Course descriptions

  • Aboriginal Studies

    ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    This course is the foundation course in Aboriginal Studies.  It aims at promoting, from an historical perspective, an understanding of the Aboriginal people of modern Australia.  It focuses on a broad range of ideas including Aboriginal and European contact and the ensuing disruption of traditional culture, interracial conflict and government legislation.  The course provides an introduction to a number of current issues affecting Aboriginal people including health, education, law, business, cross-cultural relationships, land rights and Aboriginal self-determination.

    ABOR2000 The Cultural and Spiritual Life of Aboriginal People 
    Pre-requisite ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    The first part of the course looks at Aboriginal society and culture in its more traditional forms and what social organisation is understood to be like prior to the European invasion of Australia. The following topics will be studied: the social organisation and structure of traditional Aboriginal society (e.g. basic social groups, kinship and marriage customs); the relationship with the land; the lifestyle and various initiations associated with it; religious belief and practices, for example, The Dreaming, how Aboriginal people are connected to country, rituals and healing. In the second part of the course, students will develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of culture and appreciate that Aboriginal culture is not static. Contemporary issues studied such as the recognition of customary law, land rights and Aboriginal heritage protection show students the cultural continuities that sustain Aboriginal world views.

    ABOR2720 History of Aboriginal Education 
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal  People
    This course offers education students an opportunity to develop an appreciation of historical events, which is an essential element in their understanding of contemporary issues relating to the education of Indigenous Australians and, as educators, their active involvement in the reconciliation process. The course is also designed to extend and round out other Aboriginal Studies courses offered by the School of Arts and Sciences as part of the Aboriginal Studies program, providing students with a more in-depth understanding of social, cultural and political historical and contemporary relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.

    ABOR3030 Aboriginal People in Contemporary Australian Society 
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal People
    This course has been developed for students whose future careers require an in-depth understanding of the complex, multi-layered field of contemporary inter-cultural relationships. In particular, it aims to develop in students an appreciation of this relationship within the socio-political context of conflicting values and beliefs, government policies and service delivery. To achieve this objective the course commences with an examination of the nature and diversity of Aboriginal knowledge and experience as an introduction to the fundamental issues underlying contemporary debate over land, native title and regional agreements. The basic interconnections between federalism, bureaucracy and service delivery are then analysed at the macro level, through an examination of our current political/funding structures, before utilising case studies as a means of developing an understanding of what is happening “on the ground”. The issues of relationships of power, community governance and the employment of non-Aboriginal expertise within the Aboriginal domain are dealt with in the context of local studies situated within WA. The final module then focuses on welfare dependency, symptom or cause, as the major issue currently under the socio-political spotlight.

    ABOR3040 Aboriginal People and the Media
    Pre-requisite: ABOR1000 Aboriginal People 
    This course has been developed within the context of Notre Dame's commitment to the process of reconciliation and the provision of opportunities to enhance personal growth through engagement in challenging intellectual undertaking. In attempting to meet these commitments Aboriginal People and the Media offers students an opportunity to study the problematic relationship that exists between the media and the Indigenous peoples of Australia using media analysis techniques of semiology and discourse analysis to ‘read’ media texts. The course explores the media as the public sphere, where information about social, cultural and political issues of national importance are presented and debated, and how Aboriginality is represented within the public sphere of Australian mainstream media. In the final module, the course examines the growing Aboriginal response to the power and influence of the media through active involvement in establishing Indigenous alternatives within and outside the mainstream public sphere – the Indigenous public sphere.

    ABOR5010 The Cultural and Spiritual Life of Aboriginal People
    The first part of the course looks at Aboriginal society and culture in its more traditional forms and what social organisation is understood to be like prior to the European invasion of Australia. The following topics will be studied: the social organisation and structure of traditional Aboriginal society (e.g. basic social groups, kinship and marriage customs); the relationship with the land; the lifestyle and various initiations associated with it; religious belief and practices, for example, The Dreaming, how Aboriginal people are connected to country, rituals and healing. In the second part of the course, students will develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of culture and appreciate that Aboriginal culture is not static. Contemporary issues studied such as the recognition of customary law, land rights and Aboriginal heritage protection show students the cultural continuities that sustain Aboriginal world views.

    ABOR5030 Aboriginal People in Contemporary Australian Society
    This course has been developed for students whose future careers require an in-depth understanding of the complex, multi-layered field of contemporary inter-cultural relationships. In particular it aims to develop in students an appreciation of this relationship within the socio-political context of conflicting values and beliefs, government policies and service delivery. To achieve this objective the course commences with an examination of the nature and diversity of Aboriginal knowledge and experience as an introduction to the fundamental issues underlying contemporary debate over land, native title and regional agreements. The basic interconnections between federalism, bureaucracy and service delivery are then analysed at the macro level, through an examination of our current political/funding structures, before utilising case studies as a means of developing an understanding of what is happening “on the ground”. The issues of relationships of power, community governance and the employment of non-Aboriginal expertise within the Aboriginal domain are dealt with in the context of local studies situated within WA. The final module then focuses on welfare dependency, symptom or cause, as the major issue currently under the socio-political spotlight.

    ABOR5040 Aboriginal People and the Media
    This course has been developed within the context of Notre Dame's commitment to the process of reconciliation and the provision of opportunities to enhance personal growth through engagement in challenging intellectual undertaking. In attempting to meet these commitments Aboriginal People and the Media offers students an opportunity to study the problematic relationship that exists between the media and the Indigenous peoples of Australia using media analysis techniques of semiology and discourse analysis to ‘read’ media texts. The course explores the media as the public sphere, where information about social, cultural and political issues of national importance are presented and debated, and how Aboriginality is represented within the public sphere of Australian mainstream media. In the final module, the course examines the growing Aboriginal response to the power and influence of the media through active involvement in establishing Indigenous alternatives within and outside the mainstream public sphere – the Indigenous public sphere.

  • Advertising

    COMM2010 Production: Creative Advertising
    This course explores the creative dimensions of advertising. Students will be taught methodologies to deliver creative content. They will develop advertising concepts and explore the production dimensions of advertising beyond the storyboard. Students will develop creative concepts for advertising campaigns, engage imaginatively with agency briefs, and work with advertising professionals to develop their skills. This course will be of interest to students seeking to enter either the strategic or creative side of the advertising and communications industry.

    COMM2030 Language of Film
    This course will introduce students to the lexicon of film and the diverse techniques through which films generate meaning. The course will encompass major movements in film history and theory: Silent to Sound, Auteur and Genre Theory, Transnational Cinemas, and the Digital Revolution in Cinema. It will challenge students to think analytically about the ways in which films construct meaning, including the uses of cinematography, editing, art direction, screenplay and sound. The course will denaturalise and deconstruct the proverbial magic of the silver screen, firmly locating film within its cultural and ideological discourses. This course is specifically designed to equip students with the analytical tools required for the Film and Screen Production major and is, therefore, a prerequisite for a number of upper level Communications and Media courses.

    COMM3300 Documentary Studies
    This course will examine the development of the documentary from its origins to the present day. Students will explore theoretical and practical issues related to screen documentary through readings, screenings and class discussions.  Case studies will range from cinema vérité and expository documentary through to mock documentary and emerging modes. Major documentary theorists and practitioners will be considered, as will underlying issues ranging from ethical considerations involved in representing reality and other cultures, to the place of documentary in a future of global and technological convergence. A recommended prerequisite for this course is COMM2030 Language of Film.

    COMM3430 Advertising Design: Professional Brief
    Pre-requisite: BUSN2050 Integrated Marketing Communications AND COMM2010 Production: Creative Advertising 
    This is the capstone course of the Advertising Major in which students work professionally and creatively with clients to consolidate and integrate the skills and learning that has been developed across all previous courses. Students will formulate an advertising campaign from a real-world client’s brief from proposal to production. Working as teams, students will research their client’s advertising problem, identify strategies to solve it, match creative solutions to innovative media plans, deliver a boardroom pitch to the client and produce the creative work.

    Working as part of a cross-functional and cross-faculty team, students will develop skills and experience in collaborative learning environments that simulate real-world business and creative environments. The project will require students to adopt a variety of industry-relevant roles including marketers, account managers, creative specialists and media planners. The end result of this course is a supervised, self-directed project for graduand’s portfolio.  This course allows graduands to stand out from other like job applicants in the advertising and related industry sectors.

    COMM3510 Advertising and Society
    Pre-requisite: COMM1210 Introduction to Screen Production AND COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course examines the communication process between media text and audience at an advanced level. The course examines major theoretical issues in communication studies, with an emphasis on the persuasive power of media. The course includes a detailed study of persuasion in advertising, as well as a broader look at the communication process at work in a range of media texts. The communication protocols of analysts, consumers, and fans is considered to bring issues of readership into the analytical equation.

    COMM6000 Advanced Screen Skills Directing
    This course focuses on directing for film and screen production, developing skills in the direction of actors, cinematography, production design, sound design, editing, and production management in order to create a technically and aesthetically cohesive work. Students engage in a range of focused theoretical and technical tasks to plan, produce and direct work.

    COMM6001 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 1
    This is the first in a series of courses that progressively develops the students’ skills in a specialist screen production area, through advanced craft training, collaborative workshops, practice-led research and screen project work. Students critically evaluate the theory, techniques and technologies of the specialist area.

    COMM6002 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 2
    This is the second in a series of courses that progressively develops students’ skills in a specialist area. Students identify and creatively resolve complex screen production problems through reflective professional practice, creative problem solving and screen project work.

    COMM6003 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 3
    Pre-requisite: COMM6002 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 2 
    This is the third in a series of courses that progressively develops the student’s skills in screen production in a specialist area. Students will make an innovative contribution to screen work, with a practice-led research component designed to future-proof careers in a rapidly changing, globalised screen industry.

    COMM6004 Creative Practice 1
    This course simulates real-world production practices in a studio context. Students work alongside screen industry professionals in a dynamic studio environment to make innovative screen projects for contemporary audiences. Students explore and respond to industry identified challenges, extending their skills in collaborative problem solving for screen works.

    COMM6005 Creative Practice 2
    Pre-requisite: COMM6004 Creative Practice 1
    Students collaborate in multi-disciplinary teams on one or more screen projects, synthesising advanced skills in screen production. Projects will be short form, yet not inhibited by film genre, creative scope or screen format. Students further develop their technical, conceptual and practical screen skills in a simulated studio environment to provide a strong multi-disciplinary platform for their major screen project.

    COMM6006 Advanced Screen Studies
    This course examines the aesthetic, socio-cultural and economic dimensions of screen media. It focuses on contemporary critical debates in screen theory and criticism including contemporary Hollywood, independent and art cinema, the ethics of the digital image and film sound. Students interrogate the moving image in its myriad technological forms and the cultural forces behind its production as symptomatic of mass entertainment, profit-oriented industry and art. Students acquire critical skills to situate their own project work, and negotiate the professional and social implications of contemporary visual culture.

  • Arts

    ARTS1000 Academic Writing, Communication and Research
    (No prerequisite. Compulsory course for all Arts & Sciences students) 
    This course introduces students to techniques and approaches to develop learning skills that foster successful study at university. The course covers key aspects of researching, writing and formal speaking in academic contexts, and works to develop communication skills necessary for effective participation in group learning activities and collaborative projects. Students initially learn how to locate relevant information from a broad range of printed and electronic sources and how to document and reference sources in written work. Following the information literacy component, students will produce a researched essay, developing skills in critical evaluation and synthesis of information, the development of argument, and the presentation of academic documents.

    ARTS3000 Writers Workshop Australia
    This course gives students the opportunity to reflect critically and creatively on Australian literature, and their own place in it. It will also provide students with the critical insights and technical vocabularies they need to produce creative writing, with a focus on the relationship between form, style, language and context. Students analyse texts across Australian literature in order to identify the specific techniques and contexts used to create written work. Students produce and evaluate their own work in a nominated genre.

    ARTS3008 Arts Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 200 units of credit of prior learning
    Arts internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within the industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    ARTS4030 Honours Directed Study
    The Honours Directed Study course provides an advanced learning opportunity.  Students will develop research, problem-solving and written communication skills through the completion of a major research project. The Honours Directed Study course will extend knowledge and enable students to develop applied skills and/or to refine the critical analysis of an issue relevant to their discipline or their Honours thesis project. Opportunities for a directed study project may include the development of a special individual or group project; the completion of a relevant coursework course at Notre Dame or by cross-institutional enrolment; and special project workshops.

    ARTS4050 Supervised Honours Research A
    In this course students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff, culminating in an Honours thesis.  The thesis, at its submission, will be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student's capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake a thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but they may undertake an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4051 Supervised Honours Research B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS4050 Supervised Honours Research A
    In this course students undertake a major research project with supervision by an academic member of staff, culminating in an Honours thesis.  The thesis, at its submission, will be of a publishable standard and demonstrate a student's capacity to complete an original and independent research project.  Students will normally undertake a thesis in the discipline area in which they majored, but they may undertake an interdisciplinary based project where appropriate.

    ARTS4060 Honours Research Seminar A
    The Honours Research Seminar is an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in Arts and Sciences.  Students will build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis.  Students will present their research proposals and, towards the end of their enrolment, their research findings.  This seminar is an ideal forum in which students will consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with others regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS4061 Honours Research Seminar B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS6060 Honours Research Seminar A
    The Honours Research Seminar is an essential part of a student’s Honours enrolment in Arts and Sciences.  Students will build essential skills in research practice by developing a research proposal and ethics application for their thesis.  Students will present their research proposals and, towards the end of their enrolment, their research findings.  This seminar is an ideal forum in which students will consider interdisciplinary research methods which may directly inform their work, examine issues of evidence and scholarship, and collaborate with others regarding their plans for and progress in their Honours thesis.

    ARTS5010 Research Methods
    This course provides a broad exposure to the principal forms of social science research used in counselling, educational and related social sciences. As such, it provides a basic foundation in research design, methods, data collection and data analysis for higher degree students planning to proceed to a dissertation or thesis. At the same time, it offers a general understanding of research design and methodological issues for professionals who may be required to commission investigations or approve proposals for study by others, and who need to be able to interpret and critically evaluate the findings of published research. Students gain experience in a range of qualitative and quantitative techniques which can be used by practising professionals to carry out individual or team-based action-research into issues arising from their own work settings, organisations, or wider professional activities. Emphasis is on differentiating between, and making appropriate and justified choices among, the principal paradigms or methodological approaches used by contemporary social science researchers.

    ARTS5040 Capstone A: Professional Placement
    Capstone A is a placement-based learning course that forms a foundation of industry-based skills for students enrolled in a Master of Arts. In this professional placement, students will develop the cognitive skills to reflect critically on theory and professional practice. Through a 40-hour professional placement, students will develop critical industry experience and enhance their communication skills by interpreting professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences. Through a critical reflection, all students undertaking Capstone A will apply initiative in professional practice through the drawing together of specialist knowledge and professional experience. Students will develop the following generic attributes: demonstrate self-discipline, autonomous learning, individual initiative and organisational skills; apply substantial critical skills in the examination of academic literature; develop the capacity to generate new insights as they reflect on a body of knowledge.

    ARTS5050 Capstone B: Professional Placement
    Capstone B is a placement-based learning course that extends industry-based skills for students enrolled in a Master of Arts. In this professional placement, students will further develop the cognitive skills to reflect critically on theory and professional practice. Through a 40-hour professional placement, students will develop industry experience of their discipline and enhance their communication skills by interpreting professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences. Through a critical reflection, all students undertaking Capstone B will apply initiative in professional practice through the drawing together of specialist knowledge and professional experience. Students will develop the following generic attributes: demonstrate self-discipline, autonomous learning, individual initiative and organisational skills; apply substantial critical skills in the examination of academic literature; develop the capacity to generate new insights as they reflect on a body of knowledge.

    ARTS5060 Capstone C: Research Project
    Capstone C is a project-based learning course that develops research capacities for students enrolled in a Master of Arts. The research project develops the cognitive skills to reflect critically on specialist discipline knowledge and, where appropriate, professional practice. Students identify and investigate a relevant research problem using the research methods, theories and principles applicable to their field, with a high degree of independence and autonomy. Students also refine their communication skills through the process of investigation, analysis, synthesis and transformation of complex information. The Capstone courses provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate initiative in professional practice or further learning to plan and execute a research-based project and/or piece of scholarship. Students will develop the following generic attributes: demonstrate self-discipline, autonomous learning, individual initiative and organisational skills; apply substantial critical skills in the examination of academic literature; develop the capacity to generate new insights as they reflect on a body of knowledge.

    ARTS5070 Capstone D: Research Project
    Capstone D is a project-based learning course that develops research capacities for students enrolled in a Master of Arts. The research project develops the cognitive skills to reflect critically on specialist discipline knowledge and, where appropriate, professional practice. Students identify and investigate a relevant research problem using the research methods, theories and principles applicable to their field, with a high degree of independence and autonomy. Students also refine their communication skills through the process of investigation, analysis, synthesis and transformation of complex information. The Capstone courses provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate initiative in professional practice or further learning to plan and execute a research-based project and/or piece of scholarship. Students will develop the following generic attributes: demonstrate self-discipline, autonomous learning, individual initiative and organisational skills; apply substantial critical skills in the examination of academic literature; develop the capacity to generate new insights as they reflect on a body of knowledge.

    ARTS6000 Literature Review
    In this course, students will complete a critical review of scholarly and other significant literature that relate to their thesis topic or area of study. Tuition will be provided in an intensive format or by supervision, though much of the learning approach will be student-driven and performed independently. This course will directly support the completion of a postgraduate research project, such as a thesis.

    ARTS6001 Professional Project
    The Professional Project provides an advanced learning opportunity for postgraduate students in the humanities and social sciences.  Working independently, students investigate a challenging problem using the research skills and knowledge acquired from their discipline.  Students deliver a well-reasoned and articulate report.  The Professional Project is therefore intended to apply students’ research skills, increase their proficiency within their discipline, and enhance their graduate employability.

    ARTS6002 Experience the World
    This course provides students with an opportunity to pursue unique research or professional project while on an Experience the World placement. The outcome of this course is a written or creative work of around 5000 words (or the equivalent). The Experience, the World project, will be positioned within the student’s discipline or profession and may contribute directly to a student’s thesis. Experience the World projects will be informed by relevant theory, literature and research, and will demonstrate the ethical and technical requirements of the discipline. Students might work independently or within a group, employing flexibility and sound judgement.

    ARTS6003 Research Project A
    This course, in combination with ARTS6004 Research Project B, enables students to undertake a research project of up to 10,000 words.  Equivalent project lengths may be considered for creative works.  Students pursue individual professional and/or academic research interests.  Meeting regularly with an academic supervisor, students may work individually or in a group.  Students should complete appropriate research methods training before enrolling in this course.

    ARTS6004 Research Project B
    Pre-requisite: ARTS6003 Research Project A
    This course, in combination with ARTS6003 Research Project A, enables students to undertake a research project of up to 10,000 words.  Equivalent project lengths may be considered for creative works.  Students pursue individual professional and/or academic research interests.  Meeting regularly with an academic supervisor, students may work individually or in a group.

    ARTS6005 Special Project
    This Special Project course provides students with an opportunity to pursue a unique research project, the result of which is a written or creative work of around 5000 words (or equivalent). The special project will be positioned within the student’s discipline or profession and may contribute directly to a thesis or be a published outcome of it. Special projects will be informed by relevant theory, literature and research, and will demonstrate the ethical and technical requirements of the discipline. Students may work independently or within a group, employing flexibility and sound judgement.

    ARTS6030 Professional Group Project
    The Professional Group Project provides an advanced learning opportunity for postgraduate students in the humanities and social sciences.  Working in groups, students investigate a challenging problem using the research skills and knowledge acquired from their discipline.  Students analyse the problem with an interdisciplinary lens, collaborate in a professional manner, and deliver a well-reasoned and articulate report.  The Professional Group Project is therefore intended to apply students’ research skills, increase their proficiency within their own discipline, and enhance their graduate employability.

  • Behavioural Science

    PSYC1030 Introduction to Applied Psychology A
    This course encourages students to explore and appreciate the scope of scientific approach to the understanding of human behaviour and experience. Several areas included in this course emphasise the importance of the interacting nature of body and mind, social and cultural context, and the evolutionary process on the emergence of human nature. The theoretical diversity and its application in psychology and its influence are considered central to behavioural sciences.

    PSYC1040 Introduction to Applied Psychology B
    In this course, students learn to differentiate between the commonsense and the scientific approach to understanding human behaviour and experience. Several areas included in this course emphasise the importance of diversity of perspectives, models, and theories of learning, memory, language, intelligence, emotions, motivations, perception, consciousness, and the interaction of environment and heredity. This course also traces and highlights the influence of the western philosophical ideas on psychology and encourages students to make connections between the individual, the relation, and the community levels of interaction.

    PSYC2170 Developmental Psychology
    Pre-requisite: PSYC1030 Introduction to Psychology A, PSYC1040 Introduction to Psychology B OR COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling, COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course examines human development from conception, through childhood, adolescence, adulthood and death. Topics include the following areas of developmental psychology: biological, cognitive, perceptual-motor, social, emotional, and moral development. The complex interaction of factors affecting both typical and atypical development will be examined.

    PSYC2210 Social Psychology
    Pre-requisite: PSYC1030 Introduction to Applied Psychology A AND PSYC1040 Introduction to Applied Psychology B
    Social Psychology is an examination of the effects of the group and the social context on individual cognitions, affective states and behaviours. The social context includes the actual physical presence of others as well as the effects of those who are imagined to be present and/or are symbolised by internal representations such as norms and values.  Social psychology seeks to explain social behaviours and therefore focuses heavily on the interpersonal realm. This course will explore the major social psychological theories and their application to the individual, relational, and community contexts relative to their influence on individual behaviour. It will include a critical examination of one’s social context to understand the impact of worldview, values, attitudes and social subjectivity.

    PSYC2350 Health Psychology
    Pre-requisite: PSYC1030 Introduction to Applied Psychology A AND PSYC1040 Introduction to Applied Psychology B
    This course reflects a values-based perspective that emphasises human capacity and sustainability. The principles underpinning the course include social justice, respect for diversity and equity. This course demonstrates the benefits of values based praxis and encourages students to challenge the accepted norms within society to identify structural barriers that contribute to disadvantage, and marginalisation. Using a principled practice approach to community development students are encouraged to develop new ways of thinking and working that contribute to community sustainability and create wellbeing at the individual, relational and community level.

    PSYC2620 Psychology and Religion
    Pre-requisite: Introduction to Applied Psychology A, OR PSYC1040 Introduction to Applied Psychology B 
    One of the ways by which the relationship between cognition, belief and behaviour can be studied is through the literature on the psychology of religion. The development of religious beliefs and religious experience on attitudes and behaviour has intrigued researchers, and in recent times this has seen a resurgence. In this course, students will examine in detail recent research into the psychology of religion.

    PSYC2640 Psychology of Work
    Pre-requisite: PSYC1030 Introduction to Applied Psychology A AND PSYC1040 Introduction to Applied Psychology B
    This course combines the discipline areas of social and cultural psychology with organisational and management theory to examine human behaviour within the workplace. It also draws on knowledge from the realm of political science, sociology, and anthropology to build a more complete understanding of the relationship between the individual and the organisation. Students will be challenged to develop new paradigms of thinking about the psychology of the individual in the workplace. The course challenges the tradition concept of training workers to fit into the organisation. Students are encouraged to examine the role played by cultural norms and assumptions and how these contribute to a range of issues such as workplace bullying, behavioural safety and work-family balance. In addition, students will examine the role of paid employment in our lives and consider the social and community implications of modern workplace practices.

    PSYC3000 Modes of Psychological Intervention
    Pre-requisite: PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology
    This course introduces students to the major schools of clinical therapeutic psychology: psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural, and humanistic. The key principles, techniques, and underlying philosophical viewpoints of each of these ‘schools’ of intervention will be investigated and applied (in common) to selected clinical examples.  Recent developments within these paradigms, for example, Dialectical Behavioural Therapy and Brief Psychodynamic Therapy, will also be studied so that students gain an appreciation of the developmental nature of these paradigms.

    PSYC3030 Special Topics in Applied Psychology A
    Pre-requisite: PSYC2210 Social Psychology AND PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology 
    This course will explore special interest topics at an advanced level in the area of Applied Psychology, offering critical engagement with cutting-edge research and innovation and in-depth examination of contemporary perspectives on, and interpretation of, recent trends in the field of applied psychology. Topics may include forensic or criminal psychology, organisational psychology, advanced topics in abnormal psychology, advanced topics in social psychology, the psychology of terrorism, environmental psychology, or issues in pastoral psychology.

    PSYC3050 Special Topics in Applied Psychology B
    Pre-requisite: PSYC2210 Social Psychology AND PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology 
    This course will explore special interest topics at an advanced level in the area of applied psychology, offering critical engagement with cutting-edge research and innovation and in-depth examination of contemporary perspectives on, and interpretation of, recent trends in the field of applied psychology. Topics may include forensic or criminal psychology, organisational psychology, advanced topics in abnormal psychology, advanced topics in social psychology, the psychology of terrorism, environmental psychology, or issues in pastoral psychology.

    PSYC3060 Personality Psychology
    Pre-requisite: PSYC2210 Social Psychology AND PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology 
    This course investigates descriptive and causal aspects of personality and individual difference. The course considers how theories explain specific issues such as the unconscious, the self, personality change, the effect of early childhood experiences, and the effect of motivation on personality. Major approaches to the study and assessment of personality are explored. The application of contemporary theories to organisational behaviour and abnormal psychology are also considered.

    PSYC3130 Clinical Pastoral Placement
    Pre-requisites: PSYC2210 Social Psychology, PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology
    The Clinical Pastoral Placement course is a practice course for students from a number of areas such as Chaplaincy Studies, Theology, and Applied Psychology. Students will work with clients in a hospital setting using a recognised Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) paradigm. The CPE model allows students to present case studies that express the world-view of the client in a structured form, and then critically evaluate pastoral counselling interventions. Supervision provides the opportunity for students to reflect on their role in the counselling process. Approaches to pastoral counselling are discussed, as are plans for each session.

    PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology
    Pre-requisite: PSYC1030 Introduction to Applied Psychology A AND PSYC1040 Introduction to Applied Psychology B
    In this course, there is a focus on paradigms and an overview of experimental and clinical findings to the understanding and treatment of psychopathology. The course emphasises that the understanding of psychopathology is challenging and continues to evolve. A multidimensional integrative approach is proposed and applied to a range of psychopathologies.

  • Counselling

    COUN1000 Theories and Approaches to Counselling 
    This course introduces students to common theories and approaches to counselling and the ways they can be applied in practice. The origins, development and applications of each theory together with their strengths and limitations will be presented. Similarities and differences between the theories will be explored as a means to understanding the various forms that counselling can take. The counselling relationship will be examined together with an understanding of how an integrated approach can produce truly professional counselling.

    COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    This course introduces students to therapeutic approaches that guide counselling practice such as Psychoanalytic Theory, Existential Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, and Behavioural Approaches. There is a particular emphasis on the role and importance of the ‘therapeutic alliance’. Students are introduced to the codes of practice covering ethical and professional obligations of counsellors.

    COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    In this course students learn and perform key interviewing skills using a micro skills hierarchy: listening, asking questions, reflecting, clarifying, challenging, and structuring an interview session. The micro skills hierarchy is designed to draw out client stories and issues through a basic listening sequence, leading to client change and positive action.

    COUN1010 Counselling Skills Training
    This course provides students with an introduction to the skills used in counselling. Egan's problem-management and opportunity-development model will form the basis and foundation of this course. Other counselling skills models and approaches will also be reviewed. Experiential activities will be included to encourage students to increase their awareness, understanding and sensitivity in relation to the counselling process and to practice their skills. Students will be encouraged to give and receive feedback in relation to their skills and personal styles. Videotape material and role-play in triads and small groups will be used to assist and enhance learning and training in skills.

    COUN1040 Bereavement and Loss
    This Course will explore the significance of attachment and loss and examine the nature of the normal grief response. Loss, change and bereavement will be recognized as significant human experiences which occur frequently within the lifespan and social contexts. Effective counselling and support strategies will be taught. These will give student participants confidence in their ability to help the grieving person and also reduce feelings of helplessness which so often are the response to another person's distress. An understanding of children's responses to loss and change will be included, and students will develop skills in working with families who are adjusting to the loss of a family member.

    COUN2060 Cross Cultural Counselling
    Pre-requisite: COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course facilitates the development of cultural competency in assessment and intervention with diverse cultural groups. It provides students with opportunities to explore their own world views, evaluate research on counselling across cultures as well as providing comprehensive skills to provide counselling to diverse cultural groups. Although the ability to deliver counselling across cultures is a skill learnt over a lifetime, this course provides students with practical techniques.

    COUN2080 Counselling in the Area of Alcohol and Other Drugs
    Pre-requisite: COUN10030 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    Counselling individuals with alcohol and other drug-related issues and problems require knowledge of drugs (including alcohol), and of the specific issues relevant to family members living in this environment. This course has been designed and developed to provide students with knowledge and skills required when working with clients with alcohol and/or drug-related problems.

    COUN2110 Trauma Counselling
    Pre-requisite: COUN1030 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    Trauma counselling is an often misused generic term. It refers to an interpersonal counselling process in which the counsellor assists a person affected by a traumatic event or crisis to problem-solve or manage the issues, which have created emotional difficulties or psychological disturbance. Many counsellors are called upon to provide trauma counselling as part of their professional practice. The provision of structured, short-term assistance to people in the aftermath of traumatic events requires a range of knowledge and skills in order to meet the needs of those affected.

    COUN2150 Counselling Children and Adolescents
    Pre-requisite: COUN1030 Theories and Approaches to Counselling OR COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course will help the student develop a framework for understanding the different concepts, theories and issues involved in working with children and adolescents. The student will be encouraged to understand the world of the child from varying theoretical and developmental perspectives as well as becoming familiar with the major theories of adolescent development. Students will develop an understanding of the different communication and counselling skills required for working with children and adolescents.

    COUN3002 Placement and Supervision A
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 150 units of credit of COUN prior learning
    Students undertake a clinical counselling placement with a community agency.  While on placement, students apply counselling skills underpinned by their understanding of professional practice. Students also attend a clinical supervision group on campus where placement case studies are examined and evaluated to ensure counselling best practice. Drawing on their previous learning and current placement experience, students develop a portfolio of competencies that integrates theory and consolidates their professional skills. The placement and supervision courses are the capstone courses for Counselling students.

    COUN3003 Placement and Supervision B
    Students undertake a clinical counselling placement with a community agency.  While on placement, students apply counselling skills underpinned by their understanding of professional practice. Students also attend a clinical supervision group on campus where placement case studies are examined and evaluated to ensure counselling best practice. Drawing on their previous learning and current placement experience, students develop a portfolio of competencies that integrates theory and consolidates their professional skills. The placement and supervision courses are the capstone courses for Counselling students.

    COUN3004 Counselling Couples and Families
    Pre-requisite: COUN1003 Approaches and Theories of Counselling, COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course examines the therapeutic approaches, skills, and attributes needed to counsel couples and families. A systemic perspective is used to understand couples and families as social systems. The course identifies the challenges faced by couples and families and explores therapeutic approaches to address these. Through the use of role plays, case studies, discussions, and lectures this course provides practical opportunities for students to conduct assessments, therapeutic design responses and apply their counselling skills and knowledge for couples and families.

    COUN3005 Counselling Older People
    Pre-requisite: COUN1003 Approaches and Theories of Counselling, COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course explores the therapeutic approaches, skills and attributes needed to be an effective counsellor with older people. A developmental perspective is used to understand the process of ageing from a physical, psychological, cognitive and spiritual perspective. The course identifies the challenges faced by older people and evaluates individual and group therapeutic approaches to address these challenges. Through the use of role plays, case studies, small group discussion and lectures, students acquire the skills and knowledge to conduct assessments and design therapeutic responses for older people.

    COUN3160 Counselling in High Prevalence Mental Health Disorders
    Pre-requisite: COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling OR COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    NB: PSYC3330 Abnormal Psychology will substitute for COUN3160
    Students who work with clients experiencing mental health problems require a level of understanding of these conditions that allows them to provide counselling in a competent and confident manner. This course will teach students concepts of mental wellbeing and mental illness consistent with the recovery model. Topics will include affective disorders, including depression and anxiety, and more serious mental illnesses, including the psychoses. This course will increase students’ knowledge of high prevalence mental health disorders and how best to manage clients through Counselling interventions. This course will place emphasis on the therapeutic alliance when counselling clients with mental health issues. Rogerian concepts of compassion, empathy, and unconditional positive regard are emphasised.

    COUN3170 Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues in Counselling
    Pre-requisite: COUN1003 Theories and Approaches to Counselling OR COUN1004 Counselling Skills Training 1
    This course introduces students to important issues relating to the ethical and legal nature of professional practice in counselling. Ethics of professional practice will be examined through a variety of Codes, which will, in turn, be analysed and applied to highlight ethical obligations. Issues related to the work of the professional counsellor such as interviewing, confidentiality, report writing, record keeping and access, mandatory reporting, supervision and case preparation will also be considered. Statutory and legal obligations on the counsellor within the frameworks of Australia will be covered.

    COUN5030 Counselling Couples and Families
    This course examines counselling issues that relate to working with couples and families. Firstly, it will examine family systems and structure, family development stages and changes, and the family as a social system. Secondly, it will look at the basic models of couple and family counselling and therapy. The family systems, experiential, developmental, and cognitive-behavioural models will be looked at. Thirdly, it will address assessment and interventions with couples and family issues that are typically presented in counselling. The family issues are family separation, parenting including step parenting, adolescent and behavioural problems, drug and alcohol use, grief and loss. The couple issues that will be dealt with are intimacy, sexuality, marital conflict, ambivalence, affairs and communication difficulties in relationships.

    COUN5990 Theories and Approaches to Counselling
    Prerequisite: Enrolment in the Master of Counselling
    Counsellors need to be familiar with the philosophical and theoretical approaches, which guide their practice. Many different approaches are used in counselling, depending on how the client presents with his or her problem. This course addresses a broad range of theories, including Psychoanalytic Theory, Existential Therapy, Gestalt Therapy, and Behavioural approaches.

    COUN6000 Interpersonal Group Practice
    This course examines contemporary theories of group work. Students gain an understanding of group dynamics and group processes. Students participate in an experiential group designed to provide opportunities to analyse the group's experiences by applying group theory.

    COUN6001 Counselling Skills
    This course develops advanced skills in counselling, drawing on the interpersonal skills postgraduate students acquired from professional practice and/or academic study. The course consists of demonstration, direct teaching and supervised practice in the performance of counselling skills. The course integrates a client-focused approach to counselling, linking theoretical foundations of counselling with counselling skills.

    COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling
    In this course students analyse the philosophical and theoretical frameworks guiding counselling practice. Students select appropriate evidence-based contemporary approaches based on client presentations.

    COUN6003 Approaches to Mental Health
    This course examines common mental health issues encountered in counselling practice. Students examine issues such as anxiety, depression, addictions, suicide prevention and mental health stigma. They apply contemporary research to case conceptualisation and treatment planning.

    COUN6004 Theory and Practice of Group Facilitation
    In this course, students learn the theory and practice of designing and facilitating an effective therapeutic group. The course examines managing difficulties that arise in groups, designing appropriate interventions and working with diverse groups.

    COUN6005 Family Systems and Couples
    This course examines counselling issues that relate to working with couples and families. Firstly, it examines family systems and structure, family development stages and changes, and the family as a social system. Secondly, it looks at the basic models of couples and family counselling and therapy. The family systems, experiential, developmental and cognitive behavioural models are considered. Finally, the various assessments and interventions with couples and family issues that are typically presented in counselling are addressed.

    COUN6006 Placement, Supervision and Case Studies A
    Pre-requisites: COUN6001 Counselling Skills, COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling
    In this course, students work with clients through an industry placement. Students reflect on the counselling process under the guidance of an experienced professional. Approaches to counselling are discussed, as are plans for each client session.

    COUN6007 Placement, Supervision and Case Studies B
    Pre-requisites: COUN6006 Placement, Supervision & Case Studies A
    In this course students work with clients through an industry placement.
    Students reflect on the counselling process under the guidance of an experienced professional. Approaches to counselling are discussed, as are plans for each client session.

    COUN6008 Professional Practice
    Pre-requisites: COUN6001 Counselling Skills, COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling, COUN6003 Approaches to Mental Health
    This course introduces students to the codes of practice covering professional, social and legal obligations of counsellors. Counselling in a cross-cultural context is examined. Students analyse the professional practice literature and apply their findings to diverse populations via case studies.

    COUN6009 Trauma, Loss and Grief Counselling
    This course examines historical and contemporary approaches to understanding trauma, loss and grief. It provides students with assessment and intervention skills to work effectively in these areas of counselling. Students apply theory to assess case studies and in role plays. The topics of vicarious trauma and burnout and the development of self-care plans are also examined.

    COUN6010 Specialised Counselling Approaches
    Pre-requisites: COUN6001 Counselling Skills, COUN6002 Theoretical Approaches to Counselling
    Two contemporary approaches to counselling practice are explored in this course, resulting in a detailed study of each. Students develop advanced skills in assessment and intervention, based on these specific approaches. Students apply counselling skills acquired in other courses to these approaches.

  • Communications and Media

    COMM1060 Media and Society
    This course explores how media texts engage the media consumer and influence the consumer’s notion of reality. It will enable students to consider their way of thinking about the media and society.  Media theory will allow students to use analytical principles to deconstruct and analyse the media. Students will be encouraged to read print media, listen to radio, browse the Internet and watch television through critical eyes, appreciating the art, skill and power of media representations.

    COMM1210 Introduction to Screen Production
    This course introduces students to the basic skills and theories required in the production of film and television. Students will research, write, shoot and edit short videos using the latest digital technology.

    COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course is an introduction to the nature and various aspects of daily journalism, and the fundamental issues in the practice of reporting. This course has a practical emphasis. Students are introduced to news values including the ‘who, what, when, where, why and how’—labelled famously the ‘5 W’s and H’—as well as to various approaches to the writing of news and the Journalists’ Code of Ethics. Through a variety of tasks, students will learn to compose hard news copy for publication, develop effective research, and hone interviewing and writing skills. Students will also analyse daily journalism with a focus on news and current affairs.

    COMM2010 Production: Creative Advertising
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course explores the creative dimensions of advertising. Students will be taught methodologies to deliver creative content. They will develop advertising concepts and explore the production dimensions of advertising beyond the storyboard. Students will develop creative concepts for advertising campaigns, engage imaginatively with agency briefs, and work with advertising professionals to develop their skills. This course will be of interest to students seeking to enter either the strategic or creative side of the advertising and communications industry.

    COMM2020 Screenwriting
    This course introduces the student to the fundamental building blocks of screenwriting with a focus on the art of story creation. From the conception of the seed idea, the structuring of a storyline, to the development of a treatment, this course considers the principle that skilful story making is the indispensable foundation of a successful script. Students are expected to participate in workshop exercises, analysis of films and stories, and produce a volume of creative writing culminating in the submission of a detailed short screenplay.

    COMM2030 Language of Film
    This course will introduce students to the lexicon of film and the diverse techniques through which films generate meaning. The course will encompass major movements in film history and theory: Silent to Sound, Auteur and Genre Theory, Transnational Cinemas, and the Digital Revolution in Cinema. It will challenge students to think analytically about the ways in which films construct meaning, including the uses of cinematography, editing, art direction, screenplay and sound. The course will denaturalise and deconstruct the proverbial magic of the silver screen, firmly locating film within its cultural and ideological discourses. This course is specifically designed to equip students with the analytical tools required for the Film and Screen Production major and is, therefore, a prerequisite for a number of upper-level Communications and Media courses.

    COMM2040 Digital Cultures
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 50 units of credit COMM prior learning
    This course investigates new media as a social practice in contemporary society. Utilising media and cultural studies frameworks, the course introduces advanced concepts in new media theory, including analysis of new media languages, narrative theory, audience studies, and participatory media culture. Students will gain an understanding of the theoretical concepts underpinning new media research, gaining insight into the construction of user-producers and participatory audiences, as well as the ways in which online, portable and social media interact with the traditional forms of film, television and radio. This course is designed to enhance a student’s specialisation in the study of screen production, journalism and media. Students from related disciplines with an interest in understanding new media as a reflection of social practice will also find this course relevant to their area of study.

    COMM2150 Screen Production: Skills and Practice
    This course provides students with an opportunity to further develop skills in screen production.  Using industry standard techniques, students will collaborate in workshops which focus on camera use, lighting, sound, editing and production management.  This course provides essential skills for those students who wish to pursue further screen production courses in the specialisation.

    COMM2300 Digital Media Production
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 50 units of credit of COMM prior learning
    This course introduces students to the field of digital media production. It aims to develop core competencies in the design and production of digital media that will enable students to participate effectively in a range of digital environments. Skills will be taught in a media lab. Students will work individually and within groups on creative media works, including video, audio and web design. The course is informed by recent transformations in media technologies, media convergence and participatory culture.

    COMM2330 Journalism for Television and Video
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course focuses on the theory and practice of electronic journalism. It teaches the skills required in television and new media reporting including planning, researching, filming, editing, scripting, interviewing, voice work and presentation. This course complements screen and print media courses, and equips students for advanced studies in journalism and media. It will also look at the legal and ethical aspects of television and video journalism.

    COMM2340 Journalism: Theory and Practice
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    In this course, students develop their knowledge of the theories and practices of journalism. They develop practical skills including researching, interviewing, and writing for print, broadcast and online journalism. The course also includes the application of media ethics and law, and the role of the media as the ‘Fourth Estate’.

    COMM3000 News and Current Affairs
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course investigates news and current affairs from a media studies perspective. Using the tools of critical and cultural analysis, students will investigate news narratives and codes of dramatic representation across a range of media platforms. Topics include the evolution of media theories, media and cultural identity, critical race studies, active news audiences and news communities, as well as the role of technology in shaping global news narratives and the future of the news.

    COMM3008 Communications Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of COMM prior learning
    Communications internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within the industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    COMM3040 Feature Writing
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course introduces students to longer-form journalism, focusing on the production of features in print and online. Students will build their reporting and writing skills by pursuing stories in greater depth and from new creative perspectives. Critical analysis of the variety of feature stories is central to the course. This course aims to build students’ knowledge of the structures and styles available to the writer, including voice, language, narrative technique, and - where appropriate - the use of images and sound.

    COMM3050 Media Ethics and Law
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 500cp of COMM prior learning
    The media is shaped by laws, regulations and ethical codes, which reflect underlying political, social, cultural and economic debates. This course explores these debates and how they have shaped issues such as freedom of speech, censorship, defamation, vilification, copyright and privacy. Students will investigate and compare different regulatory approaches, examine current legal and ethical debates, and discuss what our assumptions about media law and ethics tell us about ourselves and our society.

    COMM3060 Online Newsroom
    Pre-requisite: COMM2340 Journalism: Theory and Practice
    This capstone course replicates the processes and management structures of a newsroom to produce content for an online publication. The course draws together all previous subjects in the Journalism Major resulting in a final project and ePortfolio to showcase students' skills. Students will learn subediting and content management skills which will be used to develop submitted work into publication-ready content.  Students will further develop their professional and practical skills in research, writing and production by creating original content for the website. This course will provide students with an opportunity to apply journalism skills ethically and to manage projects to strict deadlines while being reflective about their practice.

    COMM3090 Adaptation Studies
    This course interrogates the theory and practice of adaptation across multiple forms, genres, and media platforms, including the adaptation of print, screen, and performance-based texts. It challenges students to think critically and creatively about the construction of cultural meaning in both classic and non-traditional adaptations, including problems associated with period and genre shifts, and narrative play. It draws together critical theory from literary, film and digital studies as well as the interdisciplinary field of adaptation studies.

    COMM3210 Interactive Media
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 500cp of COMM prior learning
    This course develops core competencies in the design and production of digital media. Students develop skills, understanding and knowledge necessary to work in a creative media environment. Students work on projects individually or in teams. Recent and on-going transformations in media technologies and participatory culture are studied. Students gain an understanding of the multi-faceted media industry from different perspectives.

    COMM3260 Advanced Screen Production: Documentary
    Pre-requisite: COMM2150 Screen Production: Skills and Practice
    This course in advanced screen production skills will see students collaborate on the research, development and production of a short documentary film. Workshops will focus on the varying practical and stylistic approaches to executing works of non-fiction using industry standard techniques and the latest broadcast quality equipment.

    COMM3270 Advanced Screen Production: Drama
    Pre-requisite: COMM2150 Screen Production: Skills and Practice
    In this course, students, working in crews and using broadcast standard technology, participate in key film crew roles, assigned in consultation with their lecturer, to make short films or TV dramas. The substantial processes of pre-production, production and post-production are assessable, and students are graded on the basis of significant work in their designated roles. Production scripts generated in other Film and Screen Production courses may be used.

    COMM3300 Documentary Studies
    This course will examine the development of the documentary from its origins to the present day. Students will explore theoretical and practical issues related to screen documentary through readings, screenings and class discussions.  Case studies will range from cinema vérité and expository documentary through to mock documentary and emerging modes. Major documentary theorists and practitioners will be considered, as will underlying issues ranging from ethical considerations involved in representing reality and other cultures, to the place of documentary in a future of global and technological convergence.

    COMM3510 Advertising and Society
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines the communication process between media text and audience at an advanced level. The course  examines major theoretical issues in communication studies, with an emphasis on the persuasive power of media. The course includes a detailed study of persuasion in advertising, as well as a broader look at the communication process at work in a range of media texts. The communication protocols of analysts, consumers, and fans is considered to bring issues of readership into the analytical equation.

    COMM3620 World Cinema
    Pre-requisite: COMM2030 Language of Film
    This course will examine a wide range of cinema to consider different approaches to the manufacture and analysis of film.  Students will explore how film developed over the twentieth century as a form of popular culture, examine the range of styles, theories and technologies which have since influenced its development, assess the conflict which it has often provoked and examine the rapidly changing landscape of twenty-first century cinematic production.   The emphasis of this course is on cinema as an art, as a critical element in popular culture and as a product of a creative industry.

    COMM3630 Australian Cinema
    This course will examine both historical and contemporary Australian films.  Students will consider the means by which cinema is an expression of Australian history and culture, as well as how film provides a medium through which our society and national identity might be interpreted.  Films considered will deal with such themes as legend and myth, suburban Australia, Aboriginality, Anzac, and the bush, the city and the beach.  Finally, this course will examine how Australian film has been both influenced by and an influence on international cinema.

    COMM3700 Radio
    Pre-requisite: COMM1420 Introduction to Journalism
    This course examines the theory and practice of radio journalism in a rapidly evolving media environment. Students research, plan and produce radio news and current affairs programs within professional legal and ethical parameters.

    COMM6000 Advanced Screen Skills Directing
    This course focuses on directing for film and screen production, developing skills in the direction of actors, cinematography, production design, sound design, editing, and production management in order to create a technically and aesthetically cohesive work. Students engage in a range of focused theoretical and technical tasks to plan, produce and direct work.

    COMM6001 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 1
    This is the first in a series of courses that progressively develops the students’ skills in a specialist screen production area, through advanced craft training, collaborative workshops, practice-led research and screen project work. Students critically evaluate the theory, techniques and technologies of the specialist area.

    COMM6002 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 2
    Pre-requisite:COMM6001 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 1
    This is the second in a series of courses that progressively develops students’ skills in a specialist area. Students identify and creatively resolve complex screen production problems through reflective professional practice, creative problem solving and screen project work.

    COMM6003 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 3
    Pre-requisite: COMM6002 Advanced Screen Skills Craft 2
    This is the third in a series of courses that progressively develops the student’s skills in screen production in a specialist area. Students will make an innovative contribution to screen work, with a practice-led research component designed to future-proof careers in a rapidly changing, globalised screen industry.

    COMM6004 Creative Practice 1
    This course simulates real-world production practices in a studio context. Students work alongside screen industry professionals in a dynamic studio environment to make innovative screen projects for contemporary audiences. Students explore and respond to industry identified challenges, extending their skills in collaborative problem solving for screen works.

    COMM6005 Creative Practice 2
    Pre-requisite: COMM6004 Creative Practice 1
    Students collaborate in multi-disciplinary teams on one or more screen projects, synthesising advanced skills in screen production. Projects will be short form, yet not inhibited by film genre, creative scope or screen format. Students further develop their technical, conceptual and practical screen skills in a simulated studio environment to provide a strong multi-disciplinary platform for their major screen project.

    COMM6006 Advanced Screen Studies
    This course examines the aesthetic, socio-cultural and economic dimensions of screen media. It focuses on contemporary critical debates in screen theory and criticism including contemporary Hollywood, independent and art cinema, the ethics of the digital image and film sound. Students interrogate the moving image in its myriad technological forms and the cultural forces behind its production as symptomatic of mass entertainment, profit-oriented industry and art. Students acquire critical skills to situate their own project work, and negotiate the professional and social implications of contemporary visual culture.

  • English Literature

    ENGL1020 The Western Literary Tradition
    Representative selections from poetry, drama and fiction, from Chaucer to the present, provide students with a broad background in Literature in English. The course places emphasis on the development and critical analysis of literary forms and genres. Students who complete the course successfully are in a sound position to make appropriate choices of courses for further study of Literatures in English.

    ENGL1040 World Literatures Today
    A variety of oral and written texts in English provides an introduction to the richness and diversity of the Literature program at Notre Dame Australia. Texts from different countries across the world are incorporated in the course. Students consider contemporary issues such as race, ethnicity and gender, and the way meanings are constructed from a vast and disparate body of writing in the context of the global village. The course also offers a basic introduction to Literary Theory.

    ENGL1050 Theory and Practice of Modern Theatre 
    This course examines popular dramatic forms from the mid-nineteenth century to the more contemporary plays of the early twentieth century. It examines realism and naturalism and the audience reaction to them and how social change and pressure contributed to the emergence of Expressionism, Surrealism, Absurdism and Epic Theatre. There is a focus on critical analysis of texts as well as opportunities to further enhance understanding through performance. Teaching mode includes lectures, tutorials and performance workshops.

    ENGL3000 Children's Literature
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    In this course, students examine literature told to or written for children and adolescents. The course takes a historic, generic and thematic approach and asks how children and their literature have been and are conceptualized as we move into the twenty-first century. Is children’s literature a cultural artefact or a means by which culture defines itself? What is the changing nature of the adult-child relationship? How do we discern and evaluate a poetics of Children’s Literature? Students examine oral tradition as well as the written tradition and screen adaptations.

    ENGL3008 English Literature Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of ENGL prior learning
    English Literature internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within the industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    ENGL3010 The Uses and Abuses of Literary Theory
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100units of credit of prior learning
    Contemporary literary theory and criticism afford us a plethora of ways to view and make sense of social, cultural and political trends, as well as challenging notions of literature and literariness. What do we understand by 'text'? What assumptions do we bring to the study of literature, and to the acts of reading and writing? How ideologically innocent are our critical judgements? The course asks these and other questions and considers the contribution of the likes of key literary theorists in formulating a response. The course involves a range of approaches to a limited number of texts

    ENGL3030 Gothic Literature and its Legacy
    Pre-requisite: Completion on 100cp of prior learning
    Gothic Literature and its Legacy explores the origins and nature of the British literary Gothic and traces the form’s evolution and influence. From humble origins, arguably with the Castle of Otranto, the Gothic was an initially maligned mode that emerged into the rationality of the 18th Century and then went on to shape the literary product of its own and future times. At once scandalous and innovative, the Gothic is defined as a literature of terror, of excess and of imaginative freedom that allowed works as diverse as Frankenstein, Dracula and Wuthering Heights to rewrite the possibilities for fiction. This course explores the development of this influential mode through key literary texts.

    ENGL3040 Modernism and the Avant-Garde
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course explores the dynamic upheavals and literary experiments of the late-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries. Through readings of these and other texts, including philosophy and cinema, the course considers the various influences of key modernist movements such as imagism and surrealism and stylistic innovations such as stream of consciousness. It will also explore the intersections between modernism and avant-garde culture in Europe, and includes a study of themes such as Imperialism, the Great War, the crisis in representation and shifting gender relations in the modernist period.

    ENGL3060 Australian Theatre 
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines some of the greatest examples of Australian theatre from the mid‐nineteenth century to the present day. Students explore dramatic styles employed by Australian playwrights and the power of theatre in Australian literary and popular culture, and may also consider how they compare to the creative works of Australian cinema and television.  Students also examine how Australian plays express a variety of important themes, in what fashion they might be an expression of history and culture, and how they reflect our society.

    ENGL3100 The Art and Craft of Travel Writing
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    In this course, students engage with the academic as well as the creative process as a means of better understanding the art and craft of travel writing. Such writing is an exercise in deciphering and understanding self, place and society. Through a detailed examination of key aspects of the craft, students will develop critical understandings of the significant themes and methods of travel writing in both historical and contemporary contexts.  The course enhances communication skills and technical competence and promotes critical and reflective thinking in an interdisciplinary context.

    ENGL3160 Australian Literature And The Post Colonial Challenge
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    A focus on exciting and innovative developments in Australian fiction, poetry and drama since is a feature of this course. A study is made of the movement away from the intense nationalism and the realism characteristic of Australian literature in the early years of the twentieth century. Students consider the ways in which the spiritual and cultural uncertainties of contemporary Australian life are reflected in the literature and film of the period and explore contemporary attitudes to history, myth, memory, imagination and a changing awareness of 'place' in the national consciousness.

    ENGL3310 Classical and Romantic Poetry
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course covers the period in English poetry from the Elizabethan age to the early decades of the twentieth century. Representative forms and genres are considered, including epic, narrative and lyrical poetry and the nature and purpose of verse satire. The course includes a study of the social and intellectual context of English poetry during this period.

    ENGL3320 The Novel in English
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course covers the evolution and development of the novel in English. How has literary experimentation altered the genre? How and why has English emerged to better suit the needs of contemporary writers in a broader context? Students will study the relationship between selected novels and the historical, social and cultural context in which they were written. The implications of contemporary literary theory will also be examined as students critically approach the works of select novelists.

    ENGL3410 Drama in the Age of Shakespeare
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course involves a close study of a significant number of Shakespeare’s histories, tragedies and comedies. These plays are considered in the context of the variety of Elizabethan and Jacobean stages for which they were written, and on which they were performed. The plays of Shakespeare are studied in the context of the comedies and tragedies of some of his contemporaries.

    ENGL3820 Freedom from Oppression: Literature that changed the world
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course focuses on the power of words and the dynamic nature of literature in the context of the political nature of the acts of reading and writing. How useful are they in the ongoing battle for freedom and basic human rights? The course examines some of the fiction and non-fiction written in English and originating in diverse areas across the globe. It considers the role of this literature in framing peoples’ experiences and helping them to make sense of their political, religious and physical landscapes. The course explores how we ‘read’ history in the making, how we separate it from cultural mythology, and the place of literature in efforts to achieve meaningful and lasting dialogue within and between torn and divided communities. Importantly, the course asks what is freedom’ and what is ‘oppression’. How fine is the line which divides them? How are individuals and nations (dis)empowered through the use of the written and spoken word? Indeed, what is ‘power’?

  • History

    HIST1000 A History of Western Civilisation
    This course looks at the rise of what is commonly referred to as ‘Western Civilisation’.  Tracing the development of western society from the ancient world to the twenty-first century, it interrogates assumptions that underpin popular perceptions of the West and explores what it means to be ‘civilised’ and ‘western’. It encourages students to reassess the West’s interactions with diverse non-western cultures and introduces students to simple historiographical issues. This course provides a strong base for historical study in all fields of history and critical thought, requiring students to engage with concepts such as civilisation, empire, dark ages, enlightenment, democracy, colonisation and modernisation.  In addition, students will consider such fundamental issues as the politics and construction of western history, the use of evidence and sources by historians, and the skills and practice of history itself.

    HIST1001 Making Australian History
    In a little over two centuries since the arrival of the first European settlers, Australians have transformed the face of their continent. This course begins by looking at the social, environmental and military consequences of the 18th century decision to build a British convict society on aboriginal land. To what extent were the colonists successful in recreating the political world and social inequalities of British society in the antipodes? How did the Australian people forge a new identity in the land that Wentworth called a ‘New Britannia’ and Henry Lawson described as a ‘young tree green’.  This course turns common perceptions about Australian history on its head, searching for the origins of modern Australian identity in the tumultuous, inspiring and extraordinary stories of eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth century Australia.  In addition to this, students will consider such fundamental issues as the politics and manufacture of history in Australia, the use of evidence and sources by historians, and the skills and practice of history itself.  This course is ideally suited to students planning to take a major in history or preparing to teach within the national curriculum framework, and will be a useful elective to complement studies in a wide range of disciplines offered by the University.

    HIST2000 Writing Lives
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course explores the role of the individual in history from antiquity to the modern world. It will focus not only on the role and impact of these individuals but also on the way in which they have been represented in historiography. It will challenge students to think critically about the way in which human beings perceive themselves and others and the way that changes in time, culture and politics can affect and form our understanding of history. The course will explore the relationship between biographical interpretations and available evidence. Themes may include the study of women, everyday persons, military and political leaders, monarchs, popes, saints, mythical figures, and religious leaders. The course is specifically designed to meet the needs of history majors and secondary education students wishing to teach ancient and modern history.

    HIST2002 Ancient Worlds
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    The course explores various civilisations of the ancient and may focus on regions such as Ancient Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean, Oceania, Europe, Asia and the Americas. It is multi-disciplinary in nature, incorporating various approaches drawn from archaeology, anthropology, art history, classics and ancient history. It seeks to interrogate the connections between the various regions of the ancient world while recognising and examining the diversity and distinctiveness of world cultures and the individuals and groups which comprised them. Ancient Worlds also critically examines contemporary concerns about globalisation and communication by investigating the interactions of ancient peoples and their changing relationships over time. The course further encourages meaningful discussion on what it means to be human and share a common history in the 21st century. The course provides a strong contextual framework for history majors and minors at UNDA and meets the needs of secondary education students seeking accreditation in teaching ancient history.

    HIST2003 Modern America: From Slave Nation to Superpower
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course looks at major developments in modern American history from the declaration of independence in 1776, to its emergence as a global superpower in the aftermath of World War Two. The course develops chronologically and thematically, looking at the ideas and events which have shaped modern America. In this context, Puritanism, slavery, the ‘wild west’, civil rights, and anti-communism are examined in relation to their impact on American society. A series of ‘American portraits’ also provides an insight into the social history of the men and women who have made America. Beyond the glitz of the White House and the horror of the civil war, we also look at the other side of the ‘American dream’, examining how issues of race, poverty and ethnicity have affected the great ‘melting pot’ of the USA.

    HIST2010 Australia and the Asia Pacific: from Past to Present
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course explores Australia's changing relationship with the Asia Pacific region, from colonial times to the present. It will historically interrogate the cultural, political, imperial and economic dimensions of this complex and evolving relationship, from Japan to Viet Nam, New Zealand to Papua and New Guinea. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the historiography, analyse textual and media representations, and reflect upon the importance and changing nature of Australia's regional relationships and interactions over time. While this is a history course that will meet the needs of future historians and secondary education teachers, it may also be of interest to students whose area of specialisation may require them to engage with the Asia Pacific region, for example in law, media, politics or business.

    HIST2013 A History of Ancient Greece
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    A History of Ancient Greece explores the origin and nature of one of the world's most unique ancient cultures.  This course investigates the political, military, social and cultural development of Greek civilisation from its earliest foundations at Crete and Mycenae to the triumph of the city-states of Athens and Sparta and finally through to the Hellenistic World. Themes may include empire, trade, religion, colonisation, gender, art, literature, the evolution of political structures, the impact of individual agency and historiography.  A History of Ancient Greece will promote multiliteracy by teaching students the value of the material as well as written evidence in understanding and interpreting the ancient world.  This course explores the importance of the Greek legacy to Western Civilisation more broadly. The course is specifically designed to meet the needs of history majors and secondary education students wishing to teach ancient history.

    HIST2016 A History of Crime: Assessing the Evidence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Some call it a ‘sinister allure’ while cultural criminologists refer to the ‘joy of transgression’ and the ‘delight in being deviant’. Crime fascinates and is now one of the most popular genres of history. This course studies the way that crime and criminality has contributed to modern Australian history. It pays particular attention to social relationships underpinning crime and develops an understanding of key social justice issues related to the politics of crime. Students in this course assess specific crimes, criminals and criminal periods for what they reveal about society at the time. Students study a range of sources in this course to consider the history of crime, including private and government archives, prison and police records, photographs, literature, film, letters, diaries and oral histories. Upon completion of this course, students will have examined the representation of crime in modern culture and society, in Australia and abroad.

    HIST2017 Screening History: The Politics of Moving Pictures
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines the significance of the medium of film as a political and historical device. Issues examined in this course include the impact of film upon popular perceptions of the past, the interaction between ‘art’ and ‘propaganda’ in the construction of modern cinema, and the role of filmmakers as teachers and interpreters of history. The social history of the film industry as a site for political struggle is also analysed.

    HIST2018 Australians and the World Wars
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Australia has been indelibly shaped by the mythology of war and Anzac. This course studies the way that war (and peace) has contributed to our identity as a nation. It pays particular attention to the World Wars of the Twentieth Century, including the events which precipitated such calamitous outbreaks of conflict in 1914 and 1939; the Australian stories of war, abroad and on the home front; the international politics, power and heightened ideologies of the age; dissent, conscription and rebellion; the importance of such events as the Spanish Civil War in the shaping of further conflict; and the way in which Australia and the world experienced the aftermath of war. Students in this course will consider how Australia’s participation in the World Wars shaped our relationship with the world, impacted on Australia’s domestic politics, and changed the nature of Australian society. Students will study a range of sources in this course to consider the history and politics of war, including private and government archives, speeches, photographs, literature, film, letters, diaries and oral histories. At its end, students will have examined the legacy of war in Australia. They will also have questioned whether the conflicts of 1914 and 1939 were ever truly Australia’s war.

    HIST2021 The History and Politics of Southeast Asia
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course thoroughly examines contemporary issues in Southeast Asia and explores how the various countries in the region have sought to forge new national identities in the wake of European colonisation. There will be a strong emphasis on issues such as warfare, security, and terrorism, the impact of communism and Islam; and the influence of the region's history. Students will be asked to consider the future of Southeast Asia nations within the wider Asia-Pacific Region, and their relationship with Western countries such as Australia.

    HIST2023 Making History and the Politics of the Past
    Pre-requisite: HIST2023: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    History is often in the headlines,' writes Graeme Davison. 'Never before, perhaps, have historians occupied as prominent a place in public life.' He is right, of course. Many of us have watched in the past two decades as writers, politicians, journalists, economists and other leaders have been embroiled in the so-called 'History Wars'. So much is at stake. Those who write the past, own the past; and those who own the past help determine the future. This course will explore the controversial relationship between historians, cultural critics, politicians, educators and other civic leaders. It considers the manufacture of history, and tests the values, theories and ideologies which infuse our understanding of the past.

    HIST2026 The European Middle Ages, c.450-c.1250
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The European Middle Ages offers an overview of this fascinating and fundamental period of Western Civilisation. This course develops key understandings of the foundational moments in Western, and particularly Christian, history by studying areas such as, the foundation of western law; Europe's Roman and Christian inheritance; the history and influence of the Church; Mediaeval, western intellectual trends; Christendom’s relationship with Byzantium and the Islamic world; the development of commerce, economics and international trade as well as art and cultural experiences.

    HIST2027 Renaissance to Enlightenment, 1250 – 1789
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course provides coverage of European History as it shifts from a mediaeval mindset into the early modern world.  Students would be encouraged to observe and analyse the Western world’s changing priorities through a study of key areas of historical interest such as the history and influence of the Church, the West’s relationship with Byzantium, the Islamic World and ‘the New World’, intellectual movements and thinkers, including trends such as scholasticism,  Christian humanism, the scientific revolution and the enlightenment. This course will cover some of the major shifting political and economic developments of Europe, from Feudalism to the rise of the nation-state.

    HIST2028 Visual Evidence: Art and Artefacts in the Western Tradition
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Visual Evidence: Art in the Western Tradition presents critical approaches to significant themes in the history of Western Art from the Ancient World to the 20th century. The course develops key understandings of the foundational moments in Western, and particularly Christian, history by engaging with and deconstructing extant visual texts. Specifically, the course will promote multiliteracy by teaching students how to 'read' and critically assess the visual texts as a valid document of the attitudes, ideals and concerns of past societies by exploring themes such as spirituality and devotion, iconoclasm, humanism, civic pride, imperialism, absolutism, colonialism, revolution, technological advancement, World War I and II. Visual texts are a traditionally overlooked area of historical research; this course underlines the importance of visual texts in history by helping the students to develop a vocabulary, or metalanguage, to talk about them and to extract meaning from them.

    HIST3000 Writing Lives: Personalities in History from Antiquity to the Present
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    This course explores the role of the individual in history from antiquity to the modern world. It will focus not only on the role and impact of these individuals but also on the way in which they have been represented in historiography. It will challenge students to think critically about the way in which human beings perceive themselves and others and the way that changes in time, culture and politics can affect and form our understanding of history. The course will explore the relationship between biographical interpretations and available evidence. Themes may include the study of women, everyday persons, military and political leaders, monarchs, popes, saints, mythical figures, and religious leaders. The course is specifically designed to meet the needs of history majors and secondary education students wishing to teach ancient and modern history.

    HIST3008 History Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    History internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within the industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    HIST3016 A History of Crime: Assessing the Evidence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    Some call it a ‘sinister allure’ while cultural criminologists refer to the ‘joy of transgression’ and the ‘delight in being deviant’. Crime fascinates and is now one of the most popular genres of history. This course studies the way that crime and criminality has contributed to modern Australian history. It pays particular attention to social relationships underpinning crime and develops an understanding of key social justice issues related to the politics of crime. Students in this course assess specific crimes, criminals and criminal periods for what they reveal about society at the time. Students study a range of sources in this course to consider the history of crime, including private and government archives, prison and police records, photographs, literature, film, letters, diaries and oral histories. Upon completion of this course, students will have examined the representation of crime in modern culture and society, in Australia and abroad.

    HIST3018 Australians and the World Wars
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    Australia has been indelibly shaped by the mythology of war and Anzac. This course studies the way that war (and peace) has contributed to our identity as a nation. It pays particular attention to the World Wars of the Twentieth Century, including the events which precipitated such calamitous outbreaks of conflict in 1914 and 1939; the Australian stories of war, abroad and on the home front; the international politics, power and heightened ideologies of the age; dissent, conscription and rebellion; the importance of such events as the Spanish Civil War in the shaping of further conflict; and the way in which Australia and the world experienced the aftermath of war. Students in this course will consider how Australia’s participation in the World Wars shaped our relationship with the world, impacted on Australia’s domestic politics, and changed the nature of Australian society. Students will study a range of sources in this course to consider the history and politics of war, including private and government archives, speeches, photographs, literature, film, letters, diaries and oral histories. At its end, students will have examined the legacy of war in Australia. They will also have questioned whether the conflicts of 1914 and 1939 were ever truly Australia’s war.

    HIST3028 Visual Evidence: Art and Artefacts in the Western Tradition
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of HIST prior learning
    Visual Evidence: Art in the Western Tradition presents critical approaches to significant themes in the history of Western Art from the Ancient World to the 20th century.   The course develops key understandings of the foundational moments in Western, and particularly Christian, history by engaging with and deconstructing extant visual texts.  Specifically, the course will promote multiliteracy by teaching students how to 'read' and critically assess the visual texts as a valid document of the attitudes, ideals and concerns of past societies by exploring themes such as spirituality and devotion, iconoclasm, humanism, civic pride, imperialism, absolutism, colonialism, revolution, technological advancement, World War I and II. Visual texts are a traditionally overlooked area of historical research; this course underlines the importance of visual texts in history by helping the students to develop a vocabulary, or metalanguage, to talk about them and to extract meaning from them.

  • Mathematics

    MATH1020 Statistics
    This course is designed to further the knowledge of students on number analysis, using statistical measures and using tools to visualise numbers and patterns such as using Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). It provides a broad introduction to statistical practice and data analysis techniques. It aims to equip students with a basic understanding of statistics, such that they are able to employ appropriate methods of analysis in various circumstances. The techniques learnt are widely used in the sciences, social sciences, business areas and many other fields of study. This course is an essential part of the mathematics program and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training for Education students.

    MATH1030 Principles of Mathematics
    Principles of Mathematics covers the important basic concepts in algebra and trigonometry that a tertiary student is expected to master to undertake advanced mathematical concepts at upper-level mathematics courses at the University of Notre Dame.

    The course is designed to further the knowledge of students in the fields of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithm and trigonometric functions. The student is also expected to understand and apply trigonometric identities and functions to solve practical mathematical problems. The course also covers analytical geometry and topics in matrices, sequences and systems of linear equations.

    Overall the course provides a strong grounding in algebra and trigonometry at a tertiary level for further advanced mathematical studies. This course is an essential part of the mathematics program and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training for Education students.

    MATH2000 Linear Algebra
    Pre-requisite: MATH1030 Principles of Mathematics
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the area of linear algebra. The course introduces vectors and vector spaces covering addition of vectors, scalar multiplication and the geometric meaning of vectors. The theory of matrices is also developed and includes matrix addition and multiplication, inverse matrices, determinants and the use of Gaussian elimination to solve systems of equations. Matrix theory is also applied to the study of linear transformations.

    MATH2010 Mathematics and Technology
    This course will cover the intersection between mathematics and technology. This will include a study of dynamic geometry, curve sketching as well as the use of spreadsheets, the internet and graphics calculators in maths. Students will learn to use audio-visual equipment and multimedia, the SMART Board interactive whiteboard, scientific and graphic calculators, computers and software applications, games, spreadsheets with macros and Visual Basic, dynamic geometrical applications and the World Wide Web to teach mathematics to secondary students. The use of technology to write and present mathematics applications will be central to the study of this course. This course is an essential part of the mathematics program and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training for Education students.

    MATH2020 Calculus
    Pre-requisites: MATH1030 Principles of Mathematics
    This course introduces students to Calculus, a fundamental area of mathematics involved in studying the behaviour of single variable functions. The course covers limits, differentiation, integration and the applications of calculus, including maximising and minimising functions.

    MATH3030 Discrete Mathematics
    Pre-requisite: MATH2000 Linear Algebra
    This course introduces students to areas of discrete mathematics. The course covers relations, including equivalence relations and partial orderings; algorithms; areas of number theory, including induction and recursion; proofs; and graph theory, including an introduction to trees and their applications.

    MATH3040 Advanced Calculus
    Pre-requisite: MATH2020 Calculus
    This course extends students’ knowledge of Calculus. The course covers differential equations, series, multivariable functions, integration, partial differential equations and applications of these theories including modelling physical problems.

    MATH5000 Principles of Mathematics
    Principles of Mathematics is a foundational mathematics course. This course provides the fundamental skills and mathematical literacy functions necessary to undertake more advanced mathematical study. Principles of Mathematics covers the areas of algebra, trigonometry, polynomials and equations. It is designed to further students’ mathematical content knowledge as well as their skills in communicating complex mathematical knowledge and ideas.

    MATH5001 Linear Algebra
    Pre-requisite: MATH5000 Principles of Mathematics
    Co-requisite: MATH5000 Principles of Mathematics
    This course introduces advanced topics and concepts in linear algebra. Systems of equations, matrices, determinants, vectors, linear transformations and spectral theory are all covered in this course.

    MATH5002 Statistics
    This course provides an introduction to statistical theory. It equips students with an understanding of statistical practices and data analysis techniques. It covers data analysis, probability, random variables and the use of statistical software.

    MATH5003 Advanced Calculus
    Pre-requisite: MATH5030 Calculus
    Advanced Calculus is designed to instruct students in areas of modern calculus and its applications to real world phenomena. The course covers differential equations, modelling, series, multivariable functions, integration and partial differential equations. It is designed to further students’ mathematical content knowledge as well as their skills in communicating complex mathematical knowledge and ideas.

    MATH5004 Discrete Mathematics
    Pre-requisite: MATH5001 Linear Algebra
    This course in discrete mathematics covers relations, including equivalence relations and partial orderings; algorithms; areas of number theory, including induction and recursion; proofs; and graph theory, including an introduction to trees and their applications. It is designed to further students’ mathematical content knowledge as well as their skills in communicating complex mathematical knowledge and ideas.

    MATH5020 Advanced Algebra and Geometry 
    This is a course designed to further the knowledge of students in pure mathematics in the areas of algebra and geometry. It builds introduces advanced topics and concepts and begins with the study of Sequences and Series followed by the concept of Groups, Rings and Fields, then spherical and hyperbolic geometry. There is also a focus on Polynomial Functions and Complex Numbers followed by a study of projective geometry. Symmetry and topology is covered in detail followed by the Systems of Linear Equations. The course then looks at Matrix Arithmetic, Determinants, Vectors, Vector Arithmetic and Algebra and finally Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors. This course is an essential part of the mathematics program and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training.

    MATH5030 Calculus 
    This course in calculus provides a solid foundation in the theory and applications of differential and integral calculus to a variety of real-world situations. The course begins with some preliminary material that reviews the concept of a function and of basic problem-solving techniques and includes limits, differentiation, graph sketching, integration and inverse functions. Apart from imparting technical knowledge on rules of integration and differentiation, the course requires students to solve conceptual problems, thus enhancing their understanding of the principles of calculus. The key aim of this course is to make students understand, appreciate and finally enjoy and embrace calculus. Successful completion of Calculus will ensure that students have the necessary preparation and foundation for subsequent major studies in mathematics, in particular, Advanced Calculus. This course is an essential part of the mathematics program and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training.    A key feature of this course is the project-based approach. Students are assigned projects. As each topic is taught, students are asked to apply their learning to the project and, as a part of their assessment, students are asked to submit their project report. Thus students will be able to apply the knowledge in a real-life setting.

    MATH5080 Teaching Methods in Mathematics
    Teaching Methods in Mathematics is a course designed to teach teachers how to master the skills of planning, teaching, and assessing units of work in Mathematics from the Year 7 to 12 Mathematics syllabus from the NSW Board of Studies. Teachers will gain a deep understanding of pedagogical practices and develop advanced pedagogical skills in assessment design and the capacity to integrate theory and practice in pedagogy and curriculum. There is a specific focus on teaching methods for stages 4, 5 and 6 Mathematics. The course also provides professional experience for the teachers to apply the pedagogical methods and practices in classroom settings to teach Mathematics at these stages at high school. The course also addresses the Graduate Teacher Standards of Elements prescribed by the NSW Institute of Teachers. This course is an essential part of the Master of Mathematics Education degree and is specifically designed in consultation with education providers to meet the needs of teacher training.

    MATH5090 Research Methods in Mathematics
    Research Methods in Mathematics is a course designed to develop deep knowledge and critical analysis of an advanced mathematical topic. Students further develop the skills of research, critical analysis and how to develop and further ideas on advanced mathematical topics. The course provides the knowledge and assistance for students to study and research pure and applied mathematical concepts and then write a professional research paper on the assigned topic. The course addresses the need to develop analytical and critical skills in complex mathematical theories and practices. It also addresses the need to do guided research and formulate grounded critical analysis on advanced mathematical concepts.

    MATH5100 Research Projects in Mathematics A
    Research Projects in Mathematics is a whole year course designed to develop mathematics research or do an applied mathematical project in cooperation with education providers. Students will develop a proposal and then be guided through the phases of conducting research on a mathematical topic or an applied mathematical project with an academic supervisor.

    In the case of a research project, the student will do a literature review, conduct research and then write a final research work of 15,000 words to be submitted for examination.  In the case of an applied mathematical project in cooperation with education providers, the student will conduct the applied research and write a final project work of 15,000 words to be submitted for examination.

    MATH5101 Research Projects in Mathematics B
    Pre-requisite: MATH5100 Research Projects in Mathematics A
    Research Projects in Mathematics is a whole year course designed to develop mathematics research or do an applied mathematical project in cooperation with education providers. Students will develop a proposal and then be guided through the phases of conducting research on a mathematical topic or an applied mathematical project with an academic supervisor.

    In the case of a research project, the student will do a literature review, conduct research and then write a final research work of 15,000 words to be submitted for examination.  In the case of an applied mathematical project in cooperation with education providers, the student will conduct the applied research and write a final project work of 15,000 words to be submitted for examination.

  • Philosophy

    PHIL1020 Basic Method & Problems of Philosophy
    See details

    PHIL1030 Critical Thinking
    See details

    PHIL2010 Introduction to Formal Logic
    See details

    PHIL2060 Philosophy of Science
    See details

    PHIL2070 Philosophy of Language
    See details

    PHIL2100 History of Philosophy: Ancient
    See details

    PHIL2110 History of Philosophy: Medieval
    See details

    PHIL2130 History of Philosophy: Modern
    See details

    PHIL2140 History of Philosophy: Contemporary
    See details

    PHIL3000 Aquinas: Analytic and Phenomenological Approaches
    See details

    PHIL3010 Business Ethics
    See details

    PHIL3030 Introduction to Metaphysics
    See details

    PHIL3040 Metaphysics, Being, and God
    See details

    PHIL3050 Aesthetics: The Philosophy of Art
    See details

    PHIL3060 Faith and Reason
    See details

    PHIL3080 Natural Law
    See details

    PHIL3090 Moral Philosophy
    See details

    PHIL3150 Philosophy of Love and Friendship
    See details

    PHIL3210 Philosophy of the Human Person
    See details

    PHIL3300 Epistemology: Ways of Knowing
    See details

    PHIL3410 Political Philosophy
    See details

    PHIL3520 Philosophy of Religion
    See details

  • Politics

    POLI1000 Introduction to World Politics
    (No prerequisite: Essential for Major)
    This course looks at international issues and ideologies, and how they shape our increasingly 'globalised' political world. As such, the course seeks to unravel contemporary international relations, examining the importance of the USA as a global superpower in a 'uni-polar' world, European integration, the United Nations and the plight of the 'Third World'. Using an issue based approach students look at the impact of war, HIV/AIDS, ethnic conflict, environmental crisis and regional economic competition on world politics. What ideas are used to explain these processes? And what does it all mean for the political future of our planet?

    POLI1001 Politics, Democracy and Governance in Australia
    (No prerequisite: Essential for Major)
    The aim of this course is to give students an understanding of Australian politics at both an institutional and social level. By discussing contemporary issues, the course leads into an examination of the key concepts, institutions and ideologies which have shaped the Australian political system. Important contemporary debates, like those over Aboriginal land rights, the republic, immigration restrictions and labour relations are used to test political theories on the nature and practice of government and society in Australia. Throughout the course, students are expected to utilise a range of media resources including the press, radio and current affairs programmes.

    POLI3000 Religion and World Politics
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course broadly examines the role that religion and plays in contemporary international relations (IR). Key concepts and historical dynamics are critically introduced. Examples include but are not limited to: the rise/return of 'religion' in the study of international affairs; the definitions of 'religion' from an IR perspective; the agency of religion in post-colonial politics; the resurgence of religion in the post-Cold War order; trends of religion in global politics today. In addition, the course critically analyses the impact of religion upon contemporary world politics. Examples include but are not limited to: nation-state identity; diplomacy and peace-building; Catholic actors and interests in the international system; global governance; international security and terrorism; international development.

    POLI3002 Political Philosophy
    (Course run by School of Philosophy. Prerequisite: Completion of 1st year)  
    This course examines the influence of philosophers and their philosophies on current day social organization. Prominent themes include democracy and other political systems, power, private property, freedom, equality, human nature, civil disobedience, liberalism, feminism, social control, and the relationship between politics and religion.

    POLI3003 Setting the Agenda: The Media and Politics
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course investigates the role the media plays within the political process in Australia and compares this to experiences abroad. Students examine: the way that news is made; the political interests that are represented by different media groups and the essentials of developing media strategies.

    POLI3006 Public Policy and Practice: The Business of Government
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course is designed to familiarise students with the theories, models and processes of public and social policy making. It is intended to provide an understanding of the role of the public sector, its management and the ways in which policy is devised, implemented and evaluated. The course also examines some key policy areas.

    POLI3008 Politics Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of POLI prior learning
    Politics internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    POLI3009 Australian Foreign Policy
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course looks at the changing nature of Australian foreign policy. Originally established as an outpost of the British Empire, Australian foreign policy has altered dramatically over the last two centuries as the nation has constantly redefined its 'national interests'. Australia's diplomatic relations with Britain, Europe, the United States and Asia are examined in some detail. This course also examines controversial aspects of past and present Australian Foreign policy; including the Cold War, the White Australia Policy, military alliances and conflict, East Timor, the United Nations, etc. Fundamentally the course examines how Australia perceives itself, and what this means for our relations with the rest of the world.

    POLI3012 The Politics and History of Genocide
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Apologists for western civilisation, such as Francis Fukuyama and Marvin Perry, suggest that the modern West is perhaps the pinnacle of human achievement in human culture and political liberty.  Edwin Locke goes so far as to suggest that the ‘greatness of the West is not an “ethnocentric” prejudice; it is an objective fact’.  Yet in the last hundred years alone, western societies have repeatedly engaged in war, ideological extremism and genocide.  The deliberate physical and cultural destruction to which millions of peoples in the West and in the developing world have been subjected suggests that the triumph of the twentieth century is a hollow one indeed. This course will provide students with an opportunity to examine the sensitive issue of genocide in the modern world.  It will make use of case studies to highlight political, historical and sociological perspectives on genocide, including the relationship between social, cultural and institutional power that contribute to the conditions and acts of genocide; the emergence in history of ‘genocide’ as an internationally recognised crime; and the political diversity and continuity between contexts where genocide has occurred. Finally, this critical and comparative approach will consider principles and policy options which may prevent the horror of genocide occurring in the future.

    POLI3014 Terrorism and Intelligence
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of courses
    The tragedy of 9-11 has raised fundamental questions about how nations collect and analyse intelligence, and about how to ensure that past security blunders and missed opportunities are not repeated.

    In Australia, the first order response to fight the war on terror has been to make new laws and to extend the powers and resources of the intelligence community. This course will critically examine the nature and causes of terrorism. It will assess, too, the manner in which the security sector serves a continually changing agenda, given post-9/11 needs and concerns. Students will analyse how the war on terrorism impacts collection of intelligence data, analysis, and counterintelligence, as well as legal and moral standards of security policies and practices.

    POLI3015 Nationalism, Ethnicity and Race
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    The revival of nationalism as a political force has had a profound influence on international politics and has affected the domestic politics of all nation-states.  In the global environment of the modern world, nationalism remains an essential element of political and cultural identity. While nationalism, ethnicity and race are contested concepts, they are critical in developing our understanding of such issues as genocide, war, terrorism, security and diplomacy.  This unit assesses considers nationalism, ethnicity and race as amongst the most powerful political and ideological forces of the contemporary world.

    POLI3022 The Modern Middle East
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of courses
    This aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the turbulent history and volatile politics of the Middle Eastern region, including Iran, Turkey, Afghanistan, and Israel. The course traces the origins of the tension between Middle-Eastern culture and Western culture back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of World War 1, and extends to the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. In particular, the course will examine the rise of a new Pan-Islamic identity in the Middle East during the Twentieth Century, and the corresponding, though not necessarily complementary, rise of the nation state. There will be discussion on the creation of the Jewish state of Israel and the subsequent struggles which have occurred as a result, including the current Israel-Palestine question.

    POLI3023 Strategy, Security and Diplomacy
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Diplomacy is used by states as an alternative means of influencing the actions of other states, and is an alternative to armed conflict.  This course is designed to introduce students to new directions in the study of diplomacy, security and intelligence, to help develop a fundamental knowledge of strategic studies and examine the major issues that shape the field such as the evolution of modern warfare. Since the late 1980s, there has been a remarkable change in the way security is conceived, studied and practised. The field of strategy and diplomacy has been the subject of intense academic and political debate during this period.  The main aim of this course is to introduce students to main debates in security studies by tracing elements from its Cold War past to the post-9-11 era and opening up alternative ways of thinking about future trends and transformations.

    POLI3024 USA Foreign Policy since 1945
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course briefly looks at major developments in the foreign policy of the United States since 1945. Following the emergence of the USA as a global superpower in the aftermath of World War Two, this course examines the United States’ engagement with the rest of the world. In particular, and in the context of the Cold War, the United States’ decades-long global struggle against Communism is examined in considerable detail. We will also look at the ‘New World Order’ proclaimed by President Bush in 1991 during the Gulf War. 9/11 and US Foreign policy in relation to the ‘War on Terror’ are also analysed.

  • Research Methods

    RSCH2030 Research Methods
    This course introduces students to research methods in the social sciences. In developing an understanding of the social research process in general and the quantitative research process in particular, students will extend their knowledge of the principle concepts and methodologies of their majors. Students apply their knowledge and understanding to design and produce a small-scale, independent research project in which they analyse quantitative data using an appropriate statistical analysis tool. The course is research and writing intensive and is not a statistical or mathematical course per se.

  • Social Justice

    SOJS1000 Introduction to Social Justice
    In the context of widespread global poverty, criticisms of local and global inequalities and questions over the consequences of environmental and social degradation, social justice is a concept gaining increasing international recognition. Centred on principles of equality, solidarity and human dignity, social justice aims to link social theory with social action and change. However, while social justice as an idea is gaining momentum, what it actually means and how it can be applied is often left largely unexplored and undefined. In this course, students will be introduced to the study of social justice. Engaging with diverse meanings and definitions, students will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of key concepts and theories of social justice. Presented in relation to some of the most important social justice debates today, the course will equip students to apply these concepts and theories to a range of subject areas and social issues.

    SOJS1120 Living Human Rights
    This course introduces students to the concept of universal human rights. Students will learn about the contested nature of human rights, exploring different perspectives and examining the historical context that has shaped human rights policies and instruments today. Students will be introduced to key areas of human rights, exploring these through examples and case studies, in order to understand how they relate to their everyday lives.

    SOJS2000 Understanding Social Change
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course explores the different ways in which the goal of social justice has been pursued in Australia, looking at key social movements that have influenced fundamental shifts in Australian values and society. The course traverses the battlegrounds of Australian history, from issues such as the contest for living wages to indigenous recognition and peace movements, identifying the actors and strategies that have featured in the struggle for justice. Centring on the role of civil society, the course investigates the various ways in which political power can be accessed by communities and people – both inside and outside formal organisations, institutions and mass media- and analyses the critical moments that have provided the conditions for just social change. Contextualising social movement history through an exploration of social movement theory and participatory democratic theory, key drivers for the success of social movements are considered

    SOJS2040 Social Justice and the Natural World
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    In an era of globalisation and mass production, the connection between social justice for people and the natural world is becoming increasingly apparent. Environmental issues are linked to some of the most pressing social justice concerns of our time: the vulnerability of peoples and communities, international relations of production and power, human and economic development, human rights and human dignity, and conflict and peace building in different parts of the world. As the impact of environmental degradation begins to emerge, debates over human responsibilities towards our natural habitat and all the creatures of the earth intensify. This course explores the significance of environmental concerns for social justice today. Students will be introduced to an inter-disciplinary range of theories and frameworks aimed at understanding the relationship between human beings, animals and the environment. Students will apply these to contemporary issues, including themes such as animal welfare and testing, water rights and access, the pursuit of natural commodities (e.g. diamonds, oil) and social conflict, the status of the environment under international law, food production and development, and bioethics.

    SOJS2120 Living Human Rights
    This course introduces students to the concept of universal human rights. Students will learn about the contested nature of human rights, exploring different perspectives and examining the historical context that has shaped human rights policies and instruments today. Students will be introduced to key areas of human rights, exploring these through examples and case studies, in order to understand how they relate to their everyday lives.

    SOJS3000 Global Development and Justice
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 150 credits of prior learning
    This course examines the historical emergence of global poverty and the development industry, exploring the underlying global factors that have shaped the tremendous inequality between “developed” and “underdeveloped” nations. The course challenges students to think differently about “development” and to apply these insights to issues of poverty, global inequality and global justice. Developing critical and ethical thinking in relation to global development, students learn from and reflect on the ways in which key theoretical debates in the field might impact on real-world practice.

    SOJS3008 Social Justice Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of SOJS courses
    Social Justice Internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students will, ideally, be exposed to a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice and the ethical delivery of self.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    SOJS3160 Peace and Conflict Studies
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course equips students with theoretical and conceptual tools to help them understand the causes of, and solutions for, violent conflict. Theories and concepts of peace and violence are explored, and applied to broad and context-specific case studies. Multidisciplinary in nature, Peace and Conflict Studies draws on History, Politics and International Relations, Sociology, Psychology and Gender Studies to analyse the causes of violent conflict.  This course is founded on a moral imperative to pursue non-violence and a just peace. Students are encouraged to consider strategies for effective peacebuilding at a variety of levels, from the interpersonal to the geopolitical.

    SOJS3170 Social Justice, Service-Learning and Community Engagement 
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course utilises service learning to develop better communities and to enable students to understand social justice issues. Through completion of a community placement, students develop critical skills such as leadership through service, ethical decision-making, and self-reflection. The experiences in the placement are viewed through a social justice lens, including Catholic Social teaching, active citizenship, and community participation. During this course, students discuss issues in their local community and what their role is in them.

    SOJS3200 Activating Social Change
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 50 units of credit of SOJS prior learning
    This is a practical course that provides students with communication tools used in engaging communities in social change. Students will have the opportunity to develop relational skills to enhance capacities for active citizenship, with a focus on the foundational social justice concepts which underpin successful community-based political participation. This will include the frameworks and strategies involved in grassroots community organising. Students will also develop reflective skills necessary for practising self-management in community and advocacy contexts. Rather than learning a static set of campaigning rules, the focus will be on adaptability, experimentation and reflective practice.

    SOJS3220 Service Learning International
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of courses
    This course applies the concept of service learning to an overseas, international context. Emphasis will be placed on social justice along with cross-cultural understanding and awareness. The academic learning in the course focuses on key issues such as human rights, globalisation, and community development. The experiential component explores ethical decision-making, leadership development, and balancing the needs of the individual, the community and the natural environment.

  • Sociology

    SOCI1000 Self and Society
    This course introduces students to the discipline of sociology, which involves systematic study of the relationship between self and society. It shows how social differences such as gender, class, race and ethnicity shape our actions and interactions. It also examines how social institutions, including the family, sport, education, health and criminal justice systems and media and popular culture contribute to identity, social change and stability. Students will be introduced to a range of key concepts and theories that will help them to interpret everyday social life in general and Australian society in particular. This course will be useful to students seeking to work in a range of professions concerned with how the individual is shaped by their social context including advertising, applied psychology, counselling, education, film, journalism, law and politics.

    SOCI1020 Social Problems and Solutions
    The main aim of this course is to get students to think critically about the social problems that are prevalent in their respective societies. The course will provide students with sociological tools to understand not just the problems themselves but also the politics of social problems debates. The course will encourage students to read between the lines of the explanations and remedies currently offered as truth by journalists and politicians. Students will be encouraged also to question their own perceptions and beliefs about social problems as well as those portrayed in the larger culture around them. This course is an essential course for any sociological program in that it is meant to provide the student with information and conceptual tools beyond an introduction to the discipline.

    SOCI2020 Sociology of Childhood
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Through lectures, course readings and discussions, we will cover the social world that our society provides for children, and the social world that children create for themselves. We will consider how the meaning of childhood changes over time, place, and social context. We will see that there is no singular definition of childhood, but instead many different ways of experiencing youth and adolescence in Western societies and in the Global South. Children are socialized in a variety of social institutions (e.g., schools, family, work); the course should help us understand the effects these institutions have on children's lives and futures. Sexism, racism, classism, and abuse also affect children, and this course will explore these and other negative childhood experiences. Children are not just receptors for socialization; the course will also address how their lives and experiences shape society now and for the future. Typically children are only studied as victims or perpetrators of social problems, but in this course we will consider children in many additional contexts. We will also pay special attention to why the relationship between youth and popular culture is routinely viewed as problematic, how children are discussed within the popular press, and examine how public policy (Children Rights included) and laws are formulated in response to this and other issues. This course may be especially beneficial to current or future policy makers, teachers and counselors working with children, historians, family lawyers and advocates and parents alike.

    SOCI2030 Health, Medicine and Society
    This course introduces students to a sociological approach to the health and illness patterns in Australia.  It will introduce historical, social and cultural dimensions of health care delivery,  health and illness, including  patterns of social inequality which effect vulnerable groups in society.  Students develop an understanding of and sensibility to the many factors that can impact on the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities in Australian society today.

    SOCI2040 Understanding Gender
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Through a close examination of key themes and concepts in gender studies, Understanding Gender will offer students the skills needed to apply a gender lens to a variety of social issues. The course explores the complex relationship between sex and gender, the processes by which women and men become gendered in various contexts, and the ways in which gender identities and experiences intersect with other social forces such as race, class and disability. Critically reflecting on both theory and their own experiences of becoming gendered, students will learn how to apply a gender lens to areas such as work, the media and the body, analysing the ways in which masculinities and femininities are constructed as an organising social force within society. The course provides students with central analytical tools to apply gender analysis to a range of subject areas, and is relevant to students from disciplines such as sociology, history, communications and literature.

    SOCI3000 Ableism, (Dis)ability and Society
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines the social construction of ‘ableism’ and its significance in shaping experiences of disability within society by identifying the social and psychological processes that facilitate its development. Contemporary social theories understand ableism as the product of social and cultural processes of normalization and privilege to be challenged (rather than focusing on disability as an individual pathology to be treated). Students investigate how these perspectives have influenced developments in advocacy and empowerment; media and technology; education; policy and community development; human rights law; and service delivery for people with disabilities. Understanding the power differentials that are created by the construction of categories of human functioning and the discourses that underpin these provide students with the mechanisms to challenge and resist such construction in their professional practice.

    SOCI3008 Sociology Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of SOCI prior learning
    Sociology internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within the industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    SOCI3010 Sociological Theory and Method
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of SOCI prior learning
    Deleuze and Foucault's conception of 'theory as toolbox' suggest that abstract sociological ideas can and do help us grapple with concrete social issues. In this course of study, we will examine the writings of key classical and contemporary figures within the field of sociology with a focus on their broad social impact as well as their contribution to the discipline. It focuses, in particular, on how different sociological theories have been shaped by their engagement with social context. The values, assumptions and contested meanings contained within theoretical debates in sociology are explored and tested. Topics considered include: the emergence of sociology as a distinct discipline; modern society, industrialisation and urbanisation; everyday life; challenges to classical sociology; post-modern society, individualisation and globalisation.

    SOCI3060 Social and Public Policy
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course is designed to familiarise students with the theories, models and processes of public and social policymaking.  It is intended to provide an understanding of the role of the public sector, its management and the ways in which policy is devised, implemented and evaluated.  The course also examines some key policy areas.

    On completion of this course, students will be able to:

    1. Recognise the functions of the State;
    2. Analyse the literature on the debates about the functions of the State;
    3. Apply theoretical models to the policy process, politically and sociologically;
    4. Examine the processes of the policy process, politically and sociologically;
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of the scope and limitations of policy process;
    6. Relate contemporary events to the process of public policy development in Australia.

    SOCI3120 Genocide
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    Apologists for western civilisation, such as Francis Fukuyama and Marvin Perry, suggest that the modern West is perhaps the pinnacle of human achievement in human culture and political liberty.  Edwin Locke goes so far as to suggest that the ‘greatness of the West is not an “ethnocentric” prejudice; it is an objective fact’.  Yet in the last hundred years alone, western societies have repeatedly engaged in war, ideological extremism and genocide.  The deliberate physical and cultural destruction to which millions of peoples in the West and in the developing world have been subjected suggests that the triumph of the twentieth century is a hollow one indeed. This course will provide students with an opportunity to examine the sensitive issue of genocide in the modern world.  It will make use of case studies to highlight political, historical and sociological perspectives on genocide, including the relationship between social, cultural and institutional power that contribute to the conditions and acts of genocide; the emergence in history of ‘genocide’ as an internationally recognised crime; and the political diversity and continuity between contexts where genocide has occurred. Finally, this critical and comparative approach will consider principles and policy options which may prevent the horror of genocide occurring in the future.

  • Spanish

    SPAN1000 Spanish for Beginners
    Spanish for Beginners covers the basic needs for speaking and writing in Spanish. The course is organised into topic-based modules that range from the learner’s immediate surroundings such as their personal information, family life, likes and dislikes to their interaction with the wider world in situations such as shopping or working. The emphasis is on being able to communicate in a private and social setting. It also teaches the basic skills in writing in Spanish.

    The course focuses on Spanish language skills and there is an emphasis on practising the speaking and writing skills throughout the course. Cultural information such as Spanish society, art, music, food and literature is also incorporated into the course.

    SPAN2000 Intermediate Spanish I
    Pre-requisite: SPAN100 Spanish for Beginners
    The Intermediate Spanish I language course teaches the student to describe, in simple terms, aspects of the past and of their surroundings, as well as being able to phrase questions related to immediate needs. The course teaches how to hold short conversations and briefly describe everyday life. Students also learn how to write basic correspondence and short stories. Language skills are integrated within each component of the course and practised throughout. Cultural information (such as food and society) is also incorporated into the course.

    SPAN2010 Intermediate Spanish II
    Pre-requisite: SPAN100 Spanish for Beginners
    The Intermediate Spanish II language course teaches the student complex grammatical structures in Spanish. The course teaches advanced vocabulary for social interactions and more formalised conversations with professionals. Students also learn how to express viewpoints on social and cultural issues. Students learn how to write basic correspondence. Language skills are integrated within each component of the course and practised throughout. Cultural information such as Spanish society, art, music, food and literature is also incorporated into the course.

  • Theatre Studies

    THTR1000 Theory and Practice of Acting 1
    The course is an introduction to acting skills, with a practical emphasis on movement skills and vocal technique. Through improvisation and scripted work, students learn how to communicate non-verbally with an audience and effectively employ the mechanics of voice. Students also practically discover and examine the work and theories of seminal practitioners such as Stanislavski and Brecht. This course includes instruction, discussion and practical exercises.

    THTR1050 Theory and Practice of Modern Theatre 
    This course examines popular dramatic forms from the mid-nineteenth century to the more contemporary plays of the early twentieth century. It examines realism and naturalism and the audience reaction to it and how social change and pressure lead on to Expressionism, Surrealism, Absurdism and Epic Theatre. There is a focus on critical analysis of texts as well as opportunities to further enhance understanding through performance. Teaching mode includes lectures, tutorials and performance workshops.

    THTR2000 Theory and Practice of Acting II
    Pre-requisite: THTR1000 Theory and Practice of Acting I
    This course extends the students understanding of contemporary performance theory and practice. There is continual emphasis on voice and movement as well as textual interpretation and improvisation. Students will research and explore various post-Stanislavsky approaches to acting and performance. A variety of texts will be introduced for individual and ensemble performance.

    THTR2010 Theatre Crafts
    Pre-requisite: THTR1000 Theory and Practice of Acting I OR THTR1050 Theory and Practice of Modern Theatre 
    This course offers students an opportunity to learn about the creative processes involved in staging a theatrical production. The course provides an overview of design processes, stagecraft techniques and production duties. Students will have the opportunity to focus on one or more design elements such as script analysis, set design, sound and lighting, stage management, costumes and properties, marketing and publicity.

    THTR3008 Theatre Studies Internship
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of THTR courses
    Theatre Studies internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within industry as part of their degree programs.  Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and private industry, in which the critical analysis, writing and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce.  Internship students need to consider a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice.  Students may be required to complete a research project or similar work as part of their placement, and will be required to complete a report for the host organisation and the University at the completion of their internship.  This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    THTR3050 Theatre for Social Change
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course will explore the role that theatre with a conscious social perspective has played in the history of world theatre, and the different ways theatre has been used to give expression to disempowered voices in society. Through readings, research and discussion, film/video documentaries and live performances, students will develop their knowledge of contemporary theatre practice and theory in order to understand the dynamic relationship between theatre and society and how theatre and performance can be used as an agent for social criticism and/or change.

    THTR3060 Australian Theatre
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100 units of credit of prior learning
    This course examines some of the greatest examples of Australian theatre from the mid‐nineteenth century to the present day. Students explore the dramatic styles employed by Australian playwrights and the power of theatre in Australian literary and popular culture, and may also consider how they compare to the creative works of Australian cinema and television.  Students also examine how Australian plays express a variety of important themes, in what fashion they might be an expression of history and culture, and how they reflect our society.

    THTR3090 Fundamentals of Directing 
    Pre-requisite: THTR2000 Theory and Practice of Acting II
    This course examines the art of directing for the stage through theoretical discussion, text analysis, research and scene work. Students engage in a practical exploration of theatrical composition focusing on how one constructs meaning in theatre. The work of seminal theatre directors and contemporary methodologies are examined. Students adopt a collaborative approach to develop scenes from inspirations such as poetry, art and music, and stage scenes from both realistic and non-realistic theatre traditions. A showcase of student work may be presented at the end of the semester.

    THTR3110 Text-Based Production Workshop
    Pre-requisite: THTR2000  Theory and Practice of Acting II
    Through this course students will explore the way meaning is communicated in the theatre in order to understand how play scripts can only be fully appreciated through performance.  Students will be involved in staging a fully rehearsed theatre production for public performance.  Each student will be assigned an on-stage role, and/or will be required to work on one or more specific aspects of staging the production. These production duties may include dramaturgy, stage management, lighting and sound design, props, costumes, marketing and publicity.

    THTR3120 Devised Production Workshop
    Pre-requisite: THTR2000  Theory and Practice of Acting II
    This course will examine in a practical way the various processes involved in "devising" for contemporary theatre performance. Students will study the different approaches to devised theatre by examining contemporary performance practice and the work of seminal theatre-makers. In devising their own ensemble presentation, students will research, discuss, plan, construct and workshop the piece as a group. Roles can be defined such as director, deviser and/or performer. Group work is essential to recognise the collaborative nature of the theatre experience.

    THTR3410 Drama in the Age of Shakespeare
    Pre-requisite: Completion of 100cp of prior learning
    This course involves a close study of a significant number of Shakespeare’s histories, tragedies and comedies. These plays are considered in the context of the variety of Elizabethan and Jacobean stages for which they were written, and on which they were performed. The plays of Shakespeare are studied in the context of the comedies and tragedies of some of his contemporaries.

  • Theology

    THEO1000 Foundations of Catholic Theology
    See details

    THEO1110 Introduction to the Old Testament
    See details

    THEO1210 Introduction to New Testament
    See details

    THEO1520 Introduction to Christian Spirituality
    See details

    THEO2130 Psalms & Wisdom
    See details

    THEO2210 Writings of Paul: Freedom in the Spirit
    See details

    THEO2220 Synoptic Gospels
    See details

    THEO2250 Introduction to Sacramental Theology
    See details

    THEO2310 Early Church History
    See details

    THEO2470 Foundations of Moral Theology
    See details

    THEO3010 Scripture and Church
    See details

    THEO3140 The Prophets: Critics of Status Quo
    See details

    THEO3410 Ecclesiology/Mariology
    See details

    THEO3420 Eucharist
    See details

    THEO3540 Trinity
    See details

  • Writing

    WRIT2000 Narrative Writing
    This course develops the narrative writing skills of students, with an emphasis on language and form in fictional works. Narrative concepts studied include voice and point of view, story and scene, plot, structure, character development and dialogue. Craft skills are developed through writing exercises, language analysis, and a sustained work of fiction. Students learn drafting and editing skills by analysing their own work in comparison to others.

    WRIT3000 Writing for Performance
    Pre-requisite: WRIT2000 Narrative Writing, THTR1050 Theory & Practice of Modern Theatre, COMM2020 Screenwriting
    This course introduces theory and practice of writing for live performance, particularly the stage. Students are exposed to a broad range of performance writing practices, and dramaturgy techniques and theories of performance. They will also engage in practical exercises to develop techniques for generating and structuring their own material. Various forms of writing will be studied including narrative-driven plot, dream writing, verbatim, poetic metaphor, and adaptation. The course will analyse the relationship between the playwright and his/her cultural context. Students will be encouraged to develop a sense of theatre as a tool for social critique and activism.

    WRIT3010 Writing Project
    Pre-requisite: WRIT2000 Narrative Writing
    In this capstone course, students will initiate, plan and execute a substantial writing project in their chosen genre. Students will analyse craft, technique and narrative concepts, make productive links between their work and other published works in the creative field, and interrogated their work in comparison to others. Structured writing workshops enable students to critically reflect on the relationship between literary and technical concepts and their own writing project.

    WRIT6000 Reading and Writing
    This course provides students with the critical insights and technical vocabularies they need to produce creative and professional writing, with a focus on the relationship between form, style, language and genre. Students critically analyse texts across genres and media platforms in order to identify the specific techniques used to create written works appropriate for different professional and creative purposes. Students produce and evaluate their own work in a nominated genre.

    WRIT6001 Freelance Writing
    In this course, students develop a portfolio of journalistic work for print and digital media that articulates a professional identity for a freelance writer. Students analyse the specific techniques used to create writing appropriate for various audiences, publications and markets. Students apply their writing and reporting skills in order to produce distinctive work across fields such as arts, science, food and travel writing.

    WRIT6002 Corporate Writing
    This course explores the nature of professional writing. Students learn methodologies to plan and create written content. They analyse structural principles and produce written content in diverse genres, styles and narrative forms such as websites, brochures, social media, speeches and corporate reports. This course will be of interest to students seeking to develop professional writing skills necessary to communicate at a high level in public and private sector organisations.

    WRIT6003 Fiction Writing
    This is an advanced course for students interested in extending their critical and creative skills in fiction writing. Students plan and produce work for an inter-linked short story collection or write the opening sections of a novel or novella. The complicated process of envisioning and planning extended book-length works is explored. Students critically analyse published work and evaluate their own work-in-progress.

    WRIT6004 Creative Nonfiction Writing
    This course examines how creative non-fiction uses literary techniques to produce factually accurate narratives It includes an analysis of narrative and non-narrative literary forms such as biography, history, memoir, and the personal essay. Students produce an extended piece of writing in their chosen non-fiction genre.

    WRIT6005 Playwriting
    This course explores writing for the stage with an emphasis on the relationship between the playwright and their cultural context. Students create an original script that may include new works or adaptations of existing texts, individual or collaborative works, or writing from devised work with actors. Projects are supported by the analysis of dramaturgical principles based on traditional linear play structures, as well as new play forms that draw on post-dramatic concepts. Students analyse written play-texts, live theatre performances and their own works-in-progress.

    WRIT6006 Advanced Screenwriting
    This course focusses on the creation of an original script for the screen. Students develop, through practical workshops, their screenwriting skills across film, TV and new media forms. Students create a screen project comprising a concept and script materials for either: a short film, a feature-length film, a TV pilot, or a new media project such as a web series.

    WRIT6007 Editing and Publishing in the Digital Age
    This course gives students a practical understanding of the publishing process from editorial project management through to the production and marketing of print and digital works. Students learn and practice the techniques of editing, including structural editing and project evaluation, copy-editing and proofreading. Students analyse new publishing trends and technologies, including digital distribution and print on demand technologies. The course is designed to prepare students to work in a twenty-first century publishing environment.