Course descriptions

  • Philosophy courses

    CORE1001 Logos I
    The three courses which constitute the Logos Programme will each provide students with 8 modules of study in the disciplines of Philosophy (including Philosophical Ethics) and Theology, four of which will be compulsory.     
    The compulsory modules will introduce students to study:

      In Philosophy as a search for fundamental truths, a quest for understanding the meaning and significance of concepts and rationale thought and an exploration of the meaning of life for human beings.
    • In Philosophical Ethics as an exploration of what we value as ‘good’ or ‘bad’; what we regard as ‘virtuous’ or ‘vicious’ in terms of behaviour or character; and what we define by rule as ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ to allow for the protection of individuals and the well-being of the community.
    • In Theology as a structured and principled inquiry into the foundations of the Christian faith, its meaning and fundamental coherence, and implications for the life of the world. Students will be introduced to major biblical narratives and significant moments in church history.

    CORE1002 Logos II
    The three courses which constitute the Logos Programme will each provide students with 8 modules of study in the disciplines of Philosophy (including Philosophical Ethics) and Theology, four of which will be compulsory.     
    The compulsory modules will introduce students to study:

    • In Philosophy as a search for fundamental truths, a quest for understanding the meaning and significance of concepts and rationale thought and an exploration of the meaning of life for human beings.
    • In Philosophical Ethics as an exploration of what we value as ‘good’ or ‘bad’; what we regard as ‘virtuous’ or ‘vicious’ in terms of behaviour or character; and what we define by rule as ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ to allow for the protection of individuals and the well-being of the community.
    • In Theology as a structured and principled inquiry into the foundations of the Christian faith, its meaning and fundamental coherence, and implications for the life of the world. Students will be introduced to major biblical narratives and significant moments in church history.

    CORE1003 Logos III
    The three courses which constitute the Logos Programme will each provide students with 8 modules of study in the disciplines of Philosophy (including Philosophical Ethics) and Theology, four of which will be compulsory.
    The compulsory modules will introduce students to study:

    • In Philosophy as a search for fundamental truths, a quest for understanding the meaning and significance of concepts and rationale thought and an exploration of the meaning of life for human beings.
    • In Philosophical Ethics as an exploration of what we value as ‘good’ or ‘bad’; what we regard as ‘virtuous’ or ‘vicious’ in terms of behaviour or character; and what we define by rule as ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ to allow for the protection of individuals and the well-being of the community.
    • In Theology as a structured and principled inquiry into the foundations of the Christian faith, its meaning and fundamental coherence, and implications for the life of the world. Students will be introduced to major biblical narratives and significant moments in church history.

    PHIL1020 The Method and Basic Problems of Philosophy
    This course will introduce students to the basic method and problems of philosophy through an investigation of the ways in which philosophers throughout history have sought wisdom. The course will focus on the key discipline areas of philosophy such as metaphysics, logic, epistemology, philosophical anthropology, ethics, and aesthetics. Within these discussions the course will also draw attention to the key problems that have defined the tradition of philosophy.  The course will also place some emphasis on the philosophy of St Thomas Aquinas in recognition of the prominence of Thomism in the tradition of Catholic philosophy.

    PHIL1030 Critical Thinking
    This course is a practical introduction to critical thinking and reasoning. Students will learn to critically analyse and evaluate arguments as well as to construct their own good arguments. Students will also learn how to identify the various kinds of arguments, including deductive and inductive arguments. Skills will be taught such as detection of fallacies and poor reasoning in academic contexts.  Examples found in the media, advertising and politics will also be studied. This course will enhance a student’s ability to reason both within their academic life but also in their chosen vocation outside the university setting.

    PHIL2010 Introduction to Formal Logic
    This course is a comprehensive introduction to the concepts and techniques used in the study of formal logic. Students will learn to translate arguments from ordinary language into symbolic form and use various techniques to analyse these argument forms to test their validity. These techniques include truth tables, truth trees, and natural deduction methods to judge formal validity.  The course covers both propositional and predicate logic. Students will also study the philosophy of logic. This will give students an appreciation of the difference between using logic as a tool to examine arguments versus the nature of logic itself.

    PHIL2060 The Philosophy of Science
    This course explains the central issues in the philosophy of science.  Science is seen by many to be the best way of forming knowledge of the world around us. The philosophy of science scrutinizes this claim.  Key topics involve the study of scientific reasoning, induction and falsification; the nature of observation, explanation and prediction. The course covers whether scientific progress and theory change are rational or irrational; and the debate between realists and anti-realists about scientific knowledge.  The relationship between science and religion will be considered from the perspective of the Catholic philosophical tradition. No background in science is assumed.

    PHIL2070 The Philosophy of Language
    The course examines the relationship between speakers, words and the world. It concerns theories of truth and meaning. It asks questions such as: “How do words refer to things in the world?”; “What is it that makes a sentence mean something: is it the user or the words themselves?” Philosophy of Language is closely connected to twentieth-century analytic philosophy which holds that a proper study of linguistic analysis informs and aids us in giving solutions to deep philosophical problems.

    PHIL2100 History of Philosophy: Ancient 
    This course examines the philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome, especially in terms of their impact on the formation of Western thought and society. The Course covers major thinkers from the Pre-Socratics through to Augustine, emphasising the influence of Plato and Aristotle on Hellenic and Roman thought. Key areas of philosophy covered include epistemology, logic, metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy.

    PHIL2110 History of Philosophy: Medieval
    This course examines philosophers of the Middle-Ages, especially in terms of their impact on the development of Western Christianity. It traces the course of philosophy from the sixth to the sixteenth Century (Renaissance). Central themes include the relationship between faith and reason, the emergence of natural theology, and medieval philosophical understandings of metaphysics, logic, ethics and politics.

    PHIL2130 History of Philosophy: Modern
    This course begins with an analysis of the various forces at work in the transition from the medieval world view to the renaissance or “modernity.” The Course then explores the rise of science and technology, and the impact of the modern approach on Western thought and culture. The course also explores debates between rationalists and empiricists, particularly in connection with the philosophical disciplines of metaphysics and epistemology.

    PHIL2140 History of Philosophy: Contemporary
    This course explores the “revolution” in philosophy initiated by Kant before examining various strands of thinking that emerged after him, in both the Anglo-American and Continental traditions. These strands may include Logical Positivism, Analytic Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, Feminism, Phenomenology and Existentialism, and Postmodernism.

    PHIL3000 Aquinas: Analytic and Phenomenological approaches 
    This course will introduce students of philosophy to contemporary approaches to St. Thomas Aquinas and to the place of Thomistic philosophy within the Catholic tradition. Students will be introduced to Aquinas’ philosophy. The course will also introduce students to the basic methods and approaches of analytic and continental philosophy. The course will focus on providing detailed and in-depth analyses of analytic and continental readings of key topics and arguments in the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. A general aim of this course is to ask whether analytic and continental philosophy can be compatible. The course will also aim to shed light on the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas and his continuing importance in contemporary philosophical debates.

    PHIL3010 Business Ethics
    This course is designed, firstly, to give participants a philosophical framework behind the academic discipline of ethics and, secondly, to show how that framework is applied to Business and Professional ethics. This course will introduce you to several theories of ethics and examine the way these theories are applied to business and professional life. You will also be introduced to a series of models commonly used in public and private sector management decision-making.

    PHIL3030 An Introduction to Metaphysics
    This course will introduce students to the tradition of metaphysics, tracing its path of development from Pre-Socratic philosophy through to its ‘death’ in contemporary philosophy. Particular emphasis will be placed on the question of the nature of metaphysics as ‘first philosophy’. The course will also introduce students to the basic features of metaphysics such as: first principles, God, and being.

    PHIL3040 Metaphysics, Being, and God
    This course will address the key approaches, debates, and problems which have defined metaphysics throughout its history. The course will consider the main approaches to metaphysical thinking, including: realism, nominalism, and moderate realism. The course will also cover the defining problems of metaphysical thinking, such as: God, being, universals and particulars, causation, space and time, categories, identity and difference, necessity, possibility, and contingency. Students will develop an advanced knowledge and understanding of philosophical concepts and will also develop their skills in philosophical reasoning.

    PHIL3050 Aesthetics: The Philosophy of Art
    Aesthetics: The Philosophy of Art is a course that analyses philosophical issues surrounding the concept of art and entertainment. The discipline of Aesthetics includes comparative analysis of sculpture, painting, film, novels, and music. The study of Aesthetics examines what it is that people appreciate when they enjoy a piece of artwork by identifying characteristics that artworks hold in common. The course provides an overview of the philosophy of aesthetics, it explores various theories of Aesthetics, and it evaluates the moral and intrinsic value of aesthetic experience. Prerequisite: .at least one year of full-time tertiary education.

    PHIL3060 Faith and Reason
    This course will address the philosophical questions of the nature of faith and of reason, and the relationship between faith and reason. The course will cover major debates about this relationship throughout the history of philosophy. Particular attention will be paid to the arguments of St. Thomas Aquinas and Pope John Paul II about the relation between faith and reason.

    PHIL3070 Philosophy of Education
    The philosophy of education, an important discipline in applied philosophy, investigates key problems, concepts, and debates regarding educational theory and practice. This course will address philosophical questions on education such as: What is education? Why do humans require education? What are the purposes and aims of education? How do we educate humans? The course will also engage in philosophical investigation of key concepts, problems, and arguments in educational theory and practice, including reason, freedom, moral values, knowledge, citizenship, pedagogy, curriculum, and teaching and learning. This course will cover traditional and contemporary philosophical debates associated with educational theory and practice.

    PHIL3080 Natural Law
    This course traces the tradition of Natural Law, from classical philosophy, through the medieval period and especially the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, to modern and contemporary arguments. The debate between Natural Law and Legal Positivism is highlighted. The relationship between morality and metaphysics is also examined, especially in terms of there being a continuity that is possible between descriptive and moral propositions. The course examines questions such as: Is morality written into our nature? Are there “unjust laws”? To what extent should a society permit conscientious objection to unjust laws?

    PHIL3090 Moral Philosophy 
    Moral Philosophy is the study of how humans approach, understand, justify, and engage moral principles and theories. The course firstly explores metaethical issues of subjectivism, relativism, and divine command. Secondly, it explores normative theories of utilitarianism, deontology, natural law, and virtue ethics.

    PHIL3150 Philosophy of Love and Friendship
    This course examines what some of the great thinkers throughout history have had to say about love and friendship. Emphasis is placed on different types of love and different conceptions of its meaning in human life. The ways in which love has been understood and changed throughout history is noted, and the portrayal of love in music, mythology and literature, and film is considered. The nature of human relationships, including both the edification which they can bring, and challenges which they can present, is the focus of the course.

    PHIL3210 Philosophy of the Human Person
    This course examines different theories of human nature, the differences between human persons and animals, and human persons and machines. Other themes include the basic drives or instincts behind human behaviour, the soul, the human capacity for evil, self-identity, mind/body, depersonalisation, personal relationships, and freedom.

    PHIL3300 Epistemology: Ways of Knowing
    Epistemology is the branch of philosophy concerned with knowledge. As such it asks questions about reason, truth and certainty. Epistemology delves into different conceptions of the very notion of “truth”, and how it can be derived. What are our best “ways of knowing”? Are there such things as “facts” or is everything interpretive? Can knowledge be clearly distinguished from belief? The course also examines classical theories on knowledge such as rationalism and empiricism, and the role of language in coming to knowledge and belief.

    PHIL3310 Cosmology and Philosophy of Science
    This course explains central issues in the philosophy of science. Science is seen by many to be the best way of forming knowledge of the world around us. The philosophy of science scrutinizes this claim. Key topics involve the study of scientific reasoning, induction and falsification; the nature of observation, explanation and prediction. The course uses the study of cosmology to illustrate the changes associated with naturalist and supernaturalist explanations of the world. No background in science is assumed.

    PHIL3410 Political Philosophy
    This course examines the influence of philosophers and their philosophies on current day social organization. Prominent themes include democracy and other political systems, power, private property, freedom, equality, human nature, civil disobedience, liberalism, feminism, social control, and the relationship between politics and religion.

    PHIL3510 Metaphysics: Theories of Being and Existence
    This course concentrates on the area of Metaphysics called Ontology – the study of what is meant by “being” or “existence”. What does it mean to say that something truly exists or is “real”, as opposed to it not existing or being “unreal”? The course looks at traditional ontological problems and defences of Metaphysics throughout different periods of history. It also includes a study of the various attacks on Metaphysics throughout history, though particularly in contemporary philosophy.

    PHIL3520 Philosophy of Religion
    This course examines different conceptions of the proper relationship between philosophy and theology. It considers the place of rationalism and irrationalism in religious thought, and allied to this, the relationship between faith and reason. It also considers the merit of argument from personal religious experience and other arguments that justify religious belief. In particular, the course investigates the relationship between metaphysics, religion, and natural reason.

    PHIL3550 Myth and Meaning
    Consistent with the vast interest that has developed in philosophy of language and philosophical hermeneutics in the past century, this course seeks to recognise the vital role of story or narrative in human experience, based on a critical understanding of the role of imagination in human development. The course seeks to evaluate current theory and research as to the role of story, legend and myth in personal and cultural identification; seeking to integrate themes from Literature, Psychology, and Comparative Religion. It is argued that the nature and purpose of myth, allied with a study of dreams and symbols, can lead to a sharpened appreciation of the impact of story on personal development and socialisation.

    PHIL3710 Logical and Critical Thinking
    This course concerns concepts and techniques used in the study of formal logic. This involves various techniques including truth tables, truth trees, and natural deduction methods to judge formal validity. The course covers both propositional and predicate logic. The course also covers the philosophy of logic and the differentiation between using logic as a tool to examine arguments versus the nature of logic itself.

    PHIL3900 Directed Individual Study 
    Pre-requisite: Dean’s approval required
    This course will enable students to explore in detail a specific topic in philosophy. The topic can be chosen from any of the 4 discipline areas of philosophy: Foundations of philosophy, History of philosophy, Moral philosophy, and Philosophy of the human person. NB. There are no pre-requisites for this course. Approval from the Dean of the School of Philosophy and Theology is required to enroll in this course.

    PHIL3950 Special Topics in Philosophy and Ethics
    This course will enable students to explore in detail a specific topic in philosophy not covered in the published list courses offered by the School of Philosophy and Theology.

    PHIL6010 Business Ethics 
    This course will explore the role that ethics ought to play in business practice. In all societies, whether religious or secular, ethics is concerned with attempts by human beings to define what is good or bad or what is right or wrong. Ethics involves rules, principles or regulations that are codified by society to promote human well-being.

    PHIL6020 Ethical Issues in Professional Life
    This course will explore the relationship between moral philosophy and applied ethics in professional life. Further, we study such issues as the relevance of ethics to specialisation, power and privilege in the professions, performance assessment, codes of ethics institutional values and corporate ethical culture. Specialist seminar topics may include confidentiality, secrecy and truth-telling in counselling; professional and management responsibility and accountability; dealing with power and authority, conflict resolution, performance assessment & discipline.

    PHIL6050 Moral Philosophy 
    Moral Philosophy is the study of how humans approach, understand, justify, and engage moral principles and theories. The course firstly explores metaethical issues of subjectivism, relativism, and divine command. Secondly, it explores normative theories of utilitarianism, deontology, natural law, and virtue ethics.

    PHIL6051 Aesthetics: The Philosophy of Art 
    Aesthetics: The Philosophy of Art is a course that analyses philosophical issues surrounding the concept of Art and entertainment. The discipline of Aesthetics includes a comparative analysis of sculpture, painting, film, novels, and music. The study of Aesthetics examines what it is that people appreciate when they enjoy a piece of artwork by identifying characteristics that artworks hold in common. The course provides an overview of the philosophy of aesthetics, it explores various theories of aesthetics, and it evaluates the moral and intrinsic value of aesthetic experience. No prior knowledge is assumed.

    PHIL6080 Natural Law 
    This course traces the tradition of Natural Law, from classical philosophy, through the medieval period and especially the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, to modern and contemporary arguments. The debate between Natural Law and Legal Positivism is highlighted. The relationship between morality and metaphysics is also examined, especially in terms of there being a continuity that is possible between descriptive and moral propositions. The course examines questions such as: Is morality written into our nature? Are there “unjust laws”? To what extent should a society permit conscientious objection to unjust laws?

    PHIL6100 History of Philosophy: Ancient
    This course examines the philosophers of ancient Greece and Rome, especially in terms of their impact on the formation of Western thought and society. The Course covers major thinkers from the Pre-Socratics through to Augustine, emphasising the influence of Plato and Aristotle on Hellenic and Roman thought. Key areas of philosophy covered include epistemology, logic, metaphysics, ethics, and political philosophy.

    PHIL6110 History of Philosophy: Medieval 
    This course examines philosophers of the Middle-Ages, especially in terms of their impact on the development of Western Christianity. It traces the course of philosophy from the sixth to the sixteenth Century (Renaissance). Central themes include the relationship between faith and reason, the emergence of natural theology, and medieval philosophical understandings of metaphysics, logic, ethics and politics.

    PHIL6130 History of Philosophy: Modern
    This course begins with an analysis of the various forces at work in the transition from the medieval world view to the renaissance or “modernity.” The Course then explores the rise of science and technology, and the impact of the modern approach on Western thought and culture. The course also explores debates between rationalists and empiricists, particularly in connection with the philosophical disciplines of metaphysics and epistemology.

    PHIL6140 History of Philosophy: Contemporary 
    This Course explores the “revolution” in philosophy initiated by Kant before examining various strands of thinking that emerged after him, in both the Anglo-American and Continental traditions. These strands may include Logical Positivism, Analytic Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, Feminism, Phenomenology and Existentialism, and Postmodernism.

    PHIL6150 Philosophy of Love and Friendship
    This course examines what some of the great thinkers throughout history have had to say about love and friendship. Emphasis is placed on different types of love and different conceptions of its meaning in human life. The ways in which love has been understood and changed throughout history is noted, and the portrayal of love in music, mythology and literature, and film is considered. The nature of human relationships, including both the edification which they can bring, and challenges which they can present, is the focus of the course.

    PHIL6210 Philosophy of the Human Person
    This course examines different theories of human nature, the differences between human persons and animals, and human persons and machines. Other themes include the basic drives or instincts behind human behaviour, the soul, the human capacity for evil, self-identity, mind/body, depersonalisation, personal relationships, and freedom.

    PHIL6300 Epistemology: Ways of Knowing
    Epistemology is the branch of philosophy concerned with knowledge. As such it asks questions about reason, truth and certainty. Epistemology delves into different conceptions of the very notion of “truth”, and how it can be derived. What are our best “ways of knowing”? Are there such things as “facts” or is everything interpretive? Can knowledge be clearly distinguished from belief? The course also examines classical theories on knowledge such as rationalism and empiricism, and the role of language in coming to knowledge and belief.

    PHIL6310 Cosmology and Philosophy of Science
    This course explains central issues in the philosophy of science. Science is seen by many to be the best way of forming knowledge of the world around us. The philosophy of science scrutinizes this claim. Key topics involve the study of scientific reasoning, induction and falsification; the nature of observation, explanation and prediction. The course uses the study of cosmology to illustrate the changes associated with naturalist and supernaturalist explanations of the world. No background in science is assumed.

    PHIL6410 Political Philosophy
    This course examines the influence of philosophers and their philosophies on current day social organization. Prominent themes include democracy and other political systems, power, private property, freedom, equality, human nature, civil disobedience, liberalism, feminism, social control, and the relationship between politics and religion.

    PHIL6510 Metaphysics: Theories of Being and Existence
    This course concentrates on the area of Metaphysics called Ontology – the study of what is meant by “being” or “existence”. What does it mean to say that something truly exists or is “real”, as opposed to it not existing or being “unreal”? The course looks at traditional ontological problems and defences of Metaphysics throughout different periods of history. It also includes a study of the various attacks on Metaphysics throughout history, though particularly in contemporary philosophy.

    PHIL6520 Philosophy of Religion
    This course examines different conceptions of the proper relationship between philosophy and theology. It considers the place of rationalism and irrationalism in religious thought, and allied to this, the relationship between faith and reason. It also considers the merit of argument from personal religious experience and other arguments that justify religious belief. In particular, the course investigates the relationship between metaphysics, religion, and natural reason

    PHIL6550 Myth and Meaning
    Consistent with the vast interest that has developed in philosophy of language and philosophical hermeneutics in the past century, this course seeks to recognise the vital role of story or narrative in human experience, based on a critical understanding of the role of imagination in human development. The course seeks to evaluate current theory and research as to the role of story, legend and myth in personal and cultural identification; seeking to integrate themes from Literature, Psychology, and Comparative Religion. It is argued that the nature and purpose of myth, allied with a study of dreams and symbols, can lead to a sharpened appreciation of the impact of story on personal development and socialisation.

    PHIL6900 Directed Individual Study
    This course will enable students to explore in detail a specific topic in philosophy. The topic can be chosen from any of the 4 discipline areas of philosophy: Foundations of philosophy, History of philosophy, Moral philosophy, and Philosophy of the human person.
    Approval from the Dean of the School of Philosophy and Theology is required to enrol in this course.

    PHIL6950 Special Topics in Philosophy and Ethics
    This course will enable students to explore in detail a specific topic in philosophy not covered in the published list courses offered by the School of Philosophy and Theology.

    PHTH3000 Bioethics
    This course introduces the student to ethical issues in modern healthcare practice. It will assist the student to be sensitive to a range of bioethical dilemmas, to evaluate issues in the light of Catholic and secular principles and to develop skills of applying moral principles to practical issues that may arise in the student’s future practice. The course is designed to be of assistance to medical students, nursing students, students of philosophy and/or theology, and students with a general interest in bioethics.

    PHTH3001 Philosophy and Theology Internship
    Internships allow students to gain valuable practical and professional skills within communities and professions as part of their degree programs. Internships may take a student to such areas as Government, Non-Government Organisations and the Church, in which the critical thinking, communication, ethical, and research skills they have honed at University will be tested in the workforce. Internship students will, ideally, be exposed to a wide range of workplace issues, including professional practice and ethical issues inherent in professional life. This course is normally available to students in their final year of enrolment.

    PHTH6000 Bioethics
    This course introduces the student to ethical issues in modern healthcare practice. It will assist students to be sensitive to a range of bioethical dilemmas, to evaluate issues in the light of Catholic and secular principles, and to develop skills of applying moral theory to practical issues. The course is primarily designed for postgraduate students in health, and philosophy and theology students but it is also open to anyone with a general interest in bioethics.

    PHTH6001 Research Methods in Philosophy and Theology
    This course teaches research methods used in philosophy and theology. It includes instruction on conducting a literature research, on analytic enquiry and propositional essay writing, on exegetical research, on historical research, on biblical interpretation, and on systematic theology.

    PHTH6002 Reason and Revelation
    This Course begins with philosophical analysis and explanation of concepts of reason, reasoning, and believing and acting upon reasons. The Course then relates reason to revelation (Scripture and Tradition). The relation between the disciplines of philosophy and theology is considered. The philosophy and theology of the human person is introduced. Major ethical claims concerning goodness, moral principles, character and conscience are explained and compared, with input from both moral philosophy and moral theology - God is discussed, including Christian claims about Trinity, Christ and Sacraments. Finally, the good human life is explored in the context of human nature, society and the Church.

    PHTH6008 The Human Person in Catholic Thought
    The concept of the Human Person is central to understanding Catholic Thought. This course addresses contemporary challenges to understanding what it means to be human. It takes students through key philosophical and theological principles and concepts that have formed the Catholic understanding of what it means to be human. By engaging with philosophical texts, Scripture, and works of art and literature, it traces the development of Catholic teaching on the human person in the history of the Church. The course uses the methods of learning and teaching from the Catholic liberal arts tradition.

    PHTH6009 The Good Life in Catholic Thought
    The "Good Life" is central to understanding Catholic Thought. This course addresses what it means to lead a good life as a human person. It focuses on philosophical and theological developments of the theory of natural law and the meaning of virtue. Through engaging with philosophical texts, Scripture, and works of art and literature, it traces the development of principles for leading a good life throughout the history of the Church, with particular focus on what it means to follow Christ. The course uses the methods of learning and teaching of the Catholic liberal arts tradition.

    PHTH6010 Teaching What the Catholic Church Teaches
    This course is designed for those who are called upon daily to respond to social and moral issues. It selects and explores the Church’s responses, both prophetic and reflective, to controversial issues that touch upon what it means to be human and to lead a good life. It focuses on why the Church teaches what it teaches, particularly in Catholic Social Thought. Students will develop skills so that they can explain clearly what the Church teaches. It focuses on the perennial need for civil discourse in society.

    PHTH6011 Education in the Catholic Liberal Arts Tradition
    This course provides an overview of the development of different approaches to education in the Catholic liberal arts tradition. It includes considerations of Catholic sacraments and liturgy as ways of knowing God and one another. It examines in particular the principles and practices of biblical exegesis in the Catholic tradition, the method of Socratic dialogue and learning, the text-based method of shared inquiry, and the great books method of analysis. Those who take the course will learn how to teach using all of these methods. At the same time, they will become acquainted with key texts and ideas in the Catholic Thought.

    PHTH 6020 Pastoral Placement
    This course allows students to undertake a pastoral placement under professional supervision (18 hours).  The course also includes analysis of the philosophical and theological foundations of pastoral care (21 hours).  The pastoral placement is approved by the Post Graduate Coordinator in consultation with external and internal supervision providers.

  • Theology courses

    THEO1000 Foundations of Catholic Theology
    In order to explore the richness of Catholic Theology it is important to understand its basic foundations. This course will focus on these foundations such as faith, supernatural revelation, Scripture and Tradition, the importance of doctrine, and the role of the Magisterium. Furthermore, the importance in Catholic theology of the relationship between philosophical reasoning and faith will be addressed. An emphasis will also be placed on theology’s connection to prayer, liturgy, and sacred art. The course will look at the history of theology as well as address how theology relates to other academic disciplines. Students in this course should be able to articulate the particular nature of what theology is as well as to demonstrate its value as knowledge and as a service to the Church.

    THEO1020 Spirituality and the Challenges of Reconciliation
    This course is based on the principles of Catholic social teaching and focuses on the need to develop a spirituality that will enable people of different cultures and histories to live in harmony. The course proposes that the spirituality for the third millennium is a spirituality of reconciliation. This course provides an opportunity to study the meaning of reconciliation theologically; to look at situations nationally and globally where reconciliation is needed; and to reflect on the skills and strategies used by churches, organisations and individuals to bring about reconciliation in various conflict situations around the world will be provided in this course. Special emphasis will be placed on the Australian scene.

    THEO1110 Introduction to the Old Testament
    This course provides an introduction to the literature of the Old Testament. The Old Testament is a diverse literature and this course provides an overview to the content and themes in the Old Testament in its historical and cultural setting of the ancient Near East. Students will be introduced to methods and issues in the modern study of the Old Testament and to available extra-biblical resources.

    THEO1210 Introduction to the New Testament
    This course introduces students to the literature of the New Testament. It includes an overview of content and major themes from selected passages. The course also introduces the socio-economic, political, and wider religious setting of the writings and their relationship to the life and ministry of Jesus. The course offers students an opportunity to learn both the content of New Testament Study and its method, serving both as an introduction to the New Testament itself and as a foundation for further studies in the field.

    THEO1510 Liturgy: Work of God and Work of God's People
    This course begins with a foundational theological exploration of the self-revelation of God, whose relationship with us is called grace. The course demonstrates how this divine revelation co-relates with the human search for meaning through the personal and corporate expressions of identity, bonding and shared values, which we call ritual. Finally, the course practically applies the theological principles elaborated to a consideration of liturgical participation, its goals and purpose.

    THEO1520 Introduction to Christian Spirituality
    This course introduces students to the study of Christian, and in particular, to Catholic Spirituality. This course explores the theological foundations and biblical images of Christian spirituality, and introduces the lives, writings and spiritual practices of a number Saints and people of outstanding faith such as St. Augustine, St. Gregory of Nyssa, St. Ignatius of Loyola, St. John of the Cross, St. Therese of Lisieux and Gerard Manley Hopkins. The course also focuses upon pastoral dimensions of spirituality in relation to areas such as suffering and death, and pastoral care.

    THEO2001 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
    An introduction to exegetical method in Biblical Hebrew, this course will establish a basic understanding of the Hebrew Alphabet, the grammatical structure of Biblical Hebrew, a basic vocabulary and the basic tools of translation. Students will be introduced to various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate simple Old Testament passages.

    THEO2002 Introduction to New Testament Greek
    This course provides an introduction to exegetical method in Koiné Greek, this course will establish a basic understanding of the Greek Alphabet, the grammatical structure of Koiné Greek, a basic vocabulary and the basic tools of translation. Students will be introduced to various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate simple NT passages.

    THEO2003 Introduction to Latin
    An introduction to Latin, this course will establish a basic understanding of the grammatical structure of Latin, a basic vocabulary and the basic tools of translation. Students will be introduced to various lexical and grammatical aids and will be able to translate simple passages.

    THEO2020 Catholic Social Thought: An Introduction
    This course encourages students to analyse the social doctrines of the Church by engagement with major documents and the historical and political conditions when these documents written. The course includes foundational considerations (God's plan, church mission and social doctrine, human rights); basic principles (common good, subsidiarity, and solidarity); classic encyclicals; Catholic social thought pre and post-Vatican II; and social teaching of Pope John Paul II.

    THEO2130 Psalms and Wisdom
    The book of Psalms and the Wisdom Literature in the Old Testament contains expressions of the people of Israel’s faith and worship. This course examines these expressions from the perspective of form, theology, themes, traditions, and the quest for truth and meaning. Wisdom books are selected for detailed study.

    THEO2210 Writings of Paul: Freedom in the Spirit
    This course studies the life and work of Paul the Apostle, his writings and those of the “Pauline school,” including the Pastoral Epistles. It examines key texts in relation to the development of early Christianity and its message.

    THEO2220 Synoptic Gospels: Mark and Matthew
    This course analyses the Synoptic Gospels, their independence from and interdependence on each other, and their witness to the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. Topics covered are the birth and death narratives of Jesus and the early life of the Church.

    THEO2230 Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles
    This course involves a study of Luke’s gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. The course examines both the ministry of Jesus and the beginnings of the Christian community as described in the Acts of the Apostles.

    THEO2240 Scripture and Morality
    This course reflects on the changing role of Scripture in moral theology and examines how moral thinking developed in the early Christian Church. Having grounded Christian morality in the Beatitudes and the Great Commandment, this course explores the relationship between an ancient text, regarded by Christians as inspired and normative, and contemporary ethical issues.

    THEO2250 Introduction to Sacramental Theology
    This course involves the study of the sacraments and begins with the primacy of the theology of the Paschal Mystery. On the cultural level, the place of sign and symbol in ordinary life is developed to show the human encounter with the life of the Risen Christ in his Spirit comes about through the patterns of symbolic action we call ritual within the lived and living tradition of the Church. Beyond the treatment of the general principles of the sacramental life of the Church, each of the individual sacraments is studied in the categories of Christian Initiation, Sacraments of Reconciliation and Healing, Sacraments of Mission and Commitment. As well, the general area of the traditional use of created matter in the sacramentals and the role of Blessings are highlighted.

    THEO2310 Early Church History: The Story Begins
    This course involves a study of the life of the early Church, not simply as something significant in its own right, but also for the foundations it laid for the later development of Christianity. The course examines the way that the early Church related to the Jewish and Hellenistic traditions and it examines how the power of the Roman shaped the early Church. The course also explores the development of Christian understanding regarding the nature of God, the Holy Trinity, the relations between divinity and humanity in Christ, and of the importance of seeing God's purpose in the world.

    THEO2340 Modern Church History
    The French Revolution and the Enlightenment mark a turning point in the Churches’ relationship with European culture and political thought. This course reviews how the Missionary movement, fundamentalism and the revival in biblical, theological and liturgical studies influenced the Church's relationship with the modern world.

    THEO2350 Reformations: Churches in the 16th Century
    The contemporary religious landscape is still marked by the creative, yet destructive, upheavals experienced within the cultural, theological and devotional life of the sixteenth-century Church in Europe. This course examines that abiding inheritance and pays particular attention to the Eucharistic disputes of the Reformation period.

    THEO2400 Christology
    This course introduces students to the kinds of questions that arise concerning the person, life, work, and significance of Jesus Christ. The course considers answers offered in the Christian tradition and current Christological scholarship. The course covers the Jesus tradition in the New Testament, types of New Testament Christology, the question of the historical Jesus, controversies in the early church and at the time of the Reformation.

    THEO2410 Faith and Culture - Fundamental Theology
    This course focuses on sources of the Christian tradition, particularly on the nature and locus of revelation, the nature of faith, and the interrelationship between revelation and faith. The course covers the inseparability of the “God” question and human questions, the relationship between faith and reason, and the nature of revelation as this has been particularly codified in sacred Scripture.

    THEO2430 Anthropology: Human Being within the Mystery
    In the context of the contemporary world, this course seeks to develop an understanding of the biblical view of humanity as created and in a relationship to God, a relationship that is broken by sin/alienation and renewed through the person and work of Christ. It explores such issues as the creation of human beings in the image of God, nature and grace, the significance of Jesus Christ as the New Adam. It will also consider the mutual implications of a Christian anthropology and the findings of the human and social sciences as these bear upon such contemporary questions as humankind’s relationship to political life, to the environment, and the equality of the sexes.

    THEO2460 Eschatology: The Living Hope of Christians
    In its exploration of the Christian estimate of the “after-life,” this course explores the nature of Christian hope and the meaning of death for a Christian, the fact and mystery of resurrection and heaven, the understanding of hell’s eternity and of purgatory as an ecumenical problem, and the final destiny of the “Person-in-Cosmos.”

    THEO2470 Fundamental Moral Theology
    This course examines the meaning and structure of the Roman Catholic moral tradition. Themes studied include: history and development of moral theology, the Christian conscience and its formation, discipleship and sin, the magisterium and authority, use of Scripture in moral theology, natural law, the role of moral principles and norms in contemporary moral theology.

    THEO2480 Sacraments of Initiation
    This course studies the Sacraments of Initiation: Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist within the Catholic tradition. It considers the anthropological roots of ritual and examines the Jewish and Christian origins of the ritual practices in the contemporary church. Tracing the influence of historical development and their pastoral and theological consequences in different moments of the Church's life. The course shows how these impact upon the celebration of the Eucharist, Baptism, and Confirmation today.

    THEO2550 Pastoral Theology Foundations I
    This course examines the nature of pastoral care, its relationship to pastoral theology and the theological and psychological foundations of pastoral ministry. It looks at Jesus as a pastor, develop some working assumptions and suggests a suitable contemporary model of pastoral theology. The course explores the psychological role and theological significance of the emotions, especially the negative emotions, e.g. fear, guilt, shame, anger. There are also processes for developing self-awareness together with a method of theological reflection.

    THEO3001 Translating Biblical Hebrew
    Building on the course Introduction to Biblical Hebrew this course will explore exegetical method in Biblical Hebrew. The course will advance understanding of grammatical structure of Biblical Hebrew giving an expanded vocabulary and the tools of exegetical study of Biblical Hebrew. Students will be encouraged to employ various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate advanced Biblical Hebrew passages.

    THEO3002 Translating New Testament Greek
    Building on the course Introduction to New Testament Greek this course will explore advanced exegetical method in Koiné Greek. The course will advance understanding of grammatical structure of Koiné Greek, an expanded vocabulary and the tools of exegetical study of Koiné Greek. Students will be encouraged to employ various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate advanced NT passages.

    THEO3003 Translating Latin
    Building on the course Introduction to Latin, this course will advance understanding of grammatical structure of Latin, giving an expanded vocabulary and the study tools of Latin. Students will be encouraged to employ various lexical and grammatical aids and will be able to translate Classical and Ecclesial passages.

    THEO3010 Scripture and Church
    This course explores the foundations of Catholic Christian tradition from Old Testament concept of who God is and the New Testament revelation of Jesus: incarnate Son and Saviour. The course also examines faith communities that grew out of that experience.

    THEO3140 The Prophets: Critics of the Status Quo
    The prophetic literature in the Old Testament contains prosaic and poetic materials associated with Israel’s prophets. This course provides an overview of their literary features, themes, theological perspectives, history and growth, in their historical and cultural contexts. A more detailed study is then done of selected books by a major and a minor prophet.

    THEO3220 The Johannine Literature
    This course involves a study of the New Testament writings associated with the name of John, emphasising the background and theological witness to Jesus of the Fourth Gospel, and considering the ongoing development of the Johannine traditions and community in the Epistles of John.

    THEO3370 The Theology and Practice of the New Evangelisation
    This course introduces students to the theology and practice of evangelisation as it is understood in the Catholic Church. The course involves a survey of the theology and practice of evangelisation from biblical times up to the present age provides a backdrop for the study of the modern encyclicals on evangelisation, Evangelii Nuntiandi and Evangelii Gaudium, as well as other relevant Church documents. Students will examine the challenges posed by the missionary mandate over 2000 years of Christian history in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the Church’s theological and pastoral responses to these challenges.

    THEO3410 Ecclesiology/Mariology
    The formal study of the church begins with the Mission of Jesus sent by the Father for the life of the world and his proclamation of the Kingdom of God being near at hand. This course explores the growth of the early church as reflected in the Apostolic writings and the witness of the early centuries. It reflects on how the Church developed in its self-understanding throughout different historical periods. The formal declarations of Trent, Vatican I and II and the Catechism of the Catholic Church are closely studied along with the major documents of the Magisterium. This course also considers the role of Mary in light of the teaching found in Lumen Gentium as well as key Mariological doctrines.

    THEO3420 Eucharist I
    This course analyses the biblical origins together with the historical patterns and devotional forms of Eucharistic celebration as these developed in the tradition from the Last Supper to today. The study's focus is on the pastoral consequences for today inasmuch as “the Eucharist makes the Church and the Church makes the Eucharist.

    THEO3430 Sacraments of Healing and Reconciliation
    This course on sacraments of Reconciliation and Healing continues the series of four courses covering Sacramental Theology in Notre Dame's Theology programme. As the sequential flow implies, this course builds on principles based on the methods of theological reflection and theological sources, hence the prerequisite demand for Th 245. It would also help to have done Th 248 on Initiation and Th 341 on the mission of the Church itself. This course focuses on the healing process, whether personal or communal. The need of healing is explored in the light of today's world and its pressures, while insight is gained from the historical patterns whereby the Christian community has mediated healing and reconciliation in Christ. Through its concentration on present Church rituals and ministry, their theological basis and recommended pastoral manner of celebration, the course attempts to throw light on a number of contemporary theological concerns within church ministry. This course also has particular objectives for those training for priestly ministry in the Church. It will be allied with other programs with the goal of pastoral integration through insights from Moral Theology, Systematic Theology, Canon Law and Liturgy as outlines in the Rites of the Church for Healing and Reconciliation.

    THEO3440 Moral Theology II: Christian Moral Thinking
    This course builds on Moral Theology I to assist students to understand Christian ethics in relation to philosophical reflection, sacred scripture, and the teaching of the Church. This course examines proportionalism, deontology, virtue ethics, conversion, the moral life and spirituality, the role of the Magisterium, and the impact of the encyclical Veritatis Splendor.

    THEO3470 Sacraments in Catholic Tradition
    The course covers the building blocks and the theological developments that led to the seven Sacraments of the Catholic Tradition. It also covers the scriptural, historical, theological and liturgical principles of each of the seven Sacraments. Students require this understanding of the Sacraments to enable them to teach Sacraments and to prepare Sacramental celebrations at School level.

    THEO3540 Trinity
    In this course, students will examine the contemporary renewal of the theology of the Trinity. The basis of Trinitarian faith is to be found in the life of Christ. In talking about the Trinity we are talking about the Christian experience of God. When we say that we believe in God, we affirm God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. It will become apparent that the Trinity is not simply a philosophical concept of God, but emerges from God's self-revelation in the person of Jesus Christ. The course will involve reflection on the implications of Trinitarian theology for issues facing humankind at the beginning of the third millennium. The theology of the Trinity is studied in three stages: (1) Its biblical foundations, with particular emphasis on the paschal mystery of Christ; (2) Its development in the patristic period, which culminates in the Councils of Nicaea (325) and Constantinople I (381), and its development in medieval theology; and (3) The contemporary retrieval of the doctrine, especially the development of the social doctrine of the Trinity, where we trace the shift in thinking about God as Supreme Substance, to conceiving God as Absolute Subject and affirming God as Absolute Communion.

    THEO3570 Theology of Today for Adults of Tomorrow
    This course allows students to explore, understand and integrate theological approaches to central aspects of Christian faith. These theological approaches are examined in light of cultural shifts and new paradigms in the Church and in the world.

    THEO3680 Personal Growth and Integration
    This course explores insights into personal growth and integration from various fields, such as theology, spirituality, psychology, virtue ethics, and feminist studies. It will examine how these understandings complement and criticise each other yet converge towards forming a contemporary paradigm of 'becoming whole' that is in tune with the Christian view of the human person and of the journey to personal maturity.

    THEO3700 Human Affectivity in Theology and Christian Living
    This course examines the role and significance of emotions and of the “heart” in Christian Theology and in moral and spiritual living. This course traces the historical trajectory of the main aspects of human affectivity in Western and Christian humanism beginning with the Scriptures (Hebrew and Christian) and Greek thought and proceeds through authors such as Augustine, Aquinas, John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, and John Paul II. This course also focuses upon the affections and the 'heart' in the light of personal growth and maturity in human and Christian living, and how this is modelled in the person of Jesus Christ.

    THEO3900 Directed Individual Study
    Pre-requisite: Dean’s approval required
    This course will enable students to explore in detail a specific topic in theology. The topic can be selected from any of the 5 discipline areas in theology: Scripture, Church History, Systematic Theology, Moral Theology, or Pastoral Theology.

    THEO3950 Special Topics in Theology
    Pre-requisite: Any 100-level Theology course
    This course enables students to explore in detail a specific topic in theology. The topic can be selected from any of the 5 discipline areas in theology: Scripture, Church History, Systematic Theology, Moral Theology, or Pastoral Theology.

    THEO6001 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
    An introduction to exegetical method in Biblical Hebrew, this course will establish a basic understanding of the Hebrew Alphabet, the grammatical structure of Biblical Hebrew, a basic vocabulary and the basic tools of translation. Students will be introduced to various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate simple Old Testament passages.

    THEO6002 Introduction to New Testament Greek
    An introduction to exegetical method in Koiné Greek, this course will establish a basic understanding of the Greek Alphabet, the grammatical structure of Koiné Greek, a basic vocabulary and the basic tools of translation. Students will be introduced to various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate simple NT passages

    THEO6003 Introduction to Latin
    An introduction to Latin, this course will establish a basic understanding of the grammatical structure of Latin, a basic vocabulary and the basic tools of translation. Students will be introduced to various lexical and grammatical aids and will be able to translate simple passages.

    THEO6004 Early Church History: The Story Begins
    This course involves a study of the life of the early Church, not simply as something significant in its own right, but also for the foundations it laid for the later development of Christianity. The course examines the way that the early Church related to the Jewish and Hellenistic traditions and it examines how the power of the Roman Empire shaped the early Church. The course also explores the development of Christian understanding regarding the nature of God, the Holy Trinity, the relations between divinity and humanity in Christ, and the importance of seeing God's purpose in the world.

    THEO6005 Sacraments of Healing and Reconciliation
    The experiences of sin, suffering, illness and death are fundamental to every human life. The Church's ritual responses to each of these experiences mediate the healing and reconciliation offered to sinners and the sick by Christ the physician of our souls and bodies. This unit traces the biblical foundations, historical development, theological understandings, canonical interpretations and current ritual practice of the church in its pastoral care of sinners and the sick. Through an in-depth study of the Rite of Penance and the Rites of Anointing of the Sick and Viaticum, the unit explores the sacramental theology underpinning the church's response to the ongoing individual and communal need for healing and reconciliation in today's world.

    THEO6006 Writings of Paul: Freedom in the Spirit
    This course studies the life and work of Paul the Apostle, his writings and those of the “Pauline school,” including the Pastoral Epistles. It examines key texts in relation to the development of early Christianity and its message.

    THEO6010 Scripture and Church
    This course explores the foundations of Catholic Christian tradition from Old Testament concept of who God is and the New Testament revelation of Jesus: incarnate Son and Saviour. The course also examines faith communities that grew out of that experience.

    THEO6011 Translating Biblical Hebrew
    Building on the course Introduction to Biblical Hebrew this course will explore exegetical method in Biblical Hebrew. The course will advance understanding of grammatical structure of Biblical Hebrew giving an expanded vocabulary and the tools of exegetical study of Biblical Hebrew. Students will be encouraged to employ various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate advanced Biblical Hebrew passages.

    THEO6012 Translating New Testament Greek
    Pre-requisite course : Introduction to New Testament Greek
    The course will advance understanding of grammatical structure of Koiné Greek, an expanded vocabulary and the tools of exegetical study of Koiné Greek. Students will be encouraged to employ various lexical and exegetical aids and will be able to translate advanced NT passages.

    THEO6013 Translating Latin
    Building on the course Introduction to Latin, this course will advance understanding of grammatical structure of Latin giving an expanded vocabulary and the tools of study of Latin. Students will be encouraged to employ various lexical and grammatical aids and will be able to translate Classical and Ecclesial passages.

    THEO6020 Spirituality and the Challenges of Reconciliation
    This course is based on the principles of Catholic social teaching and focuses on the need to develop a spirituality that will enable people of different cultures and histories to live in harmony. The course proposes that the spirituality for the third millennium is a spirituality of reconciliation. This course provides an opportunity to study the meaning of reconciliation theologically; to look at situations nationally and globally where reconciliation is needed; and to reflect on the skills and strategies used by churches, organisations and individuals to bring about reconciliation in various conflict situations around the world will be provided in this course. Special emphasis will be placed on the Australian scene.

    THEO6120 Pentateuch
    A study of the Pentateuch (Genesis - Deuteronomy) in terms of narrative structure and theories of composition, based on recent scholarly research. The course will also explore the key traditions and themes of Mosaic Law.

    THEO6130 Psalms and Wisdom
    The book of Psalms and the Wisdom Literature in the Old Testament contains expressions of the people of Israel’s faith and worship. This course examines these expressions from the perspective of form, theology, themes, traditions, and quest for truth and meaning. Wisdom books are selected for detailed study.

    THEO6140 The Prophets: Critics of the Status Quo
    The prophetic literature in the Old Testament contains prosaic and poetic materials associated with Israel’s prophets. This course provides an overview of their literary features, themes, theological perspectives, history and growth, in their historical and cultural contexts. A more detailed study is then done of selected books by a major and a minor prophet.

    THEO6150 Theology of Leadership
    This course will be of value to all those professional and practising leaders who deal with the demands of their mission. This will have particular reference to non-profit organisations. While the world of work creates its own demands, many feel people strive to balance their personal and spiritual needs with the requirements of leadership. This course will investigate the Christian understanding of leadership in a values-based, ethical milieu and will allow participants to explore and articulate their leadership in a Christian perspective.
    The context of the starting point is explicitly Christian. The Old Testament contains some powerful models of leadership, some of which are developed and/or critiqued within the New Testament heritage. Further reflection by the Church in its continuing search to better understand human nature and Revelation has added to and nuanced this Scriptural tradition. Writers of our times have also contributed to this reflection and their thinking and reflection will be explored in the light of the Church's understanding.

    THEO6210 Introduction to the New Testament
    This course introduces students to the literature of the New Testament. It includes an overview of content and major themes from selected passages. The course also introduces the socio-economic, political, and wider religious setting of the writings and their relationship to the life and ministry of Jesus. The course offers students an opportunity to learn both the content of New Testament Study and its method, serving both as an introduction to the New Testament itself and as a foundation for further studies in the field.

    THEO6220 The Johannine Literature
    This course involves a study of the New Testament writings associated with the name of John, emphasising the background and theological witness to Jesus of the Fourth Gospel, and considering the ongoing development of the Johannine traditions and community in the Epistles of John.

    THEO6230 Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles
    This course involves a study of Luke’s gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. The course examines both the ministry of Jesus and the beginnings of the Christian community as described in the Acts of the Apostles.

    THEO6240 Scripture and Morality
    This course reflects on the changing role of Scripture in moral theology and examines how moral thinking developed in the early Christian Church. Having grounded Christian morality in the Beatitudes and the Great Commandment, this course explores the relationship between an ancient text, regarded by Christians as inspired and normative, and contemporary ethical issues.

    THEO6340 Modern Church History
    The French Revolution and the Enlightenment mark a turning point in the Churches’ relationship with European culture and political thought. This course reviews how the Missionary movement, fundamentalism and the revival in biblical, theological and liturgical studies influenced the Church's relationship with the modern world.

    THEO6350 Foundations of Moral Theology
    This course deals with the relationship between Christian faith and the moral decisions one makes in life. The course explores the meaning and structure of the moral life in the Catholic tradition - especially in the renewal of moral theology called for by Vatican II—with a principal focus on developing a student's capacity for moral reflection. Principle themes include the nature and meaning of moral theology, the human person and the moral life, sources of moral knowledge, the meaning of moral behaviour.

    THEO6370 The Theology and Practice of the New Evangelisation
    This course introduces students to the theology and practice of evangelisation as it is understood in the Catholic Church. The course involves a survey of the theology and practice of evangelisation from biblical times up to the present age provides a backdrop for the study of the modern encyclicals on evangelisation, Evangelii Nuntiandi and Evangelii Gaudium, as well as other relevant Church documents. Students will examine the challenges posed by the missionary mandate over 2000 years of Christian history in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the Church’s theological and pastoral responses to these challenges.

    THEO6400 Christology
    This course introduces students to the kinds of questions that arise concerning the person, life, work, and significance of Jesus Christ. The course considers answers offered in the Christian tradition and current Christological scholarship. The course covers the Jesus tradition in the New Testament, types of New Testament Christology, the question of the historical Jesus, controversies in the early church and at the time of the Reformation.

    THEO6410 Fundamental Theology
    This course focuses on the foundational building blocks of theology in the Christian tradition, particularly upon the nature and locus of revelation, the nature of faith, and the interrelationship between revelation and faith. The course addresses the inseparability of the “God” question from human beings’ universal search for meaning, the role of faith within that search, the relationship between faith and reason, and the nature of revelation (as codified in Sacred Scripture and Tradition). Special attention is devoted how the Bible and Tradition are to be understood and read as the Word of God.

    THEO6420 Eucharist I
    This course analyses the biblical origins together with the historical patterns and devotional forms of Eucharistic celebration as these developed in the tradition from the Last Supper to today. The study's focus is on the pastoral consequences for today inasmuch as “the Eucharist makes the Church and the Church makes the Eucharist”.

    THEO6440 Mystery of Christ: Church and Sacrament
    In the Christian tradition celebration is a technical phrase that links up past, present and future, all being seen as facets of the self-revelation of God. Beginning with mystery as the root meaning of sacramentality, this course traces the self-revelation of God in salvation history through Christ, through the Church, and through sacramental rites. The course makes connections between the transcendence of God as beyond human experience, and the immanence of God, as being within human experience. The course also develops the powerful potential of symbol and ritual as the entry point of the sacred, that point of meeting which is the goal of religion: to bring together the vision of faith and the meaning of life.

    THEO6450 Marriage and Orders
    Beginning with baptism as the primary source of vocation and mission in the Church, this course focuses on the sacraments of serving the communion of disciples especially, within the classic tradition, those of marriage and holy orders. Attention is also given to religious life and the ministries of the Church.

    THEO6460 Eschatology: The Living Hope of Christians
    In its exploration of the Christian estimate of the “after-life,” this course explores the nature of Christian hope and the meaning of death for a Christian, the fact and mystery of resurrection and heaven, the understanding of hell’s eternity and of purgatory as an ecumenical problem, and the final destiny of the “Person-in-Cosmos.”

    THEO6470 Sacraments in Catholic Tradition
    The course covers the building blocks and the theological developments that led to the seven Sacraments of the Catholic Tradition. It also covers the scriptural, historical, theological and liturgical principles of each of the seven Sacraments. Students require this understanding of the Sacraments to enable them to teach Sacraments and to prepare Sacramental celebrations at School level.

    THEO6480 Sacraments of Initiation
    This course studies the Sacraments of Initiation: Baptism, Confirmation and Eucharist within the Catholic tradition. It considers the anthropological roots of ritual and examines the Jewish and Christian origins of the ritual practices in the contemporary church. Tracing the influence of historical development and their pastoral and theological consequences in different moments of the Church's life. The course shows how these impact upon the celebration of the Eucharist, Baptism, and Confirmation today.

    THEO6490 Bioethics
    This course examines how the Roman Catholic tradition enables one to identify and respond to ethical issues surrounding health, sickness and healing and raised by the use of modern medical technologies. The course considers beginning of life issues such as when does life begin, reproductive technologies, genetic screening, prenatal diagnosis and stem cell research. The course also considers end of life issues such as care for the terminally ill, euthanasia and the allowing people to die distinction. Other areas covered include organ donation, the principle of cooperation and justice and health care.

    THEO6510 Liturgy: Work of God and Work of God’s People
    This course begins with a foundational theological exploration of the self-revelation of God, whose relationship with us is called grace. The course demonstrates how this divine revelation co-relates with the human search for meaning through the personal and corporate expressions of identity, bonding and shared values, which we call ritual. Finally, the course practically applies the theological principles elaborated to a consideration of liturgical participation, its goals and purpose.

    THEO6540 Trinity
    This course investigates the biblical witness to God as Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It discusses the development of the conceptuality of the doctrine of the Trinity and some modern restatements of the doctrine. The course considers the significance of the Trinity in its centrality to Christian life and ministry.

    THEO6550 Pastoral Theology Foundations I
    This course examines the nature of pastoral care, its relationship to pastoral theology and the theological and psychological foundations of pastoral ministry. It looks at Jesus as a pastor, develop some working assumptions and suggests a suitable contemporary model of pastoral theology. The course explores the psychological role and theological significance of the emotions, especially the negative emotions, e.g. fear, guilt, shame, anger. There are also processes for developing self-awareness together with a method of theological reflection.

    THEO6560 Marriage and Sexuality
    This course focuses on the theological understanding of marriage, family, divorce, contraception and homosexuality in the Catholic tradition. The course also explores the broader anthropological and theological understandings of human sexuality and their implications for human relationships and sexual behaviour.

    THEO6590 Theology of Today for Adults of Tomorrow
    This course allows students to explore, understand and integrate theological approaches to central aspects of Christian faith. These theological approaches are examined in light of cultural shifts and new paradigms in the Church and in the world.

    THEO6680 Personal Growth and Integration
    This course explores insights into personal growth and integration from various fields, such as theology, spirituality, psychology, virtue ethics, and feminist studies. It will examine how these understandings complement and criticise each other yet converge towards forming a contemporary paradigm of 'becoming whole' that is in tune with the Christian view of the human person and of the journey to personal maturity.

    THEO6700 Human Affectivity in Theology and Christian Living
    This course is based on the principles of Catholic social teaching and focuses on the need to develop a spirituality that will enable people of different cultures and histories to live in harmony. The course proposes that the spirituality for the third millennium is a spirituality of reconciliation. This course provides an opportunity to study the meaning of reconciliation theologically; to look at situations nationally and globally where reconciliation is needed; and to reflect on the skills and strategies used by churches, organisations and individuals to bring about reconciliation in various conflict situations around the world will be provided in this course. Special emphasis will be placed on the Australian scene.

    THEO6900 Directed Individual Study
    This course enables students to explore in detail a specific topic in theology. The topic can be selected from any of the 5 discipline areas in theology: Scripture, Church History, Systematic Theology, Moral Theology, or Pastoral Theology.
    Approval from the Dean of the School of Philosophy and Theology is required to enrol in this course.

    THEO6950 Special Topics in Theology
    This course enables students to explore in detail a specific topic in theology. The topic can be selected from any of the 5 discipline areas in theology: Scripture, Church History, Systematic Theology, Moral Theology, or Pastoral Theology.

  • Core Curriculum: The LOGOS Programme

    What is the Logos Programme?

    The Logos Programme is an innovative way in which the University delivers the Core Curriculum on the Sydney Campus. It is comprised of three units (Logos I, Logos II, and Logos III) which aim to enrich students' education by introducing them to philosophy, ethics and theology within the Catholic liberal arts tradition.

    What makes the Logos Programme unique?

    The Logos Programme offers students more choice in relation to the topics which they study within the Core Curriculum. It does this by offering self-contained 'modules', which are 3.5 hour learning sessions focused on a particular topic. Each semester there will be between 40 and 50 different topics to choose from. A number of modules are repeated so there will normally be almost 150 module sessions on the timetable to choose from, in Semester 1 and Semester 2.

    How do you complete a Logos unit?

    Each Logos unit consists of 8 modules and a graded assessment. Except for 4 compulsory modules across the programme, students choose which modules they will do. For example, in the first Logos unit, Logos I, students do the compulsory module 'Think' --an introduction to the foundations of philosophy and, in particular, the skills of critical thinking and informal logic—but the other 7 modules they choose from the pool of modules on offer. Likewise, in Logos II, students choose 7 electives and do one compulsory module called 'Choose' which is an introduction to the key concepts and theories in Western moral philosophy as well as skills in practical reasoning and decision making. In the final Logos unit, Logos III, students to do 6 electives and 2 compulsory modules, 'Live' and 'Learn', which introduce some key concepts in theology and in the teachings of the Catholic Church.

    How does the Logos Programme affect your degree?

    To find out when the Logos units are to be completed within your course structure, contact the course coordinator in your School.

    Where can you get more information?

    The Logos team can be contacted at the School of Philosophy and Theology Office (for administrative matters) and in the Logos Room (NDS17, Level 1, 22 City Rd) during teaching periods (for academic matters). You can also send an email to sydney.philosophytheology@nd.edu.au

    Students who have enrolled in Logos units will be given access to Logos unit course sites on BlackBoard one week before modules begin. Blackboard is the University's Learning Management System. It is accessible via the main University web page (click on the 'Web Portals' tab ). At the beginning of each semester, students enrolled in Logos units will also receive an email containing the unit outline and instructions on how to sign up for modules online.