiritual perspective. The course identifies the challenges faced by older people and evaluates individual and group therapeutic approaches to address these challenges. Through the use of role plays, case studies, small group discussion and lectures, students acquire the skills and knowledge to conduct assessments and design therapeutic responses for older people.

    COUN3160 Counselling in High Prevalence Mental Health Disorders
    Pre-requisite: COUN10030 Theories and Approaches to Counselling OR COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    Students who work with clients experiencing mental health problems require a level of understanding of these conditions that allows them to provide counselling in a competent and confident manner. This course will teach students concepts of mental wellbeing and mental illness consistent with the recovery model. Topics will include affective disorders, including depression and anxiety, and more serious mental illnesses, including the psychoses. This course will increase students knowledge of high prevalence mental health disorders and how best to manage clients through Counselling interventions.  This course will place an emphasis on the therapeutic alliance when counselling clients with mental health issues. Rogerian concepts of compassion, empathy, and unconditional positive regard are emphasized

    COUN5030 Counselling Couples and Families
    This course examines counselling issues that relate to working with couples and families. Firstly, it will examine family systems and structure, family development stages and changes, and the family as a social system. Secondly, it will look at the basic models of couple and family counselling and therapy. The family systems, experiential, developmental, and cognitive-behavioural models will be looked at. Thirdly, it will address assessment and interventions with couples and family issues that are typically presented in counselling. The family issues are family separation, parenting including step parenting, adolescent and behavioural problems, drug and alcohol use, grief and loss. The couple issues that will be dealt with are intimacy, sexuality, marital conflict, ambivalence, affairs and communication difficulties in relationships.

    COUN5110 Trauma Counselling
    Trauma counselling is an often misused generic term. It refers to an interpersonal counselling process in which the counsellor assists a person affected by a traumatic event or crisis to problem-solve or manage the issues, which have created emotional difficulties or psychological disturbance. Many counsellors are called upon to provide trauma counselling as part of their professional practice. The provision of structured, short-term assistance to people in the aftermath of traumatic events requires a range of knowledge and skills in order to meet the needs of those affected.
    *Please note: This course is available to students on the Fremantle campus only.

    COUN5500 Counselling Skills for the Professions
    Many of the skills used in counselling are desirable for ones repertoire even if one is not a Professional Counsellor.  There are many situations in business and the professions where these skills can enhance relationships and improve work culture.  Education, Social Work, Counselling, Nursing, and Law are good examples of where these skills could be used.  Skills include listening, asking questions, reflecting, clarifying, challenging, and structuring the interview/session.

    COUN5990 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Master of Counselling
    Counsellors need to be familiar with the philosophical and theoretical approaches, which guide their practice.  Many different approaches are used in counselling, depending on how the client presents with his or her problem.  This course addresses a broad range of theories, including: Psychoanalytic Theory, Existential Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, and Behavioural approaches.

    COUN6000 Interpersonal Group Practice
    This course examines contemporary theories of group work. Students gain an understanding of group dynamics and group processes. Students participate in an experiential group designed to provide opportunities to analyse the group's experiences by applying group theory.

    COUN6001 Counselling Skills
    This course develops advanced skills in counselling, drawing on the interpersonal skills postgraduate students acquired from professional practice and/or academic study. The course consists of demonstration, direct teaching and supervised practice in the performance of counselling skills. The course integrates a client-focused approach to counselling, linking theoretical foundations of counselling with counselling skills.

    COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling
    In this course students analyse the philosophical and theoretical frameworks guiding counselling practice. Students select appropriate evidence-based contemporary approaches based on client presentations.

    COUN6003 Approaches to Mental Health
    This course examines common mental health issues encountered in counselling practice. Students examine issues such as anxiety, depression, addictions, suicide prevention and mental health stigma. They apply contemporary research to case conceptualisation and treatment planning.

    COUN6004 Theory and Practice of Group Facilitation
    In this course students learn the theory and practice of designing and facilitating an effective therapeutic group. The course examines managing difficulties that arise in groups, designing appropriate interventions and working with diverse groups.

    COUN6005 Family Systems and Couples
    This course examines counselling issues that relate to working with couples and families. Firstly, it examines family systems and structure, family development stages and changes, and the family as a social system. Secondly, it looks at the basic models of couples and family counselling and therapy. The family systems, experiential, developmental and cognitive behavioural models are considered. Finally, the various assessments and interventions with couples and family issues that are typically presented in counselling are addressed.

    COUN6006 Placement, Supervision and Case Studies A
    Pre-requisites: COUN6001 Counselling Skills, COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling
    In this course students work with clients through an industry placement.   Students reflect on the counselling process under the guidance of an experienced professional. Approaches to counselling are discussed, as are plans for each client session.

    COUN6007 Placement, Supervision and Case Studies B
    Pre-requisites: COUN6006 Placement, Supervision & Case Studies A
    In this course students work with clients through an industry placement. Students reflect on the counselling process under the guidance of an experienced professional. Approaches to counselling are discussed, as are plans for each client session.

    COUN6008 Professional Practice
    Pre-requisites: COUN6001 Counselling Skills, COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling, COUN6003 Approaches to Mental Health
    This course introduces students to the codes of practice covering professional, social and legal obligations of counsellors. Counselling in a cross-cultural context is examined. Students analyse the professional practice literature and apply their findings to diverse populations via case studies.

    COUN6009 Trauma, Loss and Grief Counselling
    This course examines historical and contemporary approaches to understanding trauma, loss and grief. It provides students with assessment and intervention skills to work effectively in these areas of counselling. Students apply theory to assess case studies and in role plays. The topics of vicarious trauma and burnout, and the development of self-care plans are also examined.

    COUN6010 Specialised Counselling Approaches
    Pre-requisites: COUN6001 Counselling Skills, COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling
    Two contemporary approaches to counselling practice are explored in this course, resulting in a detailed study of each. Students develop advanced skills in assessment and intervention, based on these specific approaches. Students apply counselling skills acquired in other courses to these approaches.

    COUN6011 From Theory to Practice
    This course aims to expand the understanding and practice of students as Counsellors.  Students will consider such issues as cognitive distortions and awareness of feelings and the manner in which these might affect the counselling process.  Students will learn how to create a safe environment in which both the counsellor and client can operate and will assess, evaluate and apply change-oriented, activity based interventions.  This course provides students with an opportunity to critically examine aspects of counselling practice, and to apply to it the findings of contemporary research. In addition, students will be encouraged to use core reflection to enhance their professional growth.

    COUNSELLING MASTERS

    ARTS5010 Research Methods
    This course provides a broad exposure to the principal forms of social science research used in counselling, educational and related social sciences. As such, it provides a basic foundation in research design, methods, data collection and data analysis for higher degree students planning to proceed to a dissertation or thesis. At the same time, it offers a general understanding of research design and methodological issues for professionals who may be required to commission investigations or approve proposals for study by others, and who need to be able to interpret and critically evaluate the findings of published research. Students gain experience in a range of qualitative and quantitative techniques which can be used by practising professionals to carry out individual or team-based action-research into issues arising from their own work settings, organisations, or wider professional activities. Emphasis is on differentiating between, and making appropriate and justified choices among, the principal paradigms or methodological approaches used by contemporary social science researchers.

    ARTS5011 Research Methods
    This course provides a broad exposure to the principal forms of social science research used in counselling, educational and related social sciences. As such, it provides a basic foundation in research design, methods, data collection and data analysis for higher degree students planning to proceed to a dissertation or thesis. At the same time, it offers a general understanding of research design and methodological issues for professionals who may be required to commission investigations or approve proposals for study by others, and who need to be able to interpret and critically evaluate the findings of published research. Students gain experience in a range of qualitative and quantitative techniques which can be used by practising professionals to carry out individual or team-based action-research into issues arising from their own work settings, organisations, or wider professional activities. Emphasis is on differentiating between, and making appropriate and justified choices among, the principal paradigms or methodological approaches used by contemporary social science researchers.

  • Communications and Media

    COMM1060 Media and Society
    This course explores how media texts engage the media consumer and influence the consumer’s notion of reality. It will enable students to consider their own way of thinking about the media and society.  Media theory will enable students to use analytical principles to deconstruct and analyse the media. Students will be encouraged to read print media, listen to radio, browse the Internet and watch television through critical eyes, appreciating the art, skill and power of media representations.

    COMM1210 Introduction to Screen Production
    This course introduces students to the basic skills and theories required in the production of film and television. Students will research, write, shoot and edit short videos using the latest digital technology.

    COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course is an introduction to the nature and various aspects of daily journalism, and the fundamental issues in the practice of reporting. This course has a practical emphasis. Students are introduced to news values including the ‘who, what, when, where, why and how’—labelled famously the ‘5 W’s and H’—as well as to various approaches to the writing of news and the Journalists’ Code of Ethics. Through a variety of tasks, students will learn to compose hard news copy for publication, develop effective research, and hone interviewing and writing skills. Students will also analyse daily journalism with a focus on news and current affairs.

    COMM2010 Production: Creative Advertising
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course explores the creative dimensions of advertising. Students will be taught methodologies to deliver creative content. They will develop advertising concepts and explore the production dimensions of advertising beyond the storyboard. Students will develop creative concepts for advertising campaigns, engage imaginatively with agency briefs, and work with advertising professionals to develop their skills. This course will be of interest to students seeking to enter either the strategic or creative side of the advertising and communications industry.

    COMM2020 Screenwriting
    This course introduces the student to the fundamental building blocks of screenwriting with a focus on the art of story creation. From the conception of the seed idea, the structuring of a storyline, to the development of a treatment, this course considers the principle that skilful story making is the indispensable foundation of a successful script. Students are expected to participate in workshop exercises, analysis of films and stories, and produce a volume of creative writing culminating in the submission of a detailed short screenplay.

    COMM2030 Language of Film
    This course will introduce students to the lexicon of film and the diverse techniques through which films generate meaning. The course will encompass major movements in film history and theory: Silent to Sound, Auteur and Genre Theory, Transnational Cinemas, and the Digital Revolution in Cinema. It will challenge students to think analytically about the ways in which films construct meaning, including the uses of cinematography, editing, art direction, screenplay and sound. The course will denaturalise and deconstruct the proverbial magic of the silver screen, firmly locating film within its cultural and ideological discourses. This course is specifically designed to equip students with the analytical tools required for the Film and Screen Production major and is, therefore, a prerequisite for a number of upper level Communications and Media courses.

    COMM2040 Digital Cultures
    This course investigates new media as a social practice in contemporary society. Utilising media and cultural studies frameworks, the course introduces advanced concepts in new media theory, including analysis of new media languages, narrative theory, audience studies, and participatory media culture. Students will gain an understanding of the theoretical concepts underpinning new media research, gaining insight into the construction of user producers and participatory audiences, as well as the ways in which online, portable and social media interact with the traditional forms of film, television and radio. This course is designed to enhance a student’s specialisation in the study of screen production, journalism and media. Students from related disciplines with an interest in understanding new media as a reflection of social practice will also find this course relevant to their area of study.

    COMM2150 Screen Production: Skills and Practice
    This course provides students with an opportunity to further develop skills in screen production.  Using industry standard techniques, students will collaborate in workshops which focus on camera use, lighting, sound, editing and production management.  This course provides essential skills for those students who wish to pursue further screen production courses in the specialisation.

    COMM2260 Digital Photography
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 25 units of credit of prior learning
    This course consists of lectures, workshops, and hands-on experience covering the artistic and practical aspects of picture taking, digital image processing, and image presentation using digital single lens reflex cameras, software image manipulation and presentation software.
    Students will capture digital images, store files in various formats, manipulate their images to maximize their appearance and create an online portfolio of their work.

    COMM2300 Digital Media Production
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 50 units of credit of prior learning
    This course introduces students to the field of digital media production. It aims to develop core competencies in the design and production of digital media that will enable students to participate effectively in a range of digital environments. Skills will be taught in a media lab. Students will work individually and within groups on creative media works, including video, audio and web design. The course is informed by recent transformations in media technologies, media convergence and participatory culture.

    COMM2330 Journalism for Television and Video
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course focuses on the theory and practice of electronic journalism. It teaches the skills required in television and new media reporting including planning, researching, filming, editing, scripting, interviewing, voice work and presentation. This course complements screen and print media courses, and equips students for advanced studies in journalism and media. It will also look at the legal and ethical aspects of television and video journalism.

    COMM2340 Journalism: Theory and Practice
    In this course students develop their knowledge of the theories and practices of journalism. They develop practical skills including researching, interviewing, and writing for print, broadcast and online journalism. The course also includes the application of media ethics and law, and the role of the media as the ‘Fourth Estate’.

    COMM3008 Communications Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Communications internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    COMM3040 Feature Writing
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course introduces students to longer form journalism, focusing on the production of features in print and online. Students will build their reporting and writing skills by pursuing stories in greater depth and from new creative perspectives. Critical analysis of the variety of feature stories is central to the course. This course aims to build students’ knowledge of the structures and styles available to the writer, including voice, language, narrative technique, and - where appropriate - the use of images and sound.

    COMM3050 Media Ethics and Law
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 50 units of credit of prior learning
    The media is shaped by laws, regulations and ethical codes, which reflect underlying political, social, cultural and economic debates. This course explores these debates and how they have shaped issues such as freedom of speech, censorship, defamation, vilification, copyright and privacy. Students will investigate and compare different regulatory approaches, examine current legal and ethical debates, and discuss what our assumptions about media law and ethics tell us about ourselves and our society.

    COMM3060 Online Newsroom
    Pre-requisite: COMM2340 Journalism: Theory and Practice
    This capstone course replicates the processes and management structures of a newsroom to produce content for an online publication. The course draws together all previous subjects in the Journalism Major resulting in a final project and ePortfolio to showcase students' skills. Students will learn subediting and content management skills which will be used to develop submitted work into publication-ready content.  Students will further develop their professional and practical skills in research, writing and production by creating original content for the website. This course will provide students with an opportunity to apply journalism skills ethically and to manage projects to strict deadlines while being reflective about their practice.

    COMM3070 Photojournalism
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course will build on introductory skills in journalism to acquaint students with the theory and skills regarding photography as a form of journalism.  Students will examine the role of the photograph in print and other forms of media, and consider critically its power to tell a story and interpret truth.  This course will cover such themes as history, war, social movements, race, poverty, power and gender.  Students will be required to generate images of a publishable quality for their portfolios.

    COMM3090 Adaptation Studies
    This course interrogates the theory and practice of adaptation across multiple forms, genres, and media platforms, including the adaptation of print, screen, and performance-based texts. It challenges students to think critically and creatively about the construction of cultural meaning in both classic and non-traditional adaptations, including problems associated with period and genre shifts, and narrative play. It draws together critical theory from literary, film and digital studies as well as the interdisciplinary field of adaptation studies.

    COMM3210 Interactive Media
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 50 units of credit of prior learning
    This course develops core competencies in the design and production of digital media. Students develop skills, understanding and knowledge necessary to work in a creative media environment. Students work on projects individually or in teams. Recent and on-going transformations in media technologies and participatory culture are studied. Students gain an understanding of the multi-faceted media industry from different perspectives.

    COMM3260 Advanced Screen Production: Documentary
    Pre-requisite: COMM2150 Screen Production: Skills and Practice
    This course in advanced screen production skills will see students collaborate on the research, development and production of a short documentary film.   Workshops will focus on the varying practical and stylistic approaches to executing works of non-fiction using industry standard techniques and the latest broadcast quality equipment.

    COMM3270 Advanced Screen Production: Drama
    Pre-requisite: COMM2150 Screen Production: Skills and Practice
    In this course, students, working in crews and using broadcast standard technology, participate in key film crew roles, assigned in consultation with their lecturer, to make short films or TV dramas. The substantial processes of pre-production, production and post-production are assessable and students are graded on the basis of significant work in their designated roles. Production scripts generated in other Film and Screen Production courses may be used.

    COMM3300 Documentary Studies
    This course will examine the development of the documentary from its origins to the present day. Students will explore theoretical and practical issues related to screen documentary through readings, screenings and class discussions.  Case studies will range from cinema vérité and expository documentary through to mock documentary and emerging modes. Major documentary theorists and practitioners will be considered, as will underlying issues ranging from ethical considerations involved in representing reality and other cultures, to the place of documentary in a future of global and technological convergence.

    COMM3510 Advertising and Society
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines the communication process between media text and audience at an advanced level. The course  examines major theoretical issues in communication studies, with an emphasis on the persuasive power of media. The course includes a detailed study of persuasion in advertising, as well as a broader look at the communication process at work in a range of media texts. The communication protocols of analysts, consumers, and fans is considered to bring issues of readership into the analytical equation.

    COMM3630 Australian Cinema
    This course will examine both historical and contemporary Australian films.  Students will consider the means by which cinema is an expression of Australian history and culture, as well as how film provides a medium through which our society and national identity might be interpreted.  Films considered will deal with such themes as legend and myth, suburban Australia, Aboriginality, Anzac, and the bush, the city and the beach.  Finally, this course will examine how Australian film has been both influenced by and an influence on international cinema.

    COMM3700 Radio
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course examines the theory and practice of radio journalism in a rapidly evolving media environment. Students research, plan and produce radio news and current affairs programs within professional legal and ethical parameters.

  • English Literature

    ENGL1020 The Western Literary Tradition
    Representative selections from poetry, drama and fiction, from Chaucer to the present, provide students with a broad background to Literature in English. The course places emphasis on the development and critical analysis of literary forms and genres. Students who complete the course successfully are in a sound position to make appropriate choices of courses for further study of Literatures in English.

    ENGL1040 World Literatures Today
    A variety of oral and written texts in English provides an introduction to the richness and diversity of the Literature program at Notre Dame Australia. Texts from different countries across the world are incorporated in the course. Students consider contemporary issues such as race, ethnicity and gender, and the way meanings are constructed from a vast and disparate body of writing in the context of the global village. The course also offers a basic introduction to Literary Theory.

    ENGL1050 Theory and Practice of Modern Theatre 
    This course examines popular dramatic forms from the mid nineteenth century to the more contemporary plays of the early twentieth century. It examines realism and naturalism and the audience reaction to them and how social change and pressure contributed to the emergence of Expressionism, Surrealism, Absurdism and Epic Theatre. There is a focus on critical analysis of texts as well as opportunities to further enhance understanding through performance. Teaching mode includes lectures, tutorials and performance workshops.

    ENGL3000 Children's Literature
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    In this course, students examine literature told to or written for children and adolescents. The course takes an historic, generic and thematic approach and asks how children and their literature have been and are conceptualized as we move into the twenty-first century. Is children’s literature a cultural artefact or a means by which culture defines itself? What is the changing nature of the adult-child relationship? How do we discern and evaluate a poetics of Children’s Literature? Students examine oral tradition as well as the written tradition and screen adaptations.

    ENGL3008 English Literature Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of ENGL prior learning
    English Literature internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    ENGL3010 The Uses and Abuses of Literary Theory
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Contemporary literary theory and criticism affords us a plethora of ways to view and make sense of social, cultural and political trends, as well as challenging notions of literature and literariness. What do we understand by 'text'? What assumptions do we bring to the study of literature, and to the acts of reading and writing? How ideologically innocent are our critical judgements? The course asks these and other questions and considers the contribution of the likes of key literary theorists in formulating a response. The course involves a range of approaches to a limited number of texts.

    ENGL3060 Australian Theatre 
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines some of the greatest examples of Australian theatre from the mid‐nineteenth century to the present day. Students explore dramatic styles employed by Australian playwrights and the power of theatre in Australian literary and popular culture, and may also consider how they compare to the creative works of Australian cinema and television.  Students also examine how Australian plays express a variety of important themes, in what fashion they might be an expression of history and culture, and how they reflect our society.

    ENGL3070 Irish Literature and the idea of 'Ireland'
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Irish literature offers a unique insight into Ireland’s struggle for cultural and national identity, canvassing the relationship between nation and narration, an understanding of which is vital to all nations. What constitutes ‘literature’ and what is ‘Irish’? What should and should not be included in a canon of a national literature, and by whom? As a group of writings written largely in a non-native language and often written outside the country during a period of prolonged colonial subjugation, this is a complex and contested category of writing. The course begins with an examination of key texts from earlier periods; from the seminal work of St Patrick in the fifth century to the influence of Celtic mythology and Pagan literature, leading to the emergence of early Christian literature. The latter part of the course focuses on the late eighteenth to late twentieth centuries. It includes a variety of important figures, such as W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, Flann O’Brien, Julia O’Faolain, and Seamus Heaney, across a range of narrative forms. Students critically examine texts from this exceptional body of work, asking what role writers have played and continue to play in understanding the idea of ‘Ireland’.

    ENGL3080 Italy and the Renaissance
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Italy was where the early modern Renaissance began as a new vision for recovering the ancient world. The beginnings and development of this extraordinary cultural movement in Italy were manifested in its literature, visual arts, architecture, music, political thought, philosophy and religion.  This course traces through Italian literature and other forms of expression how the Renaissance rose and flourished in Italy; how its influence spread across Europe, and Britain in particular; and how it changed western civilization.  This course is well suited to students of English Literature and/or Italian Studies and is an ideal complement to such other discipline areas as History and Theatre Studies.

    ENGL3100 The Art and Craft of Travel Writing
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    In this course students engage with the academic as well as the creative process as a means of better understanding the art and craft of travel writing. Such writing is an exercise in deciphering and understanding self, place and society. Through detailed examination of key aspects of the craft, students will develop critical understandings of the significant themes and methods of travel writing in both historical and contemporary contexts.  The course enhances communication skills and technical competence and promotes critical and reflective thinking in an interdisciplinary context.

    ENGL3160 Australian Literature And The Post Colonial Challenge
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    A focus on exciting and innovative developments in Australian fiction, poetry and drama since is a feature of this course. A study is made of the movement away from the intense nationalism and the realism characteristic of Australian literature in the early years of the twentieth century. Students consider the ways in which the spiritual and cultural uncertainties of contemporary Australian life are reflected in the literature and film of the period and explore contemporary attitudes to history, myth, memory, imagination and a changing awareness of 'place' in the national consciousness.

    ENGL3310 Classical and Romantic Poetry
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course covers the period in English poetry from the Elizabethan age to the early decades of the twentieth century. Representative forms and genres are considered, including epic, narrative and lyrical poetry and the nature and purpose of verse satire. The course includes a study of the social and intellectual context of English poetry during this period.

    ENGL3320 The Novel in English
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course covers the evolution and development of the novel in English. How has literary experimentation altered the genre? How and why has English emerged to better suit the needs of contemporary writers in a broader context? Students will study the relationship between selected novels and the historical, social and cultural context in which they were written. The implications of contemporary literary theory will also be examined as students critically approach the works of select novelists.

    ENGL3410 Drama in the Age of Shakespeare
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course involves a close study of a significant number of Shakespeare’s histories, tragedies and comedies. These plays are considered in the context of the variety of Elizabethan and Jacobean stages for which they were written, and on which they were performed. The plays of Shakespeare are studied in the context of the comedies and tragedies of some of his contemporaries.

    ENGL3510 Comparative Indigenous Literature
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Particular attention is paid in this course to works by Native North American, New Zealand Maori and Aboriginal Australian peoples. Students examine cultural, spiritual and socio-political issues arising from the creation and production of indigenous literatures, as well as anglo-european socially and historically conditioned readings of them. The course focuses on the dynamic use of language in indigenous oral and written literatures and the development of forms of language better suited to their purposes than those traditionally promulgated by mainstream Western society. Students examine some of the various sorts of aboriginal English in relation to the process of (self) representation and genre adaptation. The often problematic relationship between Literary Theory and indigenous literature is also considered.

    ENGL3820 Freedom from Oppression: Literature that changed the world
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course focuses on the power of words and the dynamic nature of literature in the context of the political nature of the acts of reading and writing. How useful are they in the ongoing battle for freedom and basic human rights? The course examines some of the fiction and non-fiction written in English and originating in diverse areas across the globe. It considers the role of this literature in framing peoples’ experiences and helping them to make sense of their political, religious and physical landscapes. The course explores how we ‘read’ history in the making, how we separate it from cultural mythology, and the place of literature in efforts to achieve meaningful and lasting dialogue within and between torn and divided communities. Importantly, the course asks what is freedom’ and what is ‘oppression’. How fine is the line which divides them? How are individuals and nations (dis)empowered through the use of the written and spoken word? Indeed, what is ‘power’?

  • Greek

    GREK1210 Ancient Greece: Origins and Developments
    (Consult with Greek Lecturer through the School of Arts & Sciences)
    This course offers an opportunity for students to explore and analyse the origins of the ancient Greeks and of ancient Greek society. The emergence of the world of Ancient Greece will be traced through surviving documents and monuments.
    *Please note: This course is available to students on the Fremantle campus only.

    GREK3020 Advanced Greek: Translation
    Pre-requisite: GREK2010 Modern Greek (Intermediate) OR GREK2020 Modern Greek II (Intermediate)
    In this course students will work with advanced level texts in Modern Greek to develop their language skills. A range of texts, both written and oral, including literary and media texts, will be studied. Students will learn to translate for meaning rather than a literal word for word approach. Special emphasis will be devoted to syntax and grammar to create meaningful translations of the texts.

    GREK3310 Modern Greek and The Global Economy
    Pre-requisite: GREK1010 Modern Greek (Beginners) OR GREK1020 Modern Greek II (Beginners)
    In this course students consolidate their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills to communicate in familiar and complex situations. Students read, analyse and discuss texts, in Greek, on topics related to business and the economy. They deliver short presentations and essays, in Greek, connected with these topics.

  • History

    HIST1000 A History of Western Civilisation
    This course looks at the rise of what is commonly referred to as ‘Western Civilisation’.  Tracing the development of western society from the ancient world to the twenty-first century, it interrogates assumptions that underpin popular perceptions of the West and explores what it means to be ‘civilised’ and ‘western’. It encourages students to reassess the West’s interactions with diverse non-western cultures and introduces students to simple historiographical issues. This course provides a strong base for historical study in all fields of history and critical thought, requiring students to engage with concepts such as civilisation, empire, dark ages, enlightenment, democracy, colonisation and modernisation.  In addition, students will consider such fundamental issues as the politics and construction of western history, the use of evidence and sources by historians, and the skills and practice of history itself.

    HIST1001 Making Australian History
    In a little over two centuries since the arrival of the first European settlers, Australians have transformed the face of their continent. This course begins by looking at the social, environmental and military consequences of the 18th century decision to build a British convict society on aboriginal land. To what extent were the colonists successful in recreating the political world and social inequalities of British society in the antipodes? How did the Australian people forge a new identity in the land that Wentworth called a ‘New Britannia’ and Henry Lawson described as a ‘young tree green’.  This course turns common perceptions about Australian history on its head, searching for the origins of modern Australian identity in the tumultuous, inspiring and extraordinary stories of eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth century Australia.  In addition to this, students will consider such fundamental issues as the politics and manufacture of history in Australia, the use of evidence and sources by historians, and the skills and practice of history itself.  This course is ideally suited to students planning to take a major in history or preparing to teach within the national curriculum framework, and will be a useful elective to complement studies in a wide range of disciplines offered by the University.

    HIST2001 Unearthing the Past: The History and Archaeology of Western Australia
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course will explore the history of Australia's western third from European settlement in 1829 to the present. It is a story, which is influenced by the state's isolation and enormous size. This course examines in some detail such issues as the Swan River colony's place in the British Empire, frontier wars between Aborigines and Europeans, the brutal nature of the convict system. Western Australian patrician families, the desperate expansion of the gold boom, Western Australia's experience on the home front during WWI and WWII, migration, the Court years, native title and the search for black-white reconciliation. For decades Australian history has been told from the perspective of the writers and social observers of the eastern states; this course turns that interpretation on its head by examining western perspectives of the nation. The course will embrace the application of other disciplines such as politics and archaeology in its interpretation of the state's past. It will also draw extensively from the local history, which infuses the Notre Dame campus in Fremantle. This course includes an Archaeological Dig during the mid-semester break.

    HIST2003 Modern America: From Slave Nation to Superpower
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course looks at major developments in modern American history from the declaration of independence in 1776, to its emergence as a global superpower in the aftermath of World War Two. The course develops chronologically and thematically, looking at the ideas and events which have shaped modern America. In this context, Puritanism, slavery, the ‘wild west’, civil rights, and anti-communism are examined in relation to their impact on American society. A series of ‘American portraits’ also provide an insight into the social history of the men and women who have made America. Beyond the glitz of the White House and the horror of the civil war, we also look at the other side of the ‘American dream’, examining how issues of race, poverty and ethnicity have affected the great ‘melting pot’ of the USA.

    HIST2004 Of Vice and Virtue: Social Change in Victorian Britain
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Victorian Britain was a time of dramatic social transformation. Industrialisation had people on the move: from rural to urban; from fields to factories; and from obscurity to middle class. Entrepreneurial initiatives meant prosperity and upward mobility for many; but for others migration to overpopulated towns and cities meant only poverty, disease and death.  It was an era of impetus and opportunity for social change, though its society held stark contradictions.  Victorian ‘values’ meant moral restraint, yet prostitution thrived.  Aspirational self-improvement was expected, yet the class system imposed non-conducive, debilitating living conditions.   In seeking to understand this extraordinary time of social change, this course examines the fascinating vices and virtues of Victorian Britain.

    HIST2008 The Caesars
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The Caesars explores the political and historical climax of one of the greatest empires the world has seen. This course investigates the origins of the political turmoil in the late Roman Republic which led to the rise of Julius Caesar. Caesar’s brutal assassination and the bloody civil wars that followed will be examined, as well as the triumph of his adopted son, Emperor Augustus. Finally, the course examines his earnest, crazed, manipulative and at times misunderstood successors, the Julio-Claudians, who cemented authoritarian rule throughout the empire. Students have the opportunity to explore a critical period of history in-depth, and to interpret key historical sources.

    HIST2009 The Kennedys: America in the 60s
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The Kennedys were at the heart of America in the 1960s, shaping much of the nation’s social, political, economic, foreign policy and spiritual values.  Theirs was an extraordinary decade in history, and the social and political change it experienced continues to reverberate. Abroad, the United States experienced major collisions of the Cold War, escalated its involvement in the Vietnam War, and committed deeply to the Space Race. At home, conservatives were confronted by the civil rights movement, the rise of the Left, youth rebellions, the anti-war movement, a ‘war on poverty’ and a ‘sexual revolution’—all of which radically changed America.  Students of this course will find that the story of the Kennedys—America’s most iconic family—opens a window to the nation’s story at its most critical chapter.

    HIST2013 A History of Ancient Greece
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    A History of Ancient Greece explores the origin and nature of one of the world's most unique ancient cultures.  This course investigates the political, military, social and cultural development of Greek civilisation from its earliest foundations at Crete and Mycenae to the triumph of the city-states of Athens and Sparta and finally through to the Hellenistic World. Themes may include empire, trade, religion, colonisation, gender, art, literature, the evolution of political structures, the impact of individual agency and historiography.  A History of Ancient Greece will promote multiliteracy by teaching students the value of material as well as written evidence in understanding and interpreting the ancient world.  This course explores the importance of the Greek legacy to Western Civilisation more broadly. The course is specifically designed to meet the needs of history majors and secondary education students wishing to teach ancient history.

    HIST2016 A History of Crime: Assessing the Evidence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Some call it a ‘sinister allure’ while cultural criminologists refer to the ‘joy of transgression’ and the ‘delight in being deviant’. Crime fascinates and is now one of the most popular genres of history. This course studies the way that crime and criminality has contributed to modern Australian history. It pays particular attention to social relationships underpinning crime and develops understanding of key social justice issues related to the politics of crime. Students in this course assess specific crimes, criminals and criminal periods for what they reveal about society at the time. Students study a range of sources in this course to consider the history of crime, including private and government archives, prison and police records, photographs, literature, film, letters, diaries and oral histories. Upon completion of this course, students will have examined the representation of crime in modern culture and society, in Australia and abroad.

    HIST2021 The History and Politics of Southeast Asia
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course thoroughly examines contemporary issues in Southeast Asia and explores how the various countries in the region have sought to forge new national identities in the wake of European colonisation. There will be a strong emphasis on issues such as warfare, security, and terrorism, the impact of communism and Islam; and the influence of the region's history. Students will be asked to consider the future of Southeast Asia nations within the wider Asia-Pacific Region, and their relationship with Western countries such as Australia.

    HIST2022 The Modern Middle East
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The modern ‘Middle East’ is an extremely important region – both historically and in the contemporary context.  It is the birthplace of three important monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Many great powers have traversed and settled in these lands for reasons of trade, access to natural resources (particularly oil) and for religious reasons.  It is home to a diverse range of ethnic, religious, cultural and linguistic groups with rich histories and often competing interests.  Further complicating this is the pursuance of political, economic and other interests by Western powers, such as Britain, France and the USA as well as the former USSR during the cold war period. The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the major forces which have shaped the modern Middle East, how Middle Eastern states interact with each other and states beyond the region, and what this means for the region and the broader international community.

    HIST2024 The Tudors
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    On 22 August 1485, Henry Tudor ended the Wars of the Roses by defeating Richard III at the battle of Bosworth.  As Henry VII, he inherited an England which was, according to G.R. Elton, 'the product of war and plague'.  Yet we remember Tudor England as a period which transformed the nation.  By the time that the reign of Elizabeth I ended in 1603 England had been scorched by Reformation and Inquisition; shocked by treason at court, intrigue in parliament and scandal in the bedroom of Henry VIII; entertained by the creative genius of William Shakespeare; infused by the art and philosophy of the Renaissance; and made wealthy by the adventures of Sir Walter Raleigh and others in the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and the beginning of the British Empire.  This course will dazzle students with the intrigue, drama, torture, triumph, war and power of England under the Tudors.

    HIST2026 The European Middle Ages, c.450-c.1250
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The European Middle Ages offers an overview of this fascinating and fundamental period of Western Civilisation. This course develops key understandings of the foundational moments in Western, and particularly Christian, history by studying areas such as, the foundation of western law; Europe's Roman and Christian inheritance; the history and influence of the Church; Mediaeval, western intellectual trends; Christendom’s relationship with Byzantium and the Islamic world; the development of commerce, economics and international trade as well as art and cultural experiences.

    HIST2028 Visual Evidence: Art and Artefacts in the Western Tradition
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Visual Evidence: Art in the Western Tradition presents critical approaches to significant themes in the history of Western Art from the Ancient World to the 20th century. The course develops key understandings of the foundational moments in Western, and particularly Christian, history by engaging with and deconstructing extant visual texts. Specifically, the course will promote multiliteracy by teaching students how to 'read' and critically assess the visual texts as a valid document of the attitudes, ideals and concerns of past societies by exploring themes such as spirituality and devotion, iconoclasm, humanism, civic pride, imperialism, absolutism, colonialism, revolution, technological advancement, World War I and II. Visual texts are a traditionally overlooked area of historical research; this course underlines the importance of visual texts in history by helping the students to develop a vocabulary, or metalanguage, to talk about them and to extract meaning from them.

    HIST2029 Nazi Germany: Assessing the Evidence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The historiography of Nazi Germany is vast.  Since 1945, historians have grappled with evidence to interpret the Nazi regime and to assess the role of its leaders, the culpability of German society, and the causes, impacts and legacies of the Third Reich. This course explores the forms of evidence by which we might understand Nazi Germany, including diaries and letters, newspapers, film, oral histories, trial evidence, photography and architecture.  It examines those key disputes amongst historians and scholars about what happened, and why.  Most importantly, this course provides scholarly and professional learning activities that can be used to enhance student graduate employability, and to provide a pathway for ongoing learning and research in History.

    HIST3008 History Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    History internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    HIST3016 A History of Crime: Assessing the Evidence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    Some call it a ‘sinister allure’ while cultural criminologists refer to the ‘joy of transgression’ and the ‘delight in being deviant’. Crime fascinates and is now one of the most popular genres of history. This course studies the way that crime and criminality has contributed to modern Australian history. It pays particular attention to social relationships underpinning crime and develops understanding of key social justice issues related to the politics of crime. Students in this course assess specific crimes, criminals and criminal periods for what they reveal about society at the time. Students study a range of sources in this course to consider the history of crime, including private and government archives, prison and police records, photographs, literature, film, letters, diaries and oral histories. Upon completion of this course, students will have examined the representation of crime in modern culture and society, in Australia and abroad.

    HIST3028 Visual Evidence: Art and Artefacts in the Western Tradition
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    Visual Evidence: Art in the Western Tradition presents critical approaches to significant themes in the history of Western Art from the Ancient World to the 20th century.   The course develops key understandings of the foundational moments in Western, and particularly Christian, history by engaging with and deconstructing extant visual texts.  Specifically, the course will promote multiliteracy by teaching students how to 'read' and critically assess the visual texts as a valid document of the attitudes, ideals and concerns of past societies by exploring themes such as spirituality and devotion, iconoclasm, humanism, civic pride, imperialism, absolutism, colonialism, revolution, technological advancement, World War I and II. Visual texts are a traditionally overlooked area of historical research; this course underlines the importance of visual texts in history by helping the students to develop a vocabulary, or metalanguage, to talk about them and to extract meaning from them.

    HIST3029 Nazi Germany: Assessing the Evidence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    The historiography of Nazi Germany is vast.  Since 1945, historians have grappled with evidence to interpret the Nazi regime and to assess the role of its leaders, the culpability of German society, and the causes, impacts and legacies of the Third Reich. This course explores the forms of evidence by which we might understand Nazi Germany, including diaries and letters, newspapers, film, oral histories, trial evidence, photography and architecture.  It examines those key disputes amongst historians and scholars about what happened, and why.  Most importantly, this course provides scholarly and professional learning activities that can be used to enhance student graduate employability, and to provide a pathway for ongoing learning and research in History.

  • Mathematics

    MATH1030 Principles of Mathematics
    Principles of Mathematics covers the important basic concepts in algebra and trigonometry that a tertiary student is expected to master to undertake advanced mathematical concepts at upper level mathematics courses at the University of Notre Dame. 
    The course is designed to further the knowledge of students in the fields of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithm and trigonometric functions. The student is also expected to understand and apply trigonometric identities and functions to solve practical mathematical problems. The course also covers analytical geometry and topics in matrices, sequences and systems of linear equations.
    Overall the course provides a strong grounding in algebra and trigonometry at a tertiary level for further advanced mathematical studies. This course is an essential part of the mathematics program and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training for Education students.

    MATH1300 Mathematics Foundation
    This course covers mathematical topics at a pre-calculus level, commencing with an introduction to arithmetic and algebraic rules. Students explore the theoretical components and practical applications of linear equations and inequalities. The study of functions continues with an examination of quadratic, rational and radical functions in theoretical and practical situations and encompasses the use of graphical and algebraic techniques when solving for equations and inequalities.

    MATH1400 Key Concepts in Mathematics
    This course covers topics including the basic principles of algebra, trigonometry, geometry and mensuration. Beginning with a review of the real number system and basic algebra, students explore polynomial functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic) and non-polynomial functions (rational, radical) with regard to their equations, corresponding graphs, and application to real-life situations. Trigonometric identities, rules and functions are also investigated with attention being paid to the course circle, the Cartesian plane, and practical situations. Finally, key characteristics of relations such as circles and ellipses are examined.

    MATH2000 Linear Algebra
    Pre-requisite: MATH1030 Principles of Mathematics
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the area of linear algebra. The course introduces vectors and vector spaces covering addition of vectors, scalar multiplication and the geometric meaning of vectors. The theory of matrices is also developed and includes matrix addition and multiplication, inverse matrices, determinants and the use of Gaussian elimination to solve systems of equations. Matrix theory is also applied to the study of linear transformations.

    MATH2100 Calculus and Applied Mathematics
    Pre-requisite: MATH1030 Principles of Mathematics, MATH2000 Linear Algebra
    This course provides students with a foundation in the theory and applications of differential and integral calculus. The course begins with problem-solving techniques involving relations and functions such as linear, quadratic, cubic, reciprocal, exponential, logarithmic, square root, and trigonometric. Specialised topics of limits, continuity, and graph sketching are explored within the study of relations and functions. The topics of differential and integral calculus are examined at theoretical and applicable levels. After learning the key principles of integration and differentiation, students apply this knowledge in solving both conceptual and real-world problems.

    MATH3030 Discrete Mathematics
    Pre-requisite: MATH2000 Linear Algebra
    This course introduces students to areas of discrete mathematics. The course covers relations, including equivalence relations and partial orderings; algorithms; areas of number theory, including induction and recursion; proofs; and graph theory, including an introduction to trees and their applications.

    MATH3040 Advanced Calculus
    Pre-requisite: MATH2100 Calculus and Applied Mathematics
    This course extends students’ knowledge of Calculus. The course covers differential equations, series, multivariable functions, integration, partial differential equations and applications of these theories including modelling physical problems.

  • Philosophy

    CORE1010 Introduction to Philosophy
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    CORE1020 Ethics
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    PHIL2100 History of Philosophy: Ancient
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    PHIL2110 History of Philosophy: Medieval
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    PHIL2130 History of Philosophy: Modern
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    PHIL2140 History of Philosophy: Contemporary
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    PHIL3050 Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art
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    PHIL3080 Natural Law
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    PHIL3090 Moral Philosophy
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    PHIL3150 Philosophy of Love and Friendship
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    PHIL3210 Philosophy of the Human Person
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    PHIL3300 Epistemology: Ways of Knowing
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    PHIL3310 Cosmology and Philosophy of Science
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    PHIL3410 Political Philosophy
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    PHIL3510 Metaphysics: Theories of Being and Existence
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    PHIL3520 Philosophy of Religion
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    PHIL3550 Myth and Meaning
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    PHIL3710 Logical and Critical Thinking
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    PHIL3950 Special Topics in Philosophy and Ethics
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  • Politics

    POLI1000 Introduction to World Politics
    This course looks at international issues and ideologies, and how they shape our increasingly 'globalised' political world. As such, the course seeks to unravel contemporary international relations, examining the importance of the USA as a global superpower in a 'uni-polar' world, European integration, the United Nations and the plight of the 'Third World'. Using an issue based approach students look at the impact of war, HIV/AIDS, ethnic conflict, environmental crisis and regional economic competition on world politics. What ideas are used to explain these processes? And what does it all mean for the political future of our planet?

    POLI1001 Politics, Democracy and Governance in Australia
    The aim of this course is to give students an understanding of Australian politics at both an institutional and social level. By discussing contemporary issues, the course leads into an examination of the key concepts, institutions and ideologies which have shaped the Australian political system. Important contemporary debates, like those over Aboriginal land rights, the republic, immigration restrictions and labour relations are used to test political theories on the nature and practice of government and society in Australia. Throughout the course, students are expected to utilise a range of media resources including the press, radio and current affairs programmes.

    POLI3002 Political Philosophy
    (Course run by School of Philosophy. Prerequisite: Completion of 1st year)  
    This course examines the influence of philosophers and their philosophies on current day social organization. Prominent themes include democracy and other political systems, power, private property, freedom, equality, human nature, civil disobedience, liberalism, feminism, social control, and the relationship between politics and religion.

    POLI3003 Setting the Agenda: The Media and Politics
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course investigates the role the media plays within the political process in Australia and compares this to experiences abroad. Students examine: the way that news is made; the political interests that are represented by different media groups and the essentials of developing media strategies.

    POLI3006 Public Policy and Practice: The Business of Government
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course is designed to familiarise students with the theories, models and processes of public and social policy making. It is intended to provide an understanding of the role of the public sector, its management and the ways in which policy is devised, implemented and evaluated. The course also examines some key policy areas.

    POLI3007 Home and Away: Comparing Political Systems
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    An understanding of Australian politics is enriched by comparing and contrasting it with politics and political systems in other countries. This course examines a selection of similar politics, such as those in the US, the UK and Canada, along with a selection of very different systems in Asia and Africa. The focus is on constitutional politics, divergences in political culture, models of political economy and ideas about political representation.

    POLI3008 Politics Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of POLI prior learning
    Politics internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    POLI3009 Australian Foreign Policy
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course looks at the changing nature of Australian foreign policy. Originally established as an outpost of the British Empire, Australian foreign policy has altered dramatically over the last two centuries as the nation has constantly redefined its 'national interests'. Australia's diplomatic relations with Britain, Europe, the United States and Asia are examined in some detail. This course also examines controversial aspects of past and present Australian Foreign policy; including the Cold War, the White Australia Policy, military alliances and conflict, East Timor, the United Nations, etc. Fundamentally the course examines how Australia perceives itself, and what this means for our relations with the rest of the world.

    POLI3012 The Politics and History of Genocide
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Apologists for western civilisation, such as Francis Fukuyama and Marvin Perry, suggest that the modern West is perhaps the pinnacle of human achievement in human culture and political liberty.  Edwin Locke goes so far as to suggest that the ‘greatness of the West is not an “ethnocentric” prejudice; it is an objective fact’.  Yet in the last hundred years alone, western societies have repeatedly engaged in war, ideological extremism and genocide.  The deliberate physical and cultural destruction to which millions of peoples in the West and in the developing world have been subjected suggests that the triumph of the twentieth century is a hollow one indeed. This course will provide students with an opportunity to examine the sensitive issue of genocide in the modern world.  It will make use of case studies to highlight political, historical and sociological perspectives on genocide, including the relationship between social, cultural and institutional power that contribute to the conditions and acts of genocide; the emergence in history of ‘genocide’ as an internationally recognised crime; and the political diversity and continuity between contexts where genocide has occurred. Finally, this critical and comparative approach will consider principles and policy options which may prevent the horror of genocide occurring in the future.

    POLI3014 Terrorism and Intelligence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The tragedy of 9-11 has raised fundamental questions about how nations collect and analyse intelligence, and about how to ensure that past security blunders and missed opportunities are not repeated. 
    In Australia, the first order response to fight the war on terror has been to make new laws and to extend the powers and resources of the intelligence community. This course will critically examine the nature and causes of terrorism. It will assess, too, the manner in which the security sector serves a continually changing agenda, given post-9/11 needs and concerns. Students will analyse how the war on terrorism impacts collection of intelligence data, analysis, and counterintelligence, as well as legal and moral standards of security policies and practices.

    POLI3017 Screening History: The Politics of Moving Pictures
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines the significance of the medium of film as a political and historical device. Issues examined in this course include the impact of film upon popular perceptions of the past, the interaction between "art" and "propaganda" in the construction of modern cinema, and the role of filmmakers as teachers and interpreters of history. The social history of the film industry as a site for political struggle is also analysed.

    POLI3021 The History and Politics of Southeast Asia
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course thoroughly examines contemporary issues in Southeast Asia and explores how the various countries in the region have sought to forge new national identities in the wake of European colonisation. There will be a strong emphasis on issues such as warfare, security, and terrorism; the impact of communism and Islam; and the influence of the region's history. Students will be asked to consider the future of Southeast Asia nations within the wider Asia-Pacific region, and their relationship with Western countries such as Australia.

    POLI3022 The Modern Middle East
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the turbulent history and volatile politics of the Middle Eastern region, including Iran, Turkey, Afghanistan, and Israel. The course traces the origins of the tension between Middle-Eastern culture and Western culture back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of World War 1, and extends to the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. In particular, the course will examine the rise of a new Pan-Islamic identity in the Middle East during the Twentieth Century, and the corresponding, though not necessarily complementary, rise of the nation state. There will be discussion on the creation of the Jewish state of Israel and the subsequent struggles which have occurred as a result, including the current Israel-Palestine question.

    POLI3023 Strategy, Security and Diplomacy
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Diplomacy is used by states as an alternative means of influencing the actions of other states, and is an alternative to armed conflict.  This course is designed to introduce students to new directions in the study of diplomacy, security and intelligence, to help develop a fundamental knowledge of strategic studies and examine the major issues that shape the field such as the evolution of modern warfare. Since the late 1980s, there has been a remarkable change in the way security is conceived, studied and practiced. The field of strategy and diplomacy has been the subject of intense academic and political debate during this period.  The main aim of this course is to introduce students to main debates in security studies by tracing elements from its Cold War past to the post-9-11 era and opening up alternative ways of thinking about future trends and transformations.

    POLI3024 USA Foreign Policy since 1945
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course briefly looks at major developments in the foreign policy of the United States since 1945. Following the emergence of the USA as a global superpower in the aftermath of World War Two, this course examines the United States’ engagement with the rest of the world. In particular, and in the context of the Cold War, the United States’ decades-long global struggle against Communism is examined in considerable detail. We will also look at the ‘New World Order’ proclaimed by President Bush in 1991 during the Gulf War. 9/11 and US Foreign policy in relation to the ‘War on Terror’ are also analysed.

  • Science

    BIOL1250 Molecular and Cell Biology
    This course provides a fundamental understanding of cell and molecular biology as it underpins life and organism function. Students are guided to build their conceptual understanding of increasingly complex levels of biological organisation. Topics include the application of biological chemistry; cell structure, function, energetics and ‘life’ cycle; an introduction to tissues; function of biologically important molecules; the role of genes in inheritance; and the body’s defence against invading pathogens. Through interactive tutorials, practical sessions and tasks, students build fundamental laboratory and communication skills, explore the lecture themes through ‘real-world’ examples and pursue their interests in biological and/or health science.

    BIOL2100 Animal Diversity
    Pre-requisite: SCIE1150 Introduction to Biological Sciences
    This course provides students with an understanding of the evolutionary relationships and environmental adaptations of animals. Through an exploration of morphology, behaviour and ecology the diversity of the animal kingdom is revealed. The first half of the course uses a systematic approach to biological classification and phylogenetic relationships of the major animal phyla with a particular focus on the invertebrates. The course then shifts its attention to animal behaviour, community ecology and the fundamental concepts of population genetics. Special attention is paid to the geographical distribution of animals in the Australian environment.

    BIOL2260 Plant Diversity
    Pre-requisite: SCIE1150 Introduction to Biological Sciences
    This course explains the patterns of diversity amongst plants and their associated organisms through comparisons of morphology, lifecycles and ecological characteristics. Students commence with a systematic assessment of the main phyla of fungi, algae, and lower plants, before exploring a series of topics that focus on the relationship between plants, people and the Australian environment. The course offers a varied program that integrates laboratory, fieldwork, and industry experience that equips students with professionally relevant practical scientific and botanical skills.

    BIOL3000 Adaptations for Survival in the Australian Environment
    Pre-requisite: BIOL1150 Introduction to Biological Science
    In this course students investigate how organisms in different environments meet their basic needs and cope with stress. Students examine the relationship between the form and function of plants and animals as a response to challenges associated with surviving in their natural environment. Universally applicable themes such as nutrition, water balance and temperature regulation are explored in the lectures, with a focus on Australian examples. Hands-on learning opportunities via laboratory and project work reinforce conceptual understanding and skills development. Students consolidate their foundational knowledge in biological science and extend their understanding and skills in the areas of evolutionary biology, physiology, ecology and scientific experimentation.

    BIOL3250 Aquatic Science
    Pre-requisite: SCIE1150 Introduction to Biological Sciences
    This course examines natural processes occurring in inland wetlands and estuarine environments.  Aspects of biodiversity, ecosystem function, and physical and chemical features of aquatic systems are considered in detail using examples drawn from wetlands of southwestern Australia. The impacts of human activities on the natural functioning of aquatic systems are also considered in the context of management issues and approaches.  The practical and field component of the course explores physical, chemical and biological research techniques in limnology.

    ENVR2330 Australian Ecology: from theory to practice
    Pre-requisite: Nil
    Ecology allows us to understand patterns of species distribution and abundance and, when applied, can help identify and address the impact of pressures that threaten biodiversity. This course uses the context of the Australian environment to provide a foundation in ecology and its application. Population demographics, community dynamics and ecosystem processes are examined and this theory is paired with hands-on field and class experiences so students can develop data handling and analytical skills. Through this combination of theory and practical experiences, students learn that human wellbeing is inescapably tied to ‘nature’ and why the science of ecology is essential for the restoration and sustainable management of natural environments.

    ENVR3200 Understanding Sustainable Development Practices
    Pre-requisite: Completed 200 units of credit of prior learning
    This course provides a valuable opportunity to apply and build knowledge of and skills in international and local sustainable development. Students explore principle sustainable development practices, through the development of a structured local case study aligned with government agencies, industry and community. The main topic areas of this course are Operationalizing Sustainability, System’s Thinking in Community Development, Promoting Stakeholder Interest & Involvement, Sustainability Leadership and Governance, Community Change and Evaluating Community Improvement. Students consider the significance of “Economy” in a Sustainable World by the development of a Strategic Sustainability Plan. The course aims to build the capacities needed for a career as a sustainability practitioner.

    ENVR3310 Environmental Impact Assessment and Planning
    Pre-requisite: Completed 200 units of credit of prior learning
    Environmental impact assessment is an environmental management and development planning tool applied worldwide. This course examines the evolution of environmental impact assessment and critically evaluates the operation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) procedures, specifically, the environmental, social and economic influences of environmental management decision-making in Australia and other countries. The practical application and efficacy of environmental impact assessment is explored with reference to local project-by-project developments in Western Australia.

    ENVR3520 Natural Resources Management
    Pre-requisite: Completed 200 units of credit of prior learning
    This course introduces a conceptual framework for analysing and engaging with current issues and debates about the management of natural resources. This is achieved by analysing the history of natural resource management and how policy has shaped the sector in a local and global context. Contemporary debates around issues such as economic value, governance, stakeholder participation and control of and access to resources are discussed, drawing on different analytical frameworks. Specific problems are drawn from different industry sectors – including agriculture, tourism and conservation, forestry, water, mining and fisheries – using both Australian and international case studies. In this course, students will be exposed to natural resource policy and management through the context of an individual case study critique in which the ecological sustainable development paradigm is evaluated.

    GEOG1110 Physical Geography: Climates, Geology and Soils
    This course provides an introductory exploration of Physical Geography.  Topics covered include: the four spheres of Physical Geography and their interaction, namely the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, the lithosphere and the biosphere; how the global atmospheric and climatic variations relate to the formation of earth surface; the hydrological cycle and water distribution in the form of surface and ground water; and an introduction into the physical and structural geological composition of Earth. An investigation is made of the landforms of Australia and Western Australia in relation to their physiographic processes and evolutionary history. In addition, students will develop analytical skills through practical and field-based learning.

    GEOG1210 Human Geography: Place, Environment and Society
    This course explores the interface between human populations and the physical environment. Significant challenges facing modern society such as human demographics, urban dynamics, contested space, inequitable global development and the extent to which conflict can influence and be influenced by geography are investigated. A global perspective and a multidisciplinary approach are applied to investigate the fusion of social, cultural, political and economic factors which shape the world. This area of study prepares students wanting to pursue careers in regional development and planning, environmental impact assessment, sustainability, natural resource management, teaching geography, society and environmental studies.

    GEOG3110 Coastal Processes and Planning
    Pre-requisite: GEOG1110 Physical Geography: Climates, Geology and Soils
    This course provides a comprehensive study of the coastal environment with particular reference to Western Australia. An understanding of the dynamic processes operating within underlying environments is used as a basis to examine coastal geomorphology. A series of field trips and exercises complement the theoretical component to this course. Through a case study approach, students critically evaluate the planning and management of coastlines through the identification of key mechanisms that influence coastal areas. This course prepares students wanting to pursue careers in environmental impact assessment, sustainability, natural resource management, outdoor recreation education, eco-tourism and environmental studies.

    SCIE1000 Introduction to Chemistry
    This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include the properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, solutions, thermodynamics, acids and bases, equilibrium and organic chemistry. Drawing on examples from nature, the relationship between bond type, structure and intermolecular forces are explored to highlight differences between the properties of natural and man-made materials. Laboratory experiments are used to reinforce theoretical knowledge and develop skills in the application of scientific methods.

    SCIE1001 Fundamentals of Science Research and Communication
    This course equips students with essential skills and tools to successfully transition into studying Science at university and become a confident, independent learner. The course covers scientific enquiry, critical thinking, academic research, basic data analysis, and science communication. Using current environmental issues, students develop their communication skills, both written and oral, and learn the importance of academic integrity including referencing. Experimental data is analysed, interpreted and communicated using mediums for academic communication. A collaborative research project fosters teamwork and strengthen the sense of community.

    SCIE1150 Introduction to Biological Sciences
    This introductory course provides students with a sound foundation in biological science by incorporating human, animal and plant perspectives at a range of scales from the sub-cellular to the ecosystem level. Topics covered include; cell structure, biological chemistry, cell division, inheritance, nutrition, water balance, respiration, reproduction and introductory ecology. Complementing the broad range of topics are practical experiences that establishes basic skills in microscopy, the interpretation of biological material and experimental design.

    SCIE2100 Animal Diversity
    Pre-requisite: SCIE1150 Introduction to Biological Sciences
    This course provides students with an understanding of the evolutionary relationships and environmental adaptations of animals. Through an exploration of morphology, behaviour and ecology the diversity of the animal kingdom is revealed. The first half of the course uses a systematic approach to biological classification and phylogenetic relationships of the major animal phyla with a particular focus on the invertebrates. The course then shifts its attention to animal behaviour, community ecology and the fundamental concepts of population genetics. Special attention is paid to the geographical distribution of animals in the Australian environment.

    SCIE2270 Data Analysis and Experimental Design
    This course provides an introduction to the iterative nature of scientific investigation. Students will gain a greater understanding of experimental design, data analysis and interpretation of results in research. Basic statistical analyses will be covered; hypothesis development, central tendency, probability, analysis of variance, correlation, regression significance testing and non-parametric statistics. Students will become familiar with the statistical package SPSS.

    SCIE3290 Geographic Information Systems
    This course examines the structure, function and use of geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool for managing, presenting, and analysing geographical data. With a significant practical component this course allows students the opportunity to generate and manipulate digital spatial information, as well as undertake digital terrain modelling. The ability to use GIS software is a widely sought after skill in planning, management and research. Geographic Information Systems specifically uses the context of environmental planning and management to introduce students to this technology.

    SCIE3350 Directed Science Research
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 400 units of credit of prior learning
    Directed Science Research develops skills in research, communication, self-management and project management. Centred on an individual research project that is created and directed by the student, the course builds student confidence and skills in information literacy, research design, project management, evidence-based writing and verbal communication. Through this course, students investigate a particular topic in depth, including those of special interest or not covered by other courses, to construct new understandings.

    SCIE3900 Science Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 400 units of credit of prior learning
    The Internship aims to provide a professional and practical experience for students of the university during their final year of undergraduate studies in Science.  It provides a link between industry and the professional training of university graduates.  Students would normally be entering their third year of their Bachelor of Science program when they enrol for the Science Internship, and this must be approved prior to commencement by the Internship Coordinator.  A minimum of 225 hrs work experience (6 weeks equivalent) is to be completed during the student's third year of studies.  The Internship is assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

  • Social Justice

    SOJS1000 Introduction to Social Justice
    In the context of widespread global poverty, criticisms of local and global inequalities and questions over the consequences of environmental and social degradation, social justice is a concept gaining increasing international recognition. Centred on principles of equality, solidarity and human dignity, social justice aims to link social theory with social action and change. However, while social justice as an idea is gaining momentum, what it actually means and how it can be applied is often left largely unexplored and undefined. In this course, students will be introduced to the study of social justice. Engaging with diverse meanings and definitions, students will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of key concepts and theories of social justice. Presented in relation to some of the most important social justice debates today, the course will equip students to apply these concepts and theories to a range of subject areas and social issues.

    SOJS1120 Living Human Rights
    This course introduces students to the concept of universal human rights. . Students will learn about the contested nature of human rights, exploring different perspectives and examining the historical context that has shaped human rights policies and instruments today. Students will be introduced to key areas of human rights, exploring these through examples and case studies, in order to understand how they relate to their everyday lives.

    SOJS2120 Living Human Rights
    This course introduces students to the concept of universal human rights. Students will learn about the contested nature of human rights, exploring different perspectives and examining the historical context that has shaped human rights policies and instruments today. Students will be introduced to key areas of human rights, exploring these through examples and case studies, in order to understand how they relate to their everyday lives.

    SOJS3008 Social Justice Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of SOJS courses
    Social Justice Internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students will, ideally, be exposed to a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice and the ethical delivery of self. Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship. This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    SOJS3130 Human and Environmental Security
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The central questions of the course are: What is critical? What is security? Traditionally, the field of International Relations concerned itself with state security, and has studied it through realist and occasionally liberal, Marxist, and constructivist lenses. This course goes beyond this mainstream in two ways. First, we question whether the state is the appropriate (or only) referent object for security, and second, we use analytical models from outside the mainstream. The first part of the course reviews critical approaches to the study of international security, and the second part examines a range of issues including environmental security, public safety, cyber security, and counter-terrorism which might be considered non-traditional

    SOJS3160 Peace and Conflict Studies
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course equips students with theoretical and conceptual tools to help them understand the causes of, and solutions for, violent conflict. Theories and concepts of peace and violence are explored, and applied to broad and context-specific case studies. Multidisciplinary in nature, Peace and Conflict Studies draws on History, Politics and International Relations, Sociology, Psychology and Gender Studies to analyse the causes of violent conflict.  This course is founded on a moral imperative to pursue non-violence and a just peace. Students are encouraged to consider strategies for effective peacebuilding at a variety of levels, from the interpersonal to the geopolitical.

    SOJS3170 Social Justice, Service-Learning and Community Engagement 
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course utilises service learning to develop better communities and to enable students to understand social justice issues. Through completion of a community placement, students develop critical skills such as leadership through service, ethical decision-making, and self-reflection. The experiences in the placement are viewed through a social justice lens, including Catholic Social teaching, active citizenship, and community participation. During this course students discuss issues in their local community and what their role is in them.

    SOJS3190 Social Implications of Globalisation
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Globalisation has become a seemingly unstoppable force over recent decades and, in its wake, campaigns for improved social justice have developed around the world in response to its negative and fragmenting aspects. This course will explore the economic, political and cultural factors which give rise to the social problems of globalisation, and will examine the many attempts to solve or address them. There are many reasons why social problems occur. In addressing the social dilemmas inherent in the pursuit of justice, this course will examine the operation of social policy in the contemporary welfare state and the key social problems in Australia in areas such as law and order, alienation, climate change, health, education, income security, housing, citizenship and immigration.

    SOJS3210 Designing Practical Approaches to Social Justice Issues
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    In this course students will work collaboratively to address a social problem in our community. Emphasis will be on a problem in our local social, cultural or political environment. Students will be expected to apply social justice principles to formulate a response, such as equality, justice, sustainability, and social inclusion. The course will see students consult expertise inside and outside the university as part of their problem-solving work.

    SOJS3220 Service Learning International
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course applies the concept of service learning to an overseas, international context. Emphasis will be placed on social justice along with cross-cultural understanding and awareness. The academic learning in the course focuses on key issues such as human rights, globalisation, and community development. The experiential component explores ethical decision-making, leadership development, and balancing the needs of the individual, the community and the natural environment.

  • Sociology

    SOCI2020 Sociology of Childhood
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Through lectures, course readings and discussions, we will cover the social world that our society provides for children, and the social world that children create for themselves. We will consider how the meaning of childhood changes over time, place, and social context. We will see that there is no singular definition of childhood, but instead many different ways of experiencing youth and adolescence in Western societies and in the Global South. Children are socialized in a variety of social institutions (e.g., schools, family, work); the course should help us understand the effects these institutions have on children's lives and futures. Sexism, racism, classism, and abuse also affect children, and this course will explore these and other negative childhood experiences. Children are not just receptors for socialization; the course will also address how their lives and experiences shape society now and for the future. Typically children are only studied as victims or perpetrators of social problems, but in this course we will consider children in many additional contexts. We will also pay special attention to why the relationship between youth and popular culture is routinely viewed as problematic, how children are discussed within the popular press, and examine how public policy (Children Rights included) and laws are formulated in response to this and other issues. This course may be especially beneficial to current or future policy makers, teachers and counsellors working with children, historians, family lawyers and advocates and parents alike.

    SOCI2030 Health, Medicine and Society
    This course introduces students to a sociological approach to the health and illness patterns in Australia.  It will introduce historical, social and cultural dimensions of health care delivery,  health and illness, including  patterns of social inequality which effect vulnerable groups in society.  Students develop an understanding of and sensibility to the many factors that can impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities in Australian society today.

    SOCI3000 Ableism, (Dis)ability and Society
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines the social construction of ‘ableism’ and its significance in shaping experiences of disability within society by identifying the social and psychological processes that facilitate its development. Contemporary social theories understand ableism as the product of social and cultural processes of normalization and privilege to be challenged (rather than focusing on disability as an individual pathology to be treated). Students investigate how these perspectives have influenced developments in advocacy and empowerment; media and technology; education; policy and community development; human rights law; and service delivery for people with disabilities. Understanding the power differentials that are created by the construction of categories of human functioning and the discourses that underpin these provide students with the mechanisms to challenge and resist such construction in their professional practice.

    SOCI3008 Sociology Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of SOCI prior learning
    Sociology internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

  • Theatre Studies

    THTR1000 Theory and Practice of Acting 1
    The course is an introduction to acting skills, with a practical emphasis on movement skills and vocal technique. Through improvisation and scripted work, students learn how to communicate non-verbally with an audience and effectively employ the mechanics of voice. Students also practically discover and examine the work and theories of seminal practitioners such as Stanislavski and Brecht. This course includes instruction, discussion and practical exercises.

    THTR1050 Theory and Practice of Modern Theatre 
    This course examines popular dramatic forms from the mid nineteenth century to the more contemporary plays of the early twentieth century. It examines realism and naturalism and the audience reaction to it and how social change and pressure lead on to Expressionism, Surrealism, Absurdism and Epic Theatre. There is a focus on critical analysis of texts as well as opportunities to further enhance understanding through performance. Teaching mode includes lectures, tutorials and performance workshops.

    THTR2000 Theory and Practice of Acting II
    Pre-requisite: THTR1000 Theory and Practice of Acting I
    This course extends the students understanding of contemporary performance theory and practice. There is continual emphasis on voice and movement as well as textual interpretation and improvisation. Students will research and explore various post-Stanislavsky approaches to acting and performance. A variety of texts will be introduced for individual and ensemble performance.

    THTR2010 Theatre Crafts
    Pre-requisite: THTR1000 Theory and Practice of Acting I OR THTR1050 Theory and Practice of Modern Theatre
    This course offers students an opportunity to learn about the creative processes involved in staging a theatrical production. The course provides an overview of design processes, stagecraft techniques and production duties. Students will have the opportunity to focus on one or more design elements such as script analysis, set design, sound and lighting, stage management, costumes and properties, marketing and publicity.

    THTR3008 Theatre Studies Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of THTR courses
    Theatre Studies internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    THTR3060 Australian Theatre
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines some of the greatest examples of Australian theatre from the mid‐nineteenth century to the present day. Students explore the dramatic styles employed by Australian playwrights and the power of theatre in Australian literary and popular culture, and may also consider how they compare to the creative works of Australian cinema and television.  Students also examine how Australian plays express a variety of important themes, in what fashion they might be an expression of history and culture, and how they reflect our society.

    THTR3090 Fundamentals of Directing 
    Pre-requisite: Nil
    This course examines the art of directing for the stage through theoretical discussion, text analysis, research and scene work. Students engage in a practical exploration of theatrical composition focusing on how one constructs meaning in theatre. The work of seminal theatre directors and contemporary methodologies are examined. Students adopt a collaborative approach to develop scenes from inspirations such as poetry, art and music, and stage scenes from both realistic and non-realistic theatre traditions. A showcase of student work may be presented at the end of the semester.

    THTR3110 Text-Based Production Workshop
    Pre-requisite: Nil
    Through this course students will explore the way meaning is communicated in the theatre in order to understand how play scripts can only be fully appreciated through performance.  Students will be involved in staging a fully rehearsed theatre production for public performance.  Each student will be assigned an on-stage role, and/or will be required to work on one or more specific aspects of staging the production. These production duties may include dramaturgy, stage management, lighting and sound design, props, costumes, marketing and publicity.

    THTR3120 Devised Production Workshop
    Pre-requisite: Nil
    This course will examine in a practical way the various processes involved in "devising" for contemporary theatre performance. Students will study the different approaches to devised theatre by examining contemporary performance practice and the work of seminal theatre makers. In devising their own ensemble presentation, students will research, discuss, plan, construct and workshop the piece as a group. Roles can be defined such as director, deviser and/or performer. Group work is essential to recognise the collaborative nature of the theatre experience.

    THTR3410 Drama in the Age of Shakespeare
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course involves a close study of a significant number of Shakespeare’s histories, tragedies and comedies. These plays are considered in the context of the variety of Elizabethan and Jacobean stages for which they were written, and on which they were performed. The plays of Shakespeare are studied in the context of the comedies and tragedies of some of his contemporaries.

  • Theology

    CORE1030 Introduction to Theology

    And any Theology course from the School of Philosophy and Theology, at least two of which must be 3000-level and no more than three at 1000 level for Compulsory courses within the Major.
    And any Theology course from the School of Philosophy and Theology, at least two of which must be 3000-level and no more than two at 1000 level for Compulsory courses within the Minor.

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  • Writing

    WRIT3000 Writing for Performance
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course introduces theory and practice of writing for live performance, particularly the stage. Students are exposed to a broad range of performance writing practices, and dramaturgy techniques and theories of performance. They will also engage in practical exercises to develop techniques for generating and structuring their own material. Various forms of writing will be studied including narrative-driven plot, dream writing, verbatim, poetic metaphor, and adaptation. The course will analyse the relationship between the playwright and his/her cultural context. Students will be encouraged to develop a sense of theatre as a tool for social critique and activism.